Last word on food and wine

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Sep 14, 2000.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I'm happy to see the positive response so far with this new topic. If anyone has any comments or input we would love to hear it.
    Remember don't drink and drive, Drink and stay put.
     
  2. greg

    greg

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    Thanks for all the info you and others have been posting. I personally don't care for wine ( give me a Trappist doublebock and I'm happy!), but wine knowledge is important to chefs, so this has been a great learning experience.
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Have you ever had Affligin triple,
    One of the best
     
  4. greg

    greg

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    Affligem isn't technically a Trappist, but I hear it's great. Of the Trappist ales, I've had Chimay, La Trappe and Westmalle. It's difficult to find anything but the La Trappe and Chimay. The abbey style ales ( Affligem falls in this category) are also very good. St. Sebastian's and St. Paul's are two nice ones. I think the best part of working in a German restaurant is that we carry all of these (and many other fine beers) except the Affligem and St Paul's. Ironic, considering the restaurant is in St Paul!

    [This message has been edited by Greg (edited September 14, 2000).]
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Greg,
    Thanks for the info on trappist and abby ales
    theres always so much to learn. I do know that some of the ales iv'e had and enjoyed are. Duval,orvil,Chimay grand reserve, rodenbach,salon,( I think) I love top fermented ales, I think they have more complexcity then others. the wild yeast I understand forms on the top of the vat and collects more wild yeast and then slowly sinks through the vat and ferments the beer, Juring bottling some of the yeast is put in the bottles and actually can develope and age in the bottle for a couple of years.
    does this seem kinda right?
     
  6. greg

    greg

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    Don't know the technicalities of fermenting with wild yeast. I do know that there are some beers that can be aged. Rodenbach is a beer I've got to try; it's a true red, possibly the first commercial offering.
     
  7. ruthy

    ruthy

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    Great new topic. I favor thick heavy reds with almost any food (exceptions being oysters and clams). It is now trendy to drink white wine with cheese. A salty blue cheese goes well with a sauterne. Otherwise I stick to the reds. Most fish dishes can be matched with a pinot noir. Pairing is such an individual thing, especially to wine lovers, that it is very hard to give even the most general guidelines.
     
  8. holydiver

    holydiver

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    Um Ruthy a red is a style of beer.
     
  9. greg

    greg

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    And a style of wine! Everybody wins! [​IMG] A misunderstanding probably caused by my butting into this wine forum with beer. Just couldn't help myself, though; I'm from Wisconsin!