Latest crop of 'sceintific' food books

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Anyone come across Robert Wolke's What Einstein Told his Cook ? I started on it last week. Rather than a string of topics, like Magee, it is broken into little vignettes covering a spectrum of topics. He speaks to the practical cook as well as the scientist without alienating either.
Also, has anyone taken in Alton Brown's I'm Just here for the Food? His TV presence carries over right into his book; he marries principal, science and theory very well. He uses flash & splash intermingled with bits of insight. Rather than breaking the book into sections on various foods, he adresses cooking methods and their respective dishes. Clever.
Anybody else?
 
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Got Alton's book awhile back, but haven't had time :( to really look it over. Good to know it reflects his terrific show (which I also haven't had time for :mad: ).
Wolke's book is great. He's such a solid, funny, intelligent writer. For the last few weeks, the book has been living in our bathroom :blush: , probably the only time I have time :roll: . And I've noticed our dinner guests tend to spend more time there these days too :D . I know (hope) it's not my cooking, because they come back to the table saying, "Did you know . . .?" One of those books you can open up anywhere and read something helpful.
 
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I love "I'm just here for the food" - I'm not 100% thrilled with the organization of it. Just let me go home so I can try some recipes!
 
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I have not yet had a chance to check out Wolke's book but I do have Alton’s. It’s true his personality really shows threw in the book. Even his pattern of speech is the same. I would definitely recommend the book to anyone that wants more insight into the science of cooking.
Another great book about food science is Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking by Shirley O. Corriher. This one has been out for a while but covers so many topics that I felt it needed to be included in the discussion. I also believe that she was recently a guest on Alton’s show.
 
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Yes, she's the food biochemist or food anthropologist (one of those specialists Alton has popping up on his shows). Here's a link with her picture: Corriher
 
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Shirley Corriher is another reason I'm glad I subscribe to "Fine Cooking" magazine.
 
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I am not familiar w/ Shirley Corriher, but her book is up for bid on eBay for under $5. If you say she is up there with the other guys, I will bid on it. Thanks for the insight.
One of the things I like about Wolke's book, and Brown's for that matter, is that they are less scientifically motivated (dry-ish) compared to Magee. Don't get me wrong, Harold Magee is the Grand Master of Kitchen Theorem, but sometimes it can be hard to build the bridge between his laboratory and the dining room table.
 
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Jim, Shirley's book is my absolute favorite reference...okay, it's not as complete as the professional chef...but it's well written and understandable.

I don't have it in front of me..but she gives like a dozen recipes for pie crust and explains why each one works the way it does. I love the food science...it's my main food interest at this time.
 
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You Alton Brown viewers already know....

Shirley Corriher is a regular contributer and guest (as food science consultant) on Alton Brown's show.



:)
 
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