Liquid Glucose

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Joined Feb 13, 2013
Just curious if anyone here incorporates liquid glucose into their pastry repertoire? I'm talking 100% from wheat liquid glucose, not corn syrup. Just to catch you guys up I am a sous chef, not a pastry chef.

I'm wondering because from my understanding it's properties are quite different from granulated sugar, keeps baked goods moister and gives glazes better shine etc. I oddly can't find much info about it online or even many recipes that include it. Is there a way to substitute liquid glucose for granulated sugar (or a portion I imagine is a more appropriate choice)? How and where are you guys using it?
 
5,192
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Joined Jul 28, 2001
We use liquid glucose, and we also use powdered glucose for some baked goods.
 
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282
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Joined Feb 13, 2013
 
We use liquid glucose, and we also use powdered glucose for some baked goods.

The liquid we use is not wheat, it's potato, which I prefer. The glucose will keep your finished product from drying out fast. We use the liquid glucose usually where we would use honey.We use a 1 to 1, and reduce the liquid a very small amount.

The glucose powder is a little trickier. It absorbs a lot more so you have to scale up the liquid or scale down the dry.

I have found that he glucose is about 1/2 the sweetness of regular sugar. and maybe 70-80% as sweet as honey.

It's great for things like brownies, they stay really moist. HTH's
Yes, this does help thanks. If you're using liquid glucose where you would honey in a 1:1 ratio, how do you do scale it for granulated sugar?
 
1,086
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Joined Jun 6, 2007
Liquid glucose should be tasteless (other than sweet) and is essentially chemically identical regardless of the source material (potato, wheat or corn) if it fills these conditions:

if the product contains only 1 (2) ingredient i.e glucose (and water).

if it's transparent, clear thick liquid without any colour

If it has the same brix i.e. 80 degrees brix.

If the product fails in any of these conditions, it's not liquid glucose but a mixture of different sugars.

One is the substitute of the other liquid because regardless of the source material when digested (processed) starch becomes pure liquid glucose because every starch is a glucose polymer (branched chain). That is actually it's definition: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starch

Honey on the other hand is more difficult to substitute because it has flavour, colour and is composed of fructose, glucose and sucrose so liquid glucose is not an exact match.

Glucose is a great humectant i.e. keeps this from drying out, keeps cake moist longer.  Sugar (Sucrose) not as much.

Luc H.
 
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Joined Jul 28, 2001
I pretty sure I haven't mentioned anything about flavor when it comes to glucose,
 
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1,086
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Joined Jun 6, 2007
 
I pretty sure I haven't mentioned anything about flavor when it comes to glucose,

Ours is from potato and is de 43.
I may have lead the discussion in the wrong direction with my comment above.  As an industrial food ingredient, liquid glucose is a very thick crystal clear syrupy liquid that contains 80% (20% water) by weight of pure glucose made from the digestion of food starch.  The DE (dextrose equivalent) is always 90+ since it's pure glucose with water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dextrose_equivalent. Dextrose powder should have a DE of 100 since it has no water.

the difference is explained here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose_syrup

The commercial/food service ingredient, liquid glucose is not the same standard because a DE of 43 means that the starch is not completely digested to glucose units and polysaccharides remain.

Sorry for the confusion.

Luc H.
 
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