Loin for ground pork

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dagger, Feb 4, 2016.

  1. dagger

    dagger

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    I'm not sure how much fat content plays in ground pork like it does in ground beef so would grinding a pork lion be ok if mixing it with ground beef. it would be used in meatloaf, sauces, stuff peppers things like this.
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Meat is meat, the principles are the same.  Fat content, marbling, etc. matter just as much in pork.  When I shop for pork I look for marbling as well. 

    Loin and tenderloin as in beef, they are are lean cuts.  If you add this to a lean cut of beef, you need to add some fat.

    Every time I trim pork belly, ribs, shoulder, etc.  I separate out bits of fat and save them in the freezer.  Any time I'm making sausage or ground, if it is lacking in fat, i just throw some of that fat in the mix.
     
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  3. chefross

    chefross

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    I do the same thing when I butcher a hog each fall.

    You need to visually evaluate how much fat is on that loin of yours, and determine if you need more fat.

    I do a ratio of 3;1 or three parts meat to one part fat.

    If you intend to mix it with ground beef, I'd choose chuck as it has more flavor. You may find you will have to reduce the pork fat if the beef is fattier. 80/20 ground chuck is best. I love stuffed peppers with the mix.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2016
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  4. virgil

    virgil

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    Mixing ground beef with ground pork is an excellent way to make meatballs, too.

    If anyone asks me for grinding tips, I always make it a point to tell them to save both pork and beef fat.  You never know what you're going to need it. 

    -V
     
  5. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I've never ground pork loin - it is too lean and too expensive for being ground up. Shoulder/butt has the perfect fat to lean ratio for grinding and use in sausage/meatloaf... plus it is a lot more affordable.
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    And by fat we don't mean what I call "lube" fat - that squishy, watery fat in the seams that lubricates different muscles.  It should be a good hard type of fat.
     
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  7. virgil

    virgil

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    Indeed.....
     
  8. dagger

    dagger

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    can adding some bacon to the pork when grinding add fat, the uncured type
     
  9. mike9

    mike9

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    Sure - I keep bacon trimmings in the freezer and grind with beef for burgers.  Cube your meat and place in the freezer then grind it when it stiffens up.  Keep your grinder head in the fridge while waiting for the meat and fat to firm up.  If you're going to run it twice through different die put it back in the freezer before the next run.  If you're going to season it do it after the first run.
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Sure it will, but between the pork belly (uncured bacon) and pork loin you are going to have some expensive ground pork.  I'd save both of those things for other uses and buy yourself some pork butt, or shoulder.  A lot cheaper and less work as it already has about the right meat to fat ratio.
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    For those who add pork to their burgers, does it mean you have to cook your burgers more thoroughly than if you were using just beef?
     
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  12. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    KK, If I was grinding my own, I would cook them further than MR as I don't like the texture of pork that is that rare, but I'd still only cook them  to just beyond Medium.  Pork is really safe nowadays so I am not terribly concerned.  I cook a lot of my pork only to the point where it still has a bit of pink in the middle.

    Now, if I am adding sausage (usually store bought) as I do with my Chorizo burgers (2 parts burger meat to 1 part Mexican chorizo) I will cook them to well done.  With the extra fat from the sausage the burgers can be cooked well done but still have plenty of moisture to them.
     
  13. dagger

    dagger

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    Last time I bought a pork butt was years ago down in florida, think it was less than $1 pound. Since then its been chops or pork loin you get in costco & bj's. I don't even remember seeing a pork butt in either place. My mom used to cook butt in a pot with potatoes & sauerkraut and would eat it with apple sauce. I have a kichenaid artisan mixer with grinder attachments.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
  14. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    This is a good topic.

    It had never occurred to me to save the suet when trimming (but then again it always seems to be the boys job to butcher) and will pass along to the dedicated knife department lol.

    My freezer is full of baking scraps (and perishables like nuts) for throw down desserts.

    Top half baking, bottom half protiens... some home processed items... some just repackaged for the long haul.

    mimi