Lobster Ravioli

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by goldilocks, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Tomorow I am going to attempt to make Ravioli for the first time. It sounds pretty simple, but I wondered if you had any tips to offer? I'm really looking forward to trying it, it is something I have wanted to make for ages.

    I am planning on making Lobster Ravioli with Lobster Sauce and Ottolenghi's Mange Tout and French Bean salad to go on the side. I'm not totally convinced the orange will go with the ravioli though.. what do you think? I might drop that part of the recipe.

    Lobster ravioli: http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/lobster_ravioli_with_66923

    Side dish: http://breadandbutternyc.typepad.com/blog/2012/02/french-beansmange-tout.html

    I'd love your thoughts/tips.

    Thanks in advance /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

    Goldi
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2014
  2. slayertplsko

    slayertplsko

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    Orange will go fine as far as I'm concerned. Go for it if you like and then don't forget to post it in this months' challenge thread. Have you ever made homemade pasta? If not, perhaps you would like to start with something simpler, like ricotta-and-spinach-stuffed ravioli with tomato sauce? And then make the lobster ravioli? Just a thought. 
     
  3. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Great thank you.

    No I have never made pasta before. I like a challenge /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    I'll post photos, good or bad, after so you can all have a chuckle if it comes out a total disaster!

    Goldi
     
  4. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Goldi, I just read the lobster ravioli recipe by -none other than- James Martin! The recipe is a challenge but it's really a very good step-by-step explanation. Just be carefull when making the base of the filling which is made from prawns and cream. Be sure the prawns and the cream are ice and icecold! These components need to make sort of a firm paste (absolutely not watery) to which the lobster is added.

    Also, make sure you paint the eggwash nicely but not too much around the filling so they close nicely.When closing them, take care to gently push out as much air in the ravioli as you possibly can.

    Boil them as soon as they're made, you can always rewarm them later in the sauce. When they are boiled you can concentrate on the sauce.

    On the side dish; it's up to you, but you will have your hands full already with the ravioli.

    Fingers crossed?
     
  5. slayertplsko

    slayertplsko

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    Chris, I would choose a slightly different route. I would first make the dough and while the dough is resting (it's definitely a good idea to let it rest for at least 30 minutes as it will be easier to work with) I would make the filling and then the sauce (or most of it). Only then would I venture into rolling the dough, placing the filling and shaping the ravioli. Then you can (more-than-)parboil the pasta immediately and while it's cooking, quickly reheat the sauce and finish cooking the ravioli in the sauce. And serve as soon as possible.

    The theory behind it is that the filling can wait a quite bit (it's going to be cooked again in the ravioli), the sauce (there is no cream so I wouldn't hurry much) and the uncooked pasta a bit less so, but the cooked pasta cannot wait more than a minute before it starts to dry out and thus its capability to absorb the sauce diminishes. I like to stick to the rule I learned from Marcella Hazan (from her book, of course) when I first started learning about Italian cuisine: as little time should elapse between boiling the pasta, draining it, mixing it with the sauce, serving it and eating it.

    But as I said, I think this is quite a demanding recipe for your first stuffed pasta. But if you feel inspired and must do it, then do it!
     
  6. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Hi Chris & Slayertplsko,

    Thank you both for your advice, it was very welcome indeed.

    I am pleased to say, it was a success!! I rolled the pasta through the machine 4 times and thought it felt very thin, however on refection I could probably have rolled in smaller sections and rolled it once or twice more. I was worried it would tear, and stopped. I felt the ravioli once cooked was a little thick, not awfully so, but it could have done with being a tad thinner for my liking.

    My beautiful lobster:


    Making the lobster stock which then became the sauce:



    Finished filled pasta (with the cream and prawn puree topped with a basil leaf and slice of lobster):


    And the plated dish!


    I was so pleased that it came out well, and it tasted beautiful. Lobster is expensive in the UK (that one was £25) so it would have been a costly dish to mess up.

    I really enjoyed making it, and now I know what to expect I am going to try some other fillings. I'm thinking scollops next...

    Goldi
     
    nicko likes this.
  7. eastshores

    eastshores

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    Very nice job and beautiful photos! I recently asked about making a lobster bisque as the sauce for lobster ravioli, looks like you took a similar approach having the shells in the stock.
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Goldi, two thumbs up for your first attempt on ravioli making! Don't worry about thickness, I guess making a first batch like that is a big success. Quite an animal you used and I see you added some samphyre.

    I remember when I made ravioli for the first time I also worried about it tearing. Now I add a tbsp of olive oil whenever I make pasta dough to add just a bit of stretch. It also helps to roll the dough through the widest opening a few times, each time folding the rolled dough back in two; it helps the gluten to develope which strenghtens your dough too.

    But still, fantastic result.
     
  9. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Thanks guys /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif   I was super happy with them!!

    Thanks for the tip Chris, I like the olive oil idea. I will do that next time.
     
  10. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    This is an old post but I just had to say @Goldilocks  what an amazing job you did on the raviolis. What I was taught and seemed to work well was after rolling out your dough to brush off the flour and paint the entire bottom with egg wash, then put the filling down, then cover this with the second layer of pasta. Then take a cloth towel and pat down the pasta and this will remove all of the air gently without tearing the pasta. I agree with Chris in adding a little olive oil to help with the elasticity of the dough. Actually when I was in Italy the restaurant I worked at used the a very similar recipe to the one you posted but instead of adding olive oil we added water.

    1Kg Flour (duro "00")

    8-10 eggs

    salt

    warm water

    Thanks again for sharing your photos it looks like it was an outstanding meal.
     
  11. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Hi Nicko

    Thanks so much for the advice. I haven't tried making ravioli since but I have made easier things. I shall try that in future, thank you!

    Goldi