Korean-style Sponge Cake

4
1
Joined Sep 25, 2021
Recently I watched a video of large-scale production of Korean strawberry cream cakes. They're essentially Genoise filled w/ whipped mascarpone cream and lots of strawberries. In the video they added flour directly to the mixing bowl with eggs, sugar, and invert sugar (I assume) and whipped until full volume. I've never seen someone make sponge this way and thought that whipping the flour for so long would develop too much gluten. Even if it's a low-protein flour, I think you'd still end up with a tough result? I want to try it out but I'm almost certain the result will be an over-mixed, tough cake. Am I missing something, or is there some trick?

P.S. I've seen many other Korean pastry chefs make sponge the traditional way, and I went to culinary school with lots of students from Asia. So I really don't think it's just a cultural difference in how we prepare cake. It just seems like an odd technique that I'm intrigued by because it would make production easier! Thanks in advance.
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
825
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Joined Jun 15, 2006
Recently I watched a video of large-scale production of Korean strawberry cream cakes. They're essentially Genoise filled w/ whipped mascarpone cream and lots of strawberries. In the video they added flour directly to the mixing bowl with eggs, sugar, and invert sugar (I assume) and whipped until full volume. I've never seen someone make sponge this way and thought that whipping the flour for so long would develop too much gluten. Even if it's a low-protein flour, I think you'd still end up with a tough result? I want to try it out but I'm almost certain the result will be an over-mixed, tough cake. Am I missing something, or is there some trick?

P.S. I've seen many other Korean pastry chefs make sponge the traditional way, and I went to culinary school with lots of students from Asia. So I really don't think it's just a cultural difference in how we prepare cake. It just seems like an odd technique that I'm intrigued by because it would make production easier! Thanks in advance.
There was a sponge I used to make that incorporated that mixing method, but it involved a hi-ratio cake shortening called "Fluid Flex". The recipe and the cake shortening were new to me and I was incredulous when I first had to make it because I thought for sure I'd come out with hockey pucks. But they were some of the most tender cakes I've ever made.

I know genoise has very little, if any fat in it, so the cakes weren't technically genoise, but since most cake mixing methods have you adding the flour at the end to inhibit gluten development, any time you read a recipe that has you mixing the flour in to death from the beginning makes you question it.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is maybe there is a specific ingredient they are using (like the Fluid Flex in my case), that is primarily responsible for the surprising results.
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
825
245
Joined Jun 15, 2006
OK. I watched the video......and......I'm not seeing them whipping the flour with the eggs for minutes on end. In fact, you see them weighing and sifting the flour, then there's an edit that goes right to the mixer where you see either the finished batter being whipped at the end, or it's just the yolks when when they've reached ribbon stage......it's hard to tell. But there's no evidence that the batter is being whipped too long with the flour added. I'm not seeing it. To me, it looked like the standard method for making a genoise.

What I saw was mixers with no annoying safety cages. THAT'S what *I* want. :p:p
 
50
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Joined Aug 22, 2021
Would you believe I've seen that video before. I was scratching my head as to why anyone would go wild for that cake, even going so far as to make reservations. what gives?
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
825
245
Joined Jun 15, 2006
Would you believe I've seen that video before. I was scratching my head as to why anyone would go wild for that cake, even going so far as to make reservations. what gives?
Well, it's Korea, so........I do know those that are of the Asian persuasion love their not-too-sweet desserts with fruit. Besides, you can create hype around just about anything to sell it. There's a particular type of salmon where I live that come out of the Copper River in Alaska. Everybody seems to think "Copper River Salmon" is the best salmon and people clamor over it when the year's catch is announced. Restaurants announce "Copper River Salmon is HERE!" and people go bananas. Well, my husband goes out and fishes quite a bit and we've had all kinds of salmon and we get to eat it fresher than most people do. We know that Copper River Salmon isn't better than any other salmon.......it's the hype and the fact that most people don't know any better that keeps the mystique alive.

My guess is that bakery created hype around what is actually a well-made dessert made with quality ingredients, and it keeps 'em coming.
 
4
1
Joined Sep 25, 2021
OK. I watched the video......and......I'm not seeing them whipping the flour with the eggs for minutes on end. In fact, you see them weighing and sifting the flour, then there's an edit that goes right to the mixer where you see either the finished batter being whipped at the end, or it's just the yolks when when they've reached ribbon stage......it's hard to tell. But there's no evidence that the batter is being whipped too long with the flour added. I'm not seeing it. To me, it looked like the standard method for making a genoise.

What I saw was mixers with no annoying safety cages. THAT'S what *I* want. :p:p
Ok I was thinking the same thing after watching it again lol. Weird editing. Anyway thanks for the tip about Fluid Flex!
 
4
1
Joined Sep 25, 2021
Would you believe I've seen that video before. I was scratching my head as to why anyone would go wild for that cake, even going so far as to make reservations. what gives?
I wouldn't line up to buy it either, but it does look high-quality (the fruit is beautiful!) and maybe it's just something 'different' for Koreans. Maybe they're like WHY would Americans wait in line for Bibimbap?! It's just something new and fun. Although, I've seen a lot of Korean pastry shops online, and it seems like there are plenty of options, making this cake nothing 'special'. Some impeccable laminated doughs, beautiful cakes, etc. When this pandemic ends I'd like to go!
 

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