Lined or unlined bannetons first?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by sandsquid, Apr 14, 2014.

  1. sandsquid

    sandsquid

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    I'm looking to get a few proofing baskets stuck between non-removable lined  baskets form SFBI, or unlined from Lucky Clover.  (Since my wife and I are saving up for a chocolate tempering machine, I really can't afford to go all in and get both. )

    Am I giving up or gaining anything by going either way?



     
     
  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Mine are made in Germany by Herbert Birnbaum   and can be ordered thru TMB Baking of S.F..  They offer two methods of shipping:
    • Postal - very expensive
    • Container shipping - cheaper but takes about six weeks.
    (EDIT) You can purchase linen from TMB as well, just include a piece with your order of a banneton(s).
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Or checkout Fantes.com.
     
  4. sandsquid

    sandsquid

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  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I've done mostly bare cane and really, both linings are a no brainer.

    Bare = use lots of flour, I hear rice flour

    Lined = use lots of flour!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!     /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rollsmile.gif  
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2014
  6. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Honestly I'd say forgo either - unless you have a commitment to make a certain shape/style.

    Experiment more with high-hydration doughs and different baking containers and forming methods.

    Isn't the only reason for specific shapes / sizes / materials of proofing baskets just to shape and keep the regular dough from sticking?

    Embrace the sticky...

    - some of the more wacky and improvised solutions are way cool  - very adaptable and work amazingly

    http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14705/improvised-baguette-panmold

    http://www.americanpan.com/products/baguette-pans-1





    Anything with perforations should be lined with parchment obviously when using 'batter-doughs'...
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2014
  7. sandsquid

    sandsquid

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  8. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Nice!  a bit dark for what the rest of my family would like but I actually prefer the very dark bits of crust.

    What was the recipe?  If you used one!  :)

    Often I don't... I just let it go and see what happens.
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    If a banneton is properly filled, then proofing will result in a taller rise, one that is less spread out.  When filled and proofed, the dough should slightly overfill the banneton just like an overfilled bra cup and I'm not trying to be funny.
     
  10. sandsquid

    sandsquid

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    50:50 (by weight) Dark Rye / High Gluten (42%) and Hawaiian "Black Lava" Sea Salt, sprinkled with black sea salt before baking.
    The darker one is same only garnished with Alaea Hawaiian Sea Salt, and taken to the very cusp of over-done.

    The crumb is a bit too moist even this morning. makes great toast though. 


    Monday of next week I have to start following recipes, again.  

    Today is my last practical exam for fabrication, then we move on to what I hope to be my best/ favoritesemester, baking and confections.
     
  11. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    FWIW that's called an open crumb with a flying crust.  8)