Let's Talk Mushrooms

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mrdecoy1, Mar 25, 2012.

  1. mrdecoy1

    mrdecoy1

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    Wife and I have a thing for mushrooms, particularly with steak. Is there a book or particular resource where I can learn some of the many ways on making mushrooms? I don't mean stuffed...thanks
     
  2. michaelga

    michaelga

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    There are lots of different ways of doing things, most vary by the end result that you are after.  (more info about your desired end result would help but here is a helpful shot in the dark)

    A lot of the classic preparation methods are out-dated and not all that applicable any more.  

    ie. We hardly ever get foraged mushrooms just farmed mushrooms.  Most fresh mushrooms have been refrigerated nowadays.  Mushroom crops are often 'forced' and therefore have much less flavor than wild. etc.

    - don't be afraid of washing mushrooms (they don't soak up moisture - just be sure that any with open gills are drained well, most of the time exposed gill types have them removed anyway)

    - mushrooms that are farmed have less flavour than wild, so boost it by drying them slightly or by using finely ground dried in your dishes (grind yourself after cleaning)

    - start cooking your mushrooms with moist heat and add your fat after the moisture has evaporated at the end of cooking, also be sparing with the fat

    - mushrooms and onions/garlic taste great together but if you're spending the big $$$ on an exotic variety, don't wash them out with herbs, fats and aromatics.

    - likewise if you only have generic white buttons to work with, give them a boost with a bit of dried or other finely chopped fresh ones (ie. a few finely diced morrels sprinkled in a pan of quartered buttons ends at a whole new level and doesn't break the bank)

    - mushrooms can be used in compound butters on steaks for a more subtle approach, also try a riff on gremolatta and also with cheeses (frico's and blue cheese or stinky cheese medallions work well)

    It's late, i'm tired and have a date with a glass of scotch and bed o/
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2012
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    Great advice.......the scotch too.
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Excellent advice from MichaelGa.  Cheftalk is a great resource, we love mushrooms around here.  What are you looking to do with your mushrooms?  We all have great recipes to share for various applications.

    Here are some tips that I've learned about mushrooms

    - wash them with water then leave in a colander to dry for a few hours before you use them.

    - before using as a pizza topping toss them with olive oil and dried herbs and this way they won't dry out on top of your pizza as it cooks.

    - If you want to sear them toss them in a screaming hot pan with a little olive oil.  Don't crowd the pan and don't put salt on them until you plate them, otherwise they will release all their juices.

    - don't use white button mushrooms, any other kind will do.
     
  5. thatchairlady

    thatchairlady

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    On whether to wash or not... one of those questions for the ages... Alton Brown did a demo on one of his shows.  He got out his precision scales and set up 3 scenarios.  Weighed out 3 batches... think plain white mushrooms, but doubt that makes much difference.  Batch 1... just wiped off and dirt.  Batch 2... quickly rinsed.  Batch 3... into bowl of water for several minutes... maybe 5-10?  When weighed after, NO significant difference.  Pretty much debunking the myth that they'd soak up tons of water.  I haven't had many "exotic" varieties... usually white buttons, cerminis or portabellos.

    House dressing at Kimberton Golf Course... in the middle of mushroom territory in PA... tons of thinly sliced raw buttons iin a nice vinegarette.  Think raw might be one of my favorite ways to enjoy mushrooms.  Healthy sub for chips with dips... though not much of a health nut.

    I kiinda stole this recipe from a boardwalk place in Seaside, NJ.  It was an appetizer, but couls easily be the main dish with a salad and bread.  A grilled portabello, toped with a thin slice of grilled chicked, topped with a slice of roasted red pepper, topped with a slab of mozz... melted under broiler.  It was HUGE and yummy.  I've modified recipe several ways... slices of London broil, pounded out medallion of pork tenderloin, thin slice of grilled tuna... different cheeses... some grilled onions, asparagus or other veggies.  With no added meat, would make a great side for steak.
     
  6. michaelga

    michaelga

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  7. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    we use to go into the rain forests in Hawaii and hunt for (pepeiao) woods ear or clowns ear mushrooms

    most delicious in an "Asian style soup" with veg, pork, ‘shrooms, Very ONO!! (delish)
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    I forgot to mention, KK, I took your thought and ran with it,

    about adding oil & herbs to the mushrooms prior to topping your pizza. 

