Last years squash was bored to death

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by the-boy-nurse, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. the-boy-nurse

    the-boy-nurse

    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Squash vine borers got our squash last year. Been watching the underside of leaves closely and got a few. Anybody got suggestions on preventing this years crop from meeting a similar fate?
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    SVBs are, knock wood, the one pest I haven't had to deal with. But I'm told that if you monitor them, you can carefully split the vines where they've taken up residence and flick them out.

    Don't know firsthand if this works, but thought I'd pass it on.
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    176
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Someone once told me to spray the underside of leaves with a strong soap water mix. I don't know if this works on beetles. I do know however  it works on aphids, whiteflies and some mealy bugs.
     
  4. the-boy-nurse

    the-boy-nurse

    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    The wife was able to save one last year using that method. It was the first time we had ever encountered the beasties. Now we at least know they exist. I'm just afraid we may not get em in time.
     
     
  5. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    46
    Exp:
    At home cook
    I noticed it by accident when dealing with a huge invasion of small ants into my kitchen - they set up a full 8-lane highway, complete with four-leaf-clover crossovers and roadsigns, across my kitchen.  I took what was available, a dish detergent, and noticed it killed them on contact, i guess by emulsifying their hard, but fat-based shells.  I've used it on every type of insect invasion on my terrace plants - it only works on contact, and maybe larger beetles may need stronger detergent, but i was even successful with the white cocciniglia infestation i had (another post on this forum about a laurel bush).  I used one of those sprays specifically for cutting grease, and it was necessary later to wash it off, and many of the leaves were ruined, but new ones are springing up and the bush is healthier than ever. 

    While it's not good to eat it, we do use it to wash dishes and stuff we eat on, so rinsing them after the animals are dead should be ok, i imagine. 
     
  6. capsaicin

    capsaicin

    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Puree the most powerful chilis available to you (I get chiltepins from a farmer's market) in a blender with just enough water to cover, strain, and the resulting liquid is a pretty powerful and environmentally friendly insecticide.  You can even throw what you strain out into an appropriate food.

    Just try not to get it in your eye or nose...  And wash your hands thoroughly with soap after you handle the stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2011
    gourmetm likes this.
  7. Iceman

    Iceman

    Messages:
    2,466
    Likes Received:
    408
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I'm not going "mad scientist" here, but a coupla times a year I mix up a solution that I spray everywhere outside my house. It's great for my plants and yard. Everything in it is the cheapest generic brand available. 

    Both green and yellow mouthwash, dish soap, ammonia, "tobacco tonic" (chewing tobacco steeped overnight in 3 gals. water), epsom salt, beer, lemon juice, mothballs. 

    Anyway, I mix all that stuff up and spray it all over everything. I have a very nice gardeny yard. 
     
  8. chrose

    chrose

    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    33
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Ice I am not the least bit surprised that nothing comes near your garden!

    Freaking Japanese beetles are decimating my Green Beans this year. So basically when I am home I go out and knock them into a jar several times a day. I think it's helping because it looks like the leaves are starting to overtake the little buggers!