Life after Tarte Tatin

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by hubuk, Oct 23, 2001.

  1. hubuk

    hubuk

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    When I got the recipe for Tarte Tatin it was also suggested that you could use the same technique to create savoury dishes.

    Having been thoroughly delighted with the results of my Tarte Tatin I would now like to have a go at doing savoury but where do I start? Obviously you can't caramelise a savoury dish in the same manner. All help and recipes gratefully accepted.:lips:
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Ah, but what about caramelizing onions (with dried herbs, that need the long cooking process) and turning them into a tatin-type tarte? After all, there are precedents for onion tarts, n'est-ce pas? I think it would be just grand! (Just so happens I have some caramelized onions in the freezer ... if I try it first, I'll let you know how it came out.) Sprinkle a little grated gruyere on top ... ooooh!
     
  3. hubuk

    hubuk

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    I had thought of caramelised onions - as it is the only vegetable I have ever caramelised. Would you sprinkle the gruyere on top of the onions and between the pastry of on the finished tarte after it has been turned out?

    The flavour of garlic would perhaps add a touch of magic? What about sweet peppers or tomatoes?
     
  4. pollyg

    pollyg

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    This is not so much a recipe as a description, but i've made it and it's yummy:
    In a frying pan that you can stick in the oven, stand up little lengths of leek (white part) and gently cook them with some stock, butter, sugar and salt ( and whatever herbs you may want). Simmer until they are tender and the liquid reduces to a savoury caramel. Place semi-dried tomato slivers in between the rounds of leek, place your pastry over the top and bake as you would a Tarte Tatin. Invert on to a plate and voila!
    You could use the basic method for lots of veg. I'm just thinking of caramelised baby carrot tart with sharp goats cheese.
    Good luck in your adventures.. :lips:
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    No, I would sprinkle the cheese after I had inverted the tart onto a heat-proof platter, and then run it under the broiler/salamander to melt and brown the cheese.

    Polly G's suggestions also sound delicious; I guess any vegs with a high sugar content (excluding peas) would work; how about sweet potatoes, or even turnips? You could use some interesting spices with them, and make sort of a trompe l'oeil savory Tarte Tatin that way. (I've always love the idea of trompe l'oeil foods.) ;)
     
  6. hubuk

    hubuk

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    I have not come across the expression "trompe l'oeil" before. Can you explain a little bit more?:confused:
     
  7. isa

    isa

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    Check out The Art of The Tart, there's a recipe for a tomato tatin. And a few variations on the classic tatin.
     
  8. hubuk

    hubuk

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    Where do I find The Art of The Tart? Is it a book or a website?
     
  9. w.debord

    w.debord

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    "Trompe l'oeil" is a art term meaning false image or fake image, too fool your eye. An example would be a painting on your wall that looks EXACTLY like a window, but there is no window at all only the flat wall with a window painted on it that looks so real you hardly can tell it's not real.

    So a fake tarte tatin could be anything that fools the eye being similar to the real tarte tatin.

    As soon as I read this I was thinking sweet potatos because they be sooo good carmelized. But I really can't think of what seasoning would be right with it. Kind of thinking curry or termeric for some reason...?
     
  10. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Or, in that same vein, you could make a fruit tatin, to look like a pizza.:bounce:
     
  11. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Wendy and Momoreg have it exactly right -- it is meant to fool ("tromper" in French) the eye ("l'oeil"). Give the impression of truly being one thing, when it is something else.

    This is one of my favorite food ideas; I'll probably start a new thread on it soon.

    As for the sweet potatoes -- a hint of curry would be really good, or even just a little powdered fenugreek (one of the possible elements in curry powder). Or you could use your usual spices as for sweet potato pie -- since it's the form that makes it unusual.;)
     
  12. hubuk

    hubuk

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    What about cinnamon and/or nutmeg with the sweet potatoes?

    Sweet potatoes would certainly be easier to cut to shape. Would you caramelise them the same way as the apples?

    The only thing that occurs to me is that, compared to apples, would sweet potatoes be that great a flavour? Sweet potatoes are not really my idea of savoury.
     
  13. isa

    isa

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    It's a book click here for more details. There is also a few sweet variations on the classic tatin.
     
  14. chefteldanielle

    chefteldanielle

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    Funny I came across this post I made a savory Tart "Tatin" tonight with onions, sundried tomatoes and basil in a puff pastry crust with Gruyere.. OMG... Explosion with a glas of early Muscat Oregon wine.. I was in heaven..
    Danielle
     
  15. hubuk

    hubuk

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    I would like to be in heaven too! Can you be a bit more specific with your steps and quantities to save me having to do trial and error - please.