Knock Out Spuds

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by kaneohegirlinaz, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    There is a thread in the Pro forum ‘knock-out mashed potatoes’

    Two potato recipes came to my mind, both of them were given to me by my two SIL’s, I love potatoes

    Home cooks bring a lot to the table

    8 baked Potatoes, jackets left on

    8 pcs Bacon-crisp-crumbled

    1 – 1 ½ C shredded Cheddar cheese

    ½ C Mayo

    ½ C Ranch Dressing

    1 bunch Green Onions, chopped

    Mash taters w/skins on, add all but last ingredient, mix well w/spoon

    Spread into a buttered baking dish

    Bake for 45 minutes at 350⁰

    Top with Green Onions


    5 lbs Potatoes-peeled-quartered

    6 oz shredded Cheddar Cheese

    ½ stick (4 Tbsp) Butter, melted

    1 C Sour Cream

    2 Eggs, beaten

    1 C Green Onions, chopped

    4 pcs Bacon-crisp-crumbled

    ½ - 1 C Milk

    S&P

    Boil taters until tender, drain, return to hot pot, mash until smooth, stir in 1 ¼ C cheese, sour cream, milk & eggs until just blended.  Add ¾ C Green Onions, ½ of the crumbled Bacon, S&P to taste.

    Spread into a butter baking dish (at least 3 qt.) bake at

    350⁰ for 40 minutes, top with remaining onion & bacon
     
  2. durangojo

    durangojo

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    k girl,    why do they call them jackets? are they cold?

    personally i love simple mashers...by hand with a hand masher..not too much butter, but enough, and i use  some of the potato water to stand in for almost all of the cream..kosher salt and cracked pepper is a biggie....at the restaurant  we serve jalapeno cheddar mashers as a side but thats cuz i've done the roasted garlic ones or the herbed ones, ranchero ones, green chile ones to death over the years...my potatoes of choice  are yukons and red creamers...at the fancy pants resturants i've cooked in the potatoes are milled and 'duchessed' but what an abosoute pain they are to make and personally i like the feeliing and taste of mashed by hand potatoes better...hey, what do the rich know anyway?

    joey
     
  3. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Joey-girl you crack me up!

    I was trying for be fancy pants-European… yeah right!

    But I’m with you sista’, no need be she-she, it’s just food!

    You know, I tried a food mill once, there was so much food-stuffs left behind, I felt like I was wasting food.  The skins are where most of the nutrients are and they taste dang good too.
     
  4. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    I hear ya on the skins, K~Girl, the reason a lot of kitchens/restaurants leave them out, is PURELY for aesthetics. I leave 'em on at home, it's easier, I LIKE the skins, and personally the look doesn't bother me.

    The Food mill may leave a little behind, but like mentioned in the other thread, a chimoise/fine sieve/tamis will do the same. The work level is MORE, but the end results are SO much lighter, fluffier, and just melt in your mouth good. If you were to use a mill, or chimoise, just use a plastic scrapper/dough scrape/board cleaner to get all the bits.

    The key to ANY great spud, imo, is the texture. If you over work your spuds, you will(just like in making bread dough)develop gluten, and end up with glue. Just whip until all ingredients are Incorporated, and STOP. They should be able to hold a peak, and stand a spoon up in.

    Some house batch flavors we go for: The traditional "Loaded" Smashed Potato: Yukon's, boiled in salted water, smashed with milk, butter, salt and pepper, then fold in sour cream, diced bacon, green onion, sharp cheddar. You can even pipe these onto a sheet pan, and brown off under a broiler for more flavor/visual appeal.

    Skinned Russets, boiled 'til fork tender, butter, S+P, a little cream, Parmesan cheese, fresh thyme, and roasted garlic(mix in at the end, leave the garlic a little chunky). 

    While it's not "Mashed" potatoes, I love to just oat fingerlings in duck, or bacon fat, roast until tender, and then smack em gently with the bottom of a clean pan, making truly SMASHED potatoes. Season liberally with salt and pepper, then, deep fry until the exploded sides are golden and crispy. Just top with Sour Cream, and some cheese, and MAN, So good, day break yo mouth! SO ONO!
     
