Kugelhopf

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by pongi, Nov 29, 2002.

  1. pongi

    pongi

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    I recently got as a present from my hubby (coming back from Alsace) a nice Kugelhopf mold with his lid, and want to try it!
    I have found, both in my books and online, many recipes which seem basically the same but differ on a point: the procedure to make the dough.
    Some of them say you have to make a first dough with the yeast and some flour and sugar, leave it rising, add the other ingredients to make a second dough, leave it rising again, put it into the mold and when grown up put it in the oven. Others just say to make a single dough with all the ingredients and to put it in the mold when risen. Since I have no experience of those types of dough, which method do you think is the best? And which yeast would you recommend to a homecook like me? I'm using a dry brewer's yeast, is it correct?

    I also have another question. My father's nanny used to make a cake she called "Gugelhupf" which looked about the same but had a different taste and texture. According to the recipe it was more something like a Ciambella or a Plumcake: it didn't call for natural yeast and a long time rising, but for baking powder and whisked egg whites into the dough. Since she came from a mountain village close to Sudtirol, do you think it could be an Austrian version of the cake?

    Thanks for your help,

    Pongi
     
  2. isa

    isa

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    First I should tell you I’ve never made a Gugelhupf, Kougloff or Kugelhopf. It’s one of those thing I keep telling myself I have to try, that is why I was so intrigued by your question and decided to look it up. Here’s what I found:


    There is an Austrian Gugelhupf, here is what I found in Rick Rodgers’ Kaffeehaus:


    Keeping up the tradition of quaint Viennese culinary tales, some source say that the Gugelhupf’s design was modelled after the fold in a Turk’s turban; thus eating a turban-shaped cake showed hatred for the enemy.


    Actually, the wavy design in a Gugelhupf dates back to the roman times – bronze moulds have been found throughout the Roman Empire in almost the same pattern – and it is assumed that the marking are meant to symbolise the rays of the sun. There are a few ways that the word could derived. In Austrian dialect, Gugl means bandanna and Kopf means head, and the mould does look like something a worker would tie around his head. In German, Kogel means peak, another reference that is easy to see. Germans spell the cake Kugelhopf, as do the French. The cake arrived in France via Alsace and the Austrian members of the French court.


    Gugelhupf acquires its revered status in Austrian history as one of the favourite dish of Emperor Franz Joseph. During the summer, when his court was ensconced in Bad Ischl, it was his habit to end his morning walk at the villa of his great friend, the actress Katharina Schratt, where she always had homemade, freshly baked Gugelhupf waiting for him. In case there was an unforeseen accident in her kitchen, she always had a backup order from Zauner, the town’s premier bakery.


    In this book there are three Gugelhupf recipes: Poppy seed, banana and marble Gugelhupf. All three recipes call for baking powder.


    In Classic Home Desserts there is one recipe for a Cinnamon Kugelhopf that is said to go from Jeanine and Georges Vongerichten, Jean-Georges’ parents who are from Alsace. In the introduction the authour points out that unlike traditional Kugelhopf this recipe does not contain eggs this is said to bring the butter flavour forward. The Cinnamon Kugelhopf is made with active dry yeast.


    Another Alsatian Kugelhopf, found in The Bread Bible is made with active dry yeast.
     
  3. pongi

    pongi

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    Thanks a lot Isa!
    Very interesting info!
    BTW, I found in an Austrian cookbook another recipe that also calls for baking powder and whisked eggs, so suppose that this may be the Austrian version, while the French have opted for a brioche-like recipe (that sounds obvious...),
    Yesterday I gave my first try to the "French" recipe but I'm not fully satisfied with the result. Although the dough seemed to rise properly and filled all the mold in a reasonable time, the texture of the cooked cake was not perfect and, most of all, NOT brioche-like (it seemed more a sort of sweet bread). Since I have no experience of brioche dough, could you help me?

    You have already got GREAT results with cream puff pastry, so I look forward to your advice :bounce:

    Pongi
     
  4. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Wow, it's been at least 20 years since I've eaten one.....but as I recall (I still have my Mothers recipe) that her's was more cake like then bread like... I also think the reason I haven't continued making them was they always stuck to the pan.

    It depends upon what you like, personally I lean to the sweet side of any pastry. But traditionally Europeans like yourself would favor a less sweet version, with the yeast.

    P.S. The sweet way doesn't require a lid.
     
