Liquid Eggs

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chefross, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. chefross

    chefross

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    In many places I have worked the health department forbids the pooling of cracked eggs for things like egg wash, French Toast batter, and so on. Many corporation food services use them as a matter of safety on a daily basis.

    My comment has to do with consistency. When made into scrambled eggs, the liquid eggs aren't bad, especially for a chaffing dish situation. In many instances I have added a Bechamel to the eggs to help with consistency and flavor. Others might use milk or cream or a mixture of the 2.

    The other day, I had breakfast out in the dining room of a Ramada Inn hotel chain. They used liquid eggs for their omelettes.  It was obvious that the preparation had been done a flat top grill. The omelette was square as you can imagine but had no depth or flavor, hence my question.

    Can anyone here that uses this product offer any ideas as to how to make those wretched liquid eggs taste and feel more like the real thing?
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I use the egg products exclusively for baking.  But I have used them succesfully for large batch breakfasts, and they do OK as omelettes.

    But to answer the question, the only way to boost flavour is to add it.  No more "au naturelle" ommies, make with (pre) sauted mushrooms, tomatoes, ham and cheddar, even green onions.

    Failing that, at least do them in a pan with real butter to give them some modicum of flavour, I'm assuming the flat-top ommie was made with tasteless veg oil.
     
  3. nick alexander

    nick alexander

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    We use them for the large batches of scrambled eggs. Never done them on the flat top , just a large pan with Whirl/Beyond (butter/oil substitute)

    We sauté some veg to top them with that and cheddar.

    They are okay I guess. Nothing like our farm fresh eggs that we use for omelets and bennies etc

    People seem to like them. Just cook them wet and top them. Pretty much your only hope.

    The consistency has always came out fine for me. We add literally nothing to them. (as far as cream or even S&P)

    Anything other than the real thing isn't going to hold its own.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  4. robo

    robo

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    use for bernaise, liquid ultra pasteurized
     
  5. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    This discussion brings back memories of pulling KP in 1965. Cook is getting breakfast ready for about 500 troops and has a pot, BIG pot, of dried eggs he is stirring up for scrambled eggs, hollers at me to get him a "flat of eggs" (2 1/2 dozen) from the cooler. I get them and start cracking them one by one. He stops me and tells me to dump the flat in, shells and all, commenting, "When they find an eggshell in their scrambled eggs, they'll know they are not powdered!"
     
     
  6. berndy

    berndy

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    Very similar situation while I was chef at an Officer's Club on a US Military base in Germany. We did buy our fresh eggs from the commissary and I was asked by some of the Mess Sergeants on base to save the egg-shells for them.I did have huge bucket in my freezer and usually some PFC on Kp duty came by to get some to be used on Holiday's and Sundays in their breakfast,.

    They were used in scrambled eggs, french toast batter and pancake mix to fool the troops.
     
  7. foodpump

    foodpump

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    had a b'fast cook who cracked fresh eggs the "easy way"

    He dumped whole flats in the 30 qt, stuck a  paddle in, mixed, and dumped the mess through a china cap.

    He was genuinely curious why I was upset with his technique.

    I asked him what else chickens produce, I was rewarded with a "huh?"

    I asked him if he ever worked on a farm or ever collected eggs from real, live chickens.

    Again, I was rewarded with a "huh?"

    To put it bluntly, I told him that chickens regularily crap on their eggs, and if I ever caught him doing it again, I'd make him muck out a hen house after I fired him.
     
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