Lemon / Almond / Chocolate / Kiwi tart - comments needed?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by french fries, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. french fries

    french fries

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    I need to come up with a very nice tart, sweet or savory, as an exercise for school. I've been raking my brain trying to find something that has a bit of originality (doesn't need to reinvent the wheel though), but that's going to work flavor-wise, and then work on a nice presentation. The goal is to present a tart that would make a dessert in a "fine-dining" restaurant.

    After much thinking, and after realizing that I have tons of Meyer lemon in my garden, I've come up with:

    A Meyer lemon curd tart. But with a thin layer of chocolate spreaded onto the crust before pouring the lemon curd. Then maybe use some chocolate shavings and some kiwi slices or 1/2 slices to decorate the top. I could also glaze some lemon skins (rinds?).

    I also thought I could make an almond or hazelnut tart crust, but I'm not sure how that would work flavor wise or if that's not just too many different flavors.

    I thought of a meringue top but I'm not equipped to do it properly (my gas oven is slow, doesn't have a grill, and I don't own a torch).

    I'm also thinking of glazing 3 or 4 Meyer lemon segments and use them to decorate the tart.

    What do you guys think? Does that sound like something you'd want to sink your teeth into? 

    I don't think I've ever seen kiwis used to decorate a lemon tart - is that going to work or is that too much sour on sour? 

    Once I'm set on the tart I'll have to think of plating. Maybe a sauce, or a Cointreau chantilly cream (although I'm not too sure of curd + cream?)...

    Any ideas, inspiration, comments are welcome! Thanks all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2010
  2. mgchef

    mgchef

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    Lemon curd pie and cream sound fine. The only thing I would change up there is the thin layer of chocolate with the lemon on top. I really like mini tarts filled with creme patisserie, and topped with guava, kiwi, or rasberrys.
     
  3. french fries

    french fries

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    Thanks!! So you think that chocolate layer won't go well with the lemon curd? I really want to try it. Maybe I'll make a trial first, see how I like it.
     
  4. jellly

    jellly

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     French Fries - I would encourage you to try the lemon curd and chocolate together, since you are curious about it.  The great thing about culinary school is the opportunity to try new things without the kind of pressures you will have as a professional cook.  
    Personally I don't care for chocolate and lemon or lime, but several successful chocolatiers have paired those flavors in their truffles.  If I were using chocolate with those at all, it would be white.
    However, building a taste memory of flavor combinations is an important step to becoming a good cook.  Even mistakes can be great learning experiences.
     
  5. french fries

    french fries

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    You're right! I would love to develop taste memories where I can better imagine the finished product before doing it. I think I might actually make the whole tart once for us to taste, then adjust and make my final tart. That's the only way I'm going to know how well it all goes together.

    Thanks!
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Chocolate and lemon do not go together, but don't take my word for it -- find out for yourself.  My suggestion is that you try it on your own time, rather than at school.  I wouldn't worry too much about assignments which crash and burn -- to some extent that's what school is for.  However, succeeding is better.

    A citrus which does partner chocolate is orange.  

    For something with a lot of SoCal regional resonance, try integrating a ganache made from Mexican drinking choclate such as Ibarra or Abuelita (already seasoned with cinnamon, almond and vanilla) beneath a  an orange or blood orange curd or creme patisserie.  Or, even swirling two (white chocolate, blood orange) cremes. 

    More challenging would be picking up some serious Oaxacan chocolate from one of the stores on Pico (near Hoover) which is very intense stuff, and working with that. 

    BDL
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    Wow thanks, that's good to know. I was thinking about blood oranges but had given up on the idea as I didn't really know what to do with them or how to put them on a tart, didn't even think about doing a blood orange curd. Interesting!
     
  8. mgchef

    mgchef

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    Yea, lemon and chocolate don't go well together, but there are ways to make it go good together. For example, I've paired lemon with chocolate and ham in a dish and at first my mom heard chocolate and lemon( white chocolate btw) and she told me before dinner she thought it would be terrible. But it turns out that she loved it, and ate the leftovers next day for breakfast.
    What I'm interested in is your blood orange tart. Make mini pie crusts, about 2-3 inches in diameter and bake and let cool. Make a puree of blood oranges and some simple syrup, and add gelatin. Pour into your pie shells and put in fridge.
     
  9. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Could you incorporate the chocolate into the base for the tart?  I don't like the idea of chocolate and lemon together either, but heck - give it a go!  Try it, don't like it?  Don't do it.  I agree, orange and chocolate work better together.  Dunno if you have them there, but the candies called Jaffas here  mix the two flavours so well - yummers
     
  10. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Originally Posted by mgchef  
    No can do Bobbaloo.  One doesn't make an orange puree, at least not successfully.  They're too fibrous.  Instead, you juice the orange and reduce the juice.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2010
  11. mgchef

    mgchef

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     Yea I just noticed that, I just meant blend, strain, and add gelatin in any way you want, then poor