lobster stock?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by toddlove8845, Oct 12, 2005.

  1. toddlove8845

    toddlove8845

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    when making lobster stock do you prefer to roast the heads or just add them to to your stock?
     
  2. dano1

    dano1

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    i buy bodies(heads), pull out the insides, and use the insides almost exclusively. Will maybe save the carapaces for a bisque or other shellfish stock or soup app. saute off the inners in whole butter and proceed for the stock.
     
  3. chef john

    chef john

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    I soak the heads in cold water for an hour, then roast them. I proceed with the stock as normal from that point. The flavor is slightly different than that of shells just boiled. I use the roast lobster stock for sauces and broths, and the boiled shell stock for soups.
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I like to roast mine. I've worked in places that will "poach" lobster carcasses in butter, then toss the carcasses into a stock. The butter is used for a'la minute mounting of sauces and the like...
     
  5. sucrechef

    sucrechef

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    We used to make it from sauteed shells flamed with Pernod and with shrimp shells in for extra flavor.
     
  6. dpeitzsche

    dpeitzsche

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    I am going to be making lobster bisque.  Is it a good idea to start a lobster stock first?
     
  7. rbandu

    rbandu

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    It's essential.
     
  8. dpeitzsche

    dpeitzsche

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    After I boiled off the lobsters I shelled them and then crushed them up and made a stock with veggies and liquid.

    I strained it off a then reduced it by half.  It turned out great.  Rich in texture and flavour.
     
  9. antuco

    antuco

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    I am looking for a good recipe for lobster bisque please help
     
  10. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I roast first, it intensifies the flavors. Don't over roast otherwise they will be bitter.
     
  11. yourmontage87

    yourmontage87

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    I Order lobster bodies from the local fish market and boil the bodies using a mire poix. Strain then reduce.
     
  12. chef bilby

    chef bilby

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    +1 only we use Prawns Down here /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif
     
  13. olechef

    olechef

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    Depends on what I'm going to use it for. If the color doesn't matter, I don't roast. (the color tends to get a bit greenish grey without roasting)
    I allways boil it with white wine and fishstock, not water. Gives it more richness and body.
     
  14. rpooley

    rpooley

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    I know this is an old thread but I like this idea for eliminating that color without resorting to too much tomato paste or other color/flavor.  Thanks.
     
  15. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    When making lobster stock, I prefer to saute the shells first, as I feel this brings the vibrant color to the forefront and helps to set it.
     
  16. rpooley

    rpooley

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    Thanks.  The taste is always good but I hate fussing with the color sometimes.

    Oops, apologies.  I did a topic search and did not realize I was in a professional thread.  Hope the moderator doesn't kill me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  17. youngchefkarl

    youngchefkarl

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    I believe this is the way Jacques Pepin showed me when he prepared his lobster sauce, I prefer this method but you can get similar results from roasting.
     
  18. joel1

    joel1

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    I dont know in the US but over Europe there's a preparation called sauce a l'americaine (Pardon my French) which is a basically a shellfish stock + tomato and cognac reduced to thick paste (some like the Spanish add a pinch of saffron) which is commonly used to start any lobster bisque or whatever you have in mind.
    I believe that you'll need at least eight lobster's shell to get a decent 2liters lobster stock...  so if you make your maths it does sounds quite expensive, at least to my ears.
     
  19. rpooley

    rpooley

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    Thanks.  Do you have a recipe (if it is much different from a typical sauce l'americaine that is)?
     
  20. joel1

    joel1

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    I am sure you can google and find many but what I can is give you a rough idea of what I would do...
    roast about 300gr crustacean shells/heads with some peppercorns, star anise and fennel seeds in a smoking hot iron or heavy pot. Flambé that with Pernod/grand marniere or whatever brandy then transfer that to a separated bowI which I would cover with cling film to keep flavors inside and obtain some liquid about 20 minutes before I crush them.
    In the same pan I used before but at a medium low heat I would sweat down progressively 50gr onions, 50gr shallots, 10gr garlic, 100gr with 20gr olive oil and 30gr butter about 15min. At this point turn the gas to a high heat and add 150ml white wine, bring that to a boil, then you'll need to add 400gr tomatoes (skins/seeds off) let that cook for good 5mimutes and then add about 700ml fish stock/broth. Boil that up, skim off. Grind the heads and shells that you reserves in the bowl with a handmixer (keep the cling film wrapped as will save from cleaning the walls afterwords.... To follow, pour the shell's paste with the stock, bring to a boil, skim it off, reduce the heat and let that simmer about an hour, grind it with the handmixer again, pass it through a fine sieve.... Repeat boiling,skimming off.

    This is for a small batch of you want to scale it up I would suggest to roast the crustacean in the oven

    Hope it helps and sorry about my poor English


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