Leaving pancake batter over night?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefkid, Jun 10, 2004.

  1. chefkid

    chefkid

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    Can this adversely affect the chemistry ? The reason is, I like to prepare the batter overnight so I don't have to fumble around in the morning for the tools and mix, etc.

    I haven't tried this before, but I have a bowl mixed and ready for tomorrow morning, and just wondered about the outcome.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The double action of baking powder will be reduced. Any baking soda will have been converted.

    I don't consider it advisable for optimal pancakes. But it only takes a few minutes to whip up in the AM so I don't see what your concern really is.

    Phil
     
  3. mike

    mike

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    Are we talking French or American here?.....I find that leaving French pancake mix overnight will turn it a horrible blueish colour by morning...I agree that it is so quick to make that you should do it fresh.
     
  4. scott123

    scott123

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    If you want to save some time in the morning, the night before put your dry ingredients in one bowl and your wet in another in the fridge. The morning of, combine them.
     
  5. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    In my experience its gotta be fresh!Overnight held pancake batter will not turn into the fluffy american cakes you desire as the puff from the baking powder is almost gone and you will have a chewy rubber type of thing instead of a pancake.Its realy a cheap product for food cost so dont worry , just do it fresh.Doug................
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Though I generally agree with everyone here, pancakes are best when the batter is fresh, I do have a few recipes that improve by sitting overnight. The Lemon Sour Cream Pancakes I make, Multi grain, or Granola Pancakes and a few other flavored pancakes. What I do in these instances though is hold back a few tablespoons of flower and mix it with the baking powder or soda and then sprinkle it over the top of the batter and gently mix it in that morning.
     
  7. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    You can SO tell when the pancake batter has been left overnight.

    You can do yeast pancakes instead. Leave the batter overnight in the walkin.
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Sounds to me that the same traditional strategy is used for making crepe batter: allowing the batter to sit overnight to relieve "grainyness". Also withholding the leavening until the next day sounds like a great idea.
     
  9. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    When I make pancake batter part of the method is beating the eggwhites and yolks seperately and then folding the whites in last. Great batter but it loses its lightness when left overnight. For a pre-made-just-add-water-mix type I buy "Snoqualmie Lodge Pancake Mix"- made by Krusteaz.
     
  10. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Kuan's comment reminded me of the sourdough pancakes I do occasionally. Recipe is here http://www.castbullet.com/cooking/flap.htm No chemical leaveners.

    They stay out all night and spend a little more time in the oven with the light on for final raise before cooking.

    I'm not fond of that guy's starter, but I've got a 'Frisco starter that works well.

    Phil
     
  11. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    You really should mix the soda and powder with the dry ingredients. Otherwise you end up with lumps of baking powder. You don't wanna bite into one of those lumps.

    Kuan
     
  12. chefkid

    chefkid

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    hehe, or rather more like, argh blah peh -- cooking is all about experimenting; needless to say, that particular concotion was a failure. Hey, I had to try.

    The results were less than pleasing, and though it was marginally better tasting than chewing on an old boot, I've decided waking up a few minutes earlier is the better idea.
     
  13. suzanne

    suzanne

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    This is such a good idea, I just wanted to repeat it.
     
  14. mike

    mike

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    I agree...we weigh out six by 5 kilo bread mixes the previous night in tubs so as the pastry chef can crack on as soon as he arrives.