Lard

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Where do I buy lard?  I feel like making pie crusts the old fashioned way.
     
  2. highlander01

    highlander01

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    You should be able to buy it at any local grocery store also look for manteca, it's the same thing just turn the box around and suprise !!! ... LARD
     
  3. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Any Mexican meat market (carneceria) will have lard. Make sure it has very little (if that much) aroma, before buying. The alternative is to order "leaf lard" from a good butcher and render it yourself. Love baking with lard, and fortunately it's easy to get good lard inexpensively here. It's harder in other parts of the country, but NYC being NYC it's there somewhere.

    BDL
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Which part of the grocery store would it be located and what the heck is manteca?

    What type of smell am I looking for or avoiding?

    I have no interest in rendering my own lard lol!
     
  5. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Manteca is the Spanish word for lard. It should be pretty much odorless. You can find it in the same grocery aisle with foods of Latin America/Mexico, in packages similar to the size of a butter box or in a plastic bucket. It doesn't need refrigeration (although I'd refrigerate it, tightly wrapped, after opening). It should be cold when you use it for pastry such as pie dough, so it stays in small bits rather than smearing into the flour.

    Every large supermarket where I live (southeastern Wisconsin USA) has lard in stock.
     
  6. highlander01

    highlander01

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    Manteca is spanish for lard ... I've noticed the last several years that they started putting lard on one side of the box and manteca on the other .... it should also be in the cooking oil isle and depending who put it on the shelf and how much a hurry they were in it will either say lard or manteca.

    Of course if you want to pay extra you can always get it in a hispanic store :p
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Every supermarket around here stocks it, but not always in the same place.

    At Mejier it's on an end-cap in the dairy section. At Kroger it's over by the fresh meats. Etc. You may have to ask for it where you shop.

    Lard comes packed in plastic "buckets" that range in size from one pound (about the size of a whipped-butter container), to three pounds and five pounds.

    One thing to watch for: Some packagers salt their lard. In general you want to avoid that brand.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Ok I will look for that in the grocery store.  It sounds like such a strange thing to put in an apple pie though, is it really good?  What is it made from?
     
  9. highlander01

    highlander01

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    Lard is made from rendered pork fat and is used because it imparts no particular flavor of it's own and makes a very flaky crust and in the south at least is used to make biscuits (yummm)
     
  10. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    is it really good?

    Good doesn't begin to describe it, KK.

    For certain applications, such as pie crust, nothing compares to lard. Shortening, and even butter, run a poor second.

    Why does it make such a difference? I dunno. I'm sure there's a scientific explanation. But the reason doesn't matter. Pragmatically, you will notice the difference right away.

    BTW, I see that lard and butter are now on the good-guys list. This week, anyway. So don't hesitate to fry with the lard. There, again, it adds aunique flavor that isn't available with any other fat or oil.

    The irony is, as Highlander points out, that pure lard has no distinctive flavor of its own. But when combined with other ingredients something magical happens.
     
  11. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Good lard plays much the same role in baking as the parsley in a bouquet garni does in a stock. It's not so much what it brings, as what it doesn't. That is, it leaves a very clean taste.

    It's also better for making flaky pie crusts, biscuits and other flaky goodness things than vegetable shortening and/or butter. That has to do with how the respective substances maintain separation between the layers of surrounding dough, and prevent steam from penetrating from one to the other. Unfortunately, great many people (present company excepted) don't actually know what "flaky" means and confuse it with "tender" instead of contrasting it with "crumbly," much less how to make it happen.

    BDL
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I found it today labeled Morrell, Snow Capped Manteca (Lard) right next to the Crisco, go figure.  Oh boy I can't wait.  And I bet it's healthy too! 
     
  13. highlander01

    highlander01

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  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    right next to the Crisco, go figure.

    Seems to me, KK, that that's the logical place for it. It certainly makes more sense than all the places I find it. I mean, next tothe dairy? What's with that! Anyway, glad you found it.

    .....that claim that lard is healthy for you

    That's what I was talking about, Highlander, when I said it's now on the good-guys list. Until they change their minds yet again! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I just meant that it's not my first time down that aisle KY.  It was right there all along and I'd never seen it.  Never looked for it I suppose.  We only see what we want to see right?
     
  16. carpenter

    carpenter

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    I buy a pound or two of pork fat from my local grocery store and render it myself.  Put it in the freezer just long enough to firm up a bit then cut it into small pieces and place in a thick pan with a bit of water and on medium heat.  I strain it through a paper towel into a jelly jar then refrigerate.  Like salt, it seems to release and amalgamate all the flavors.  When cooking beans or a tomato sauce try throwing a tablespoon in.  Nothing is better for tamale dough, frijoles refrito and of course, pie crust.
     
  17. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    At the grocery stores I frequent you can usually find it floating on the shelves around the meat counter, in the hispanic foods section (both on the shelves or in the coolers by the tortillas) or sometimes over by the oils (this seems to be the less frequent place though).  If you can't find it there just ask.  Chances are they stock it.
     
  18. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    That's an awful lot of work.  I found lard quite cheap at the grocery store.
     
  19. angrybob

    angrybob

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    I believe the Morrell Snowcap lard is hydrogenated, which has the negatives of  the old formula Crisco, or margerine from the health viewpoint. If this is still the case I'm only bringing it up for informational purposes.  When we lived in a city, often it was the only choice for lard, but occasionally non hydrogenated lard was available, usually found in the refrigerated section. In usage I couldn't tell the difference.
     
  20. angrybob

    angrybob

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    I forgot to mention, if it is important to you, just read the label.