    We like our steak (rib eye) with sauté mushrooms in garlic and the like. 

    What I now do to save on clean up mostly, is skewer them whole,

    (so that they don't run away from you on the grate),

    paint them with olive oil, dust with garlic powder, S&P

    and other assorted herbs that strike me at the moment,

    and grill them along side the meat. 

    DELISH!   
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I'd say even better than dusting with garlic powder is to marinate them with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and real chopped garlic.  That's what I do to my portabelli.

    Another favorite way to prepare mushrooms is to cut them in thin slices and dust with flour, then pan fry.  Serve them with a squeeze of lemon juice.  They're super fun and kids will eat them.  Actually I recently went to a restaurant and they served portabello fries.
     
     
  10. michaelga

    michaelga

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    oh ... now this gives me an idea!

    I now have a date with the fryer after service today!
     
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    [​IMG]  Stuffed Portobello ( put on grill or bake in oven)
     
    indygal likes this.
  12. duckfat

    duckfat

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    Looks like Morel season will come early this year with the warm weather. For most wild mushrooms I soak them in salt water over night to kill any free loaders. Morels that I pick I split in half length wise first as they can have bugs in them. Slugs get after Morels after the rain as well. I guess they like them as much as we do.

    I base the decision to wash or brush based on the variety. There's no reason not to wash white or button mushrooms or even small crimini's. I don't wash portobello's as the gills are delicate.

    I like to toss Portobellos with olive oil, garlic and soy a few minutes before I but them on the grill (cap side down).

    Dave
     
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  13. durangojo

    durangojo

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    eric ripert has a wonderful recipe for portobello fries in his book 'avec eric'. he serves then with  truffled aioli, just in case you thought the mushroom fries by themselves weren't over the top enough!!!  gotta love that man's style!

    joey
     
  14. indygal

    indygal

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    Hmmmmm, this thread reminds me, it rained today and it is supposed to be in the 80's tomorrow.  Perfect time to hunt for morels!   I know of a spot......

    As for how to fix them, we've pretty much fallen in love with tempura batter for frying them.  Cornstarch makes coating extra crispy.

    [​IMG]

    TEMPURA BATTER:
    1/2 cup regular flour (for a healthier batter, you can use spelt or whole wheat)
    1/2 cup cornstarch
    1/2 cup tapioca or rice flour (Note: if you don't have these flours, simply use equal parts cornstarch & regular flour)
    2 Tbsp. baking powder
    1 cup cool or cold water
    1 tsp. sugar
    2 eggs, beaten
    1 Tbsp. fish sauce (or more to taste)

    DD
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  15. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Miss KK, I tried the fresh chopped garlic on the 'shrooms (baby bellas on metal skewers, brushed with EVOO) this evening, but the garlic charred and was a little bitter, did I do something wrong? 
     
  16. chefedb

    chefedb

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    There is a girl on here she goes under the name of Mushroom Girl(she is a caterer) and she picks her own shrooms, and knows quite a bit about them
     
  17. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Oops, so sorry yes of course they would char!  You did not do anything wrong, it was my mistake not to clarify that the garlic has to be wiped off after you marinate them or else... it burns.  Sorreeeee!  Try it again.
     
  18. chefboyarg

    chefboyarg

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    The Wild Table by Connie Green (supplier of mushrooms to the French Laundry) is amazing. It details not only recipes for foraged mushrooms, but also many other wild bits of deliciosity. This may sound a bit cheesy, but her passion for what she does really comes through in the way she writes about each item as well, making for a very easy and entertaining read.
     
  19. samschaperow

    samschaperow

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    Generally, the more mature the mushroom, the more it soaks up water.  But, there are numerous exceptions.

    Sam Schaperow, M.S.

    Forager
     
     
  20. teamfat

    teamfat

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    A while back I was working with tempura, got some good results.  Still could use some fine tuning, though, but here's a couple of mushrooms:


    They were golden brown and delicious!

    mjb.