  5. pongi

    pongi

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    A few years ago, my hubby made a "cake-like" Gugelhupf (using a pudding mold since we hadn't the gugelhupf mold yet) that was excellent and just like the one I remembered from my family. I couldn't remember where did he found the recipe, but he has reminded me it was from that Austrian book I have mentioned. So, I know this way we (or, at least, my hubby ;) ) can make a good cake like Gugelhupf...but, since our mold comes from Alsace, I was tempted to try a local recipe!
    I couldn't say which version I like more, since they're in fact two different things and I could never decide whether I like more a plumcake or a brioche. BUT, I just realized that making a good brioche dough is a hard job for an amateur like me...and would love to know some helpful trick :)

    Pongi
     
  6. pongi

    pongi

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    BTW...Wendy, even if we already have a good cake like recipe I would be glad to verify if your mother's one does really stick to the pan ;) as I can't believe that anything you do turns out badly...

    Pongi
     
  7. angrychef

    angrychef

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    Hi Pongi. The gugelhopf that I've made and tried has been the sweet yeast dough. Texture and taste similar to pannetonne with raisins soaked in quite a bit of rum. I remember seeing Martha Stewart's mom making one on her tv program. Wouldn't hurt to check out the recipe in her website. Let us know when you've come up with the version that you like.
     
  8. isa

    isa

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    I don't have a vast experience in making brioche, did it a few times and that's about it. Maybe Kyle could advise you on this matter. I did looked up brioche in a few books and here's what I found...


    Brioche is not a fussy dough, but it does take a little time. Kneading the dough thoroughly and letting it rise overnight in the refrigerator ensure a moist loaf, full of flavours, with a fine, delicate and tender crumbs.

    Be sure to use good-quality butter for this recipe: a poor-grade brand with a high moisture content will throw off the balance and flavour of the bread. Both the butter and the eggs should be as fresh as possible.

    From: In The Sweet Kitchen by Regan Daley


    I do not recommend making brioche by hand. An electric mixer with a dough hook is ideal. Not the food processor, however. The heat from the processor could melt the butter.

    From : The New French Baker


    For a few ABC's f brioche making: always make sure your butter is very soft (but not greasy) before adding it to the dough.

    Beware: This dough requires a lengthily mixing time to properly develop, often causing the mixer to jump around on the counter.

    And: Careful, don't let your mixer overheat, and never place it too close to the edge of the counter.

    From: Pastries From The La Brea Bakery.


    When a formula calls for lots of fat, whether butter, shortening or oil, it is usually beneficial to wait until the gluten has had an opportunity to develop before adding the fat. If the fat is added at the beginning, it coats the protein fragments (giladin and glutenin) and makes it difficult for them to bond into the longer stronger gluten molecule. Wait 5 minutes before incorporating the fat to allow complete hydration to occur.

    Of course there are cakelike variations of brioche in which butter is intentionally added with the flour to create a very tender, tight-crumbed bread, almost like pound cake. If you desire this texture or application, simply add the butter early on and ignore the chill-down step, transferring the batter, with a spoon or a spatula, to a greased pan right after the primary fermentation.

    From: The Bread Baker's Apprentice
     
  9. w.debord

    w.debord

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    I'll have to dig into my older files, but I'll post when I find it.
     
  10. breadster

    breadster

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    you've all got me on a kugelhopf quest now-

    there was an article in the local paper for one- i tried it- cept i was too impatient to wait for my butter to thaw correctly and it turned out a disaster

    what's the difference between that and the Italian panettone ?

    i just bought a plain panettone- no fruit- the kind with a year shelf life from italy-- how do they do that? it was brioche like
     
  11. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I think some of the imported panettone are naturally leavened. If you see the word "levain" on the box, then it is.
    Brioche is not that hard to make. It's like a fattened-up challah. I never hold it overnight as I don't like the way the dough stiffens up, but the one I make can be a little bit intimidating in it's softness. I make kugelhopf like coffee cakes with it.
     
  12. breadster

    breadster

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    the imported panettone is naturally leavened-- how is naturally leavened different from "unnaturally leavened"

    it contains natural yeast among eggs, sugar, butter, flour....

    and what makes a cake stay fresh for 6 months? -(that is the exp date)
    the packaging is simply a twist-tied cello bag in a fancy paper box
     
  13. isa

    isa

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    The baker would use levain instead of yeast (levure).
     
  14. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Here's my Mothers recipe:

    1 c. butter
    2 c. sugar
    6 egg yolks
    2 tsp. baking powder
    1/2 tsp. salt
    6 tbsp. milk
    2 tsp. lemon peel
    1 1/2 c. sifted cake flour

    Mixed, then fold in:

    6 egg whites, whipped

    bake 375

    xxxsugar when cool.