Le Cordon Bleu

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Anyone know if there are any requirements to get into LCB Paris & America besides graduating high school?

I know I have to work in a real kitchen for a few months or something but i dont know the exact amount so if someone could tell me that would be great!

Which book do you think is better?

1. Kitchen Confidential

2. Soul of a Chef

3. Medium Raw

THANKS :D
 
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All three books are different and all 3 are good reading.

         As far as the school, I believe the original is still the best. However it gained its rep. based on yesterdays laurels, before there were good American Schools. America has caught up over the years with the European cuisines and techniques and in some cases surpassed them.
 
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If you're only going to get one book of that list, I'd say get Soul of Chef.

LCB and similar pricey school are a waste of money, IMHO. Without massive experience, you're only going to be able to get a job that won't pay enough to cover student loan debt and the expenses of living.

Also, it's a generally a good idea to work at least a year in the field before committing to any culinary school. You may find out that it's not the work for you.
 
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I am not a chef, merely an enthusiastic amateur!

  I did a LCB Paris course more years ago than I care to remember!  It gave me a great grounding in the various skills, but the schools are now world-wide and I cannot vouch for the level of expertise you would learn.
 
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Thanks guys =]

I have one more question. Would a local restaurant hire a 16 year old? In korea there is an age you have to be to get a job but i forgot what the age was just wondering if there was an age limit for getting a job at a restaurant.

Also seeing how bad the economy in America would my chances of getting a job in America be lower than getting a job in Paris? I mean if I cant get a job would be a miracle if i pay back my student loans.
 
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My wonderful husband recently thought that he wanted to send me to culinary school, and he was exploring different options online.  In a very loud voice from the other room, I heard, "do you know much it cost for just one year at Le cordon Bleu?" 

Yes, I said, I do, that's why I am a home cook.
 
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American economy is probably way better then the French.

You might need to get a work permit, depending on where you are. No clue about age limits. Check at your high school.

You will most likely get some hours at a restaurant, if you a) willing to do the scut work, b) show lots of hustle and good attitude. Give em your number and tell em to call you when the PM dishwasher doesn't show.
 
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ok thanks a bunch!

Anyone know which city has a better food industry?

Los Angeles

Miami

San Francisco

Las Vegas?
 
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I would suggested a book which is called "Professional chef" I know a couple of books too but don't know if you will get in your city or not... 
 
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If I'm not mistaken 16 is normally the age for most states to allow hiring without parental consent.
 
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I don't recommend reading Hell's Kitchen or Medium Raw without reading the other, in that order.
 
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Just a high school graduate will get you started.  Go online or call and request their brochure.  I'm a Baking and Pastry student...started in May.  ENJOY!
 
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Again, questions you have about college are probably best answered by people from the colleges.  Your current high school counselors, too, are probably willing to help you get started too.
 
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When I was looking into LCB in South Korea, and it is the same in the USA, there weren't any special requirements. Like the other culinary schools you will have an internship where you need to work in a kitchen.  They are really good about writing back when you have any questions as well. I suggest you write them an email, that way you can get all of the facts right from them. Good luck in school. I hope this helps a little.
 
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the french actually are very picky on americans or any foreigner in general getting a job in there country, i agree america is probably a way better chance of you getting a job. i graduated from Le Cordon Bleu in minneapolis for pastry arts learned a lot got some amazing receipes but you have to put forward yourself it was too often i saw people slack off and not take advantage of the variety of ingredients we were able to use.
 
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the only reason i know the french thing is because my friend wanted to move to france and either you have to do an Au pair or get married, its very complicated theres a lot of permits to get before in even move let alone get a job
 
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well Its only 25 grand for me i did my generals at a local techincal college transferred those credits and saved about 3000, and the name alone gets you a job. i got hired on the spot at my current job im now the soon to be head decorator at an amazing bistro at the age of 20..
 
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I'd save the money and start washing dishes while letting chefs know that you are interested in working your way up through apprenticeship. Very few people in the industry will be impressed with LCB on your resume. School is important but LCB is just a well marketed brand name, it's not the best place to learn.

Stick to cooks and chefs who you know have something to teach you. It goes both ways.........work hard and source kitchens that have something to give you in return.

Ken Harper
 
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