  5. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Uhm, no.  I disagree.  The skins also add a dirt flavor as well as a papery gritty texture.  Me do not like skins in my mash.
     
  6. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    They don't when the potatoes have been cleaned properly.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    No skins in my mash either. I still like garlic mashed potatoes. Gently cook the peeled garlic cloves in butter over low heat until soft while the potatoes cook. Simple and very good. Milling is best with garlic cloves as that breaks the cloves up into the potatoes.

    Yukons add a lot of visual pop with the appearance of butter. I don't think they taste that much different in mashed potatoes. I usually do russetts for mashed potatoes.

    I usually mash by hand as I like a little more texture in my mashed potatoes than the perfectly smooth results of the food mill. On the other hand, cooking the potatoes whole in their skins gives a better flavor with less absorbed water. And the food mill handles removing the skins for you.
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    This can be true Miss KK.  I have found that some of the spuds that I’ve purchased

    in the past do have that dirt and paper quality to the skins. 

    On one occasion the taters had actual mud still left on them. 

    So I took my dish brush (I do not know a vegetable brush)

    and scrubbed the HECK out that bugger.    

    I found a different brand in the bag type of what they call premium

    golds, reds and russets at some megamarts, but not all. 

    The skins left on were pretty good, better than the other non-premium brands.

    My sister and I like chunky mashed and DH prefers the smooth texture

    as Jono describes (and I hate to clean those dang food mills!)
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Sorry but I still disagree.  I know how to clean a potato, trust me.  The texture of munching the potato skin in my mouth makes me feel like I'm eating paper.  And even if it is cleaned within an inch of its life it still adds flavor to the mash, a very earthy flavor.  I personally do not like them and I take issue with the poster that said that "skins are moved PURELY for aesthetic reasons" because my taste buds tell me otherwise. 
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
  10. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Some people like some don't.It's what makes us all individuals.
     
  11. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    You can take issue all you want, when a Chef wants a purely WHITE potato/mashed, THAT is why the skins are removed, for a cleaner presentation. You will also find that a LOT of European Chefs remove the skins, because New Potatoes(used a LOT in the USA), are used to feed farm animals, and are not considered "People" food, so it's a bigger spud, with the skin removed. Of course, here in the states, skins can go either way, as has been proven by the posters in this thread. Honestly, a salt crusted baked potato, my favorite part of it IS the skin, crispy, roasted, salty goodness. If it's clean, it is NOT gritty, and I guess you can say it does have an earthy quality, but so does good Scotch. . .LOTS of things in the food world have "earthy" qualities, heck, think of mushrooms.

    To each their own, as stated.
     
  12. scubadoo97

    scubadoo97

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    When doing baked I'd rather eat the skin after its hollowed out. "best part dad" my kids would say sarcastically
     
  13. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    lqtm

    my Mom would said to us girls,

    'oh no, you don't like those skins, they're nasty, give those to Mommy'

    then she'd take my sister's and my skins after we'd eaten the baked flesh, loaded them down with butter, pepper and plenty of salt and just pick them up with her hands and munch away...

    I never tasted a potato skin until I was in College and moved out on my own, love those loaded potato skins (thanks <edit> TGI fridaysfor your skins and Bartenders Ice Tea!!)

    ::chuckle::

    Miss KK, I tried your method of roasting the taters, covered in tin foil with the Rosemary, YUM!!!  Mister K~girl was impressed!!  thanks girl!
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  14. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Jono, I'm going to try your technique of piping the mash on to a tray and browning the tops,

    that would be a great way to 'hold' the spuds for a holiday dinner!  raosted garlic, top with some parm, ono (good)  brah!
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I don't take issue with whether it's good or not, I fully understand that some people like skins on and some like skin off.  I take skins off because I don't like the taste and texture.  It's not done for aesthetic reasons as you say.  I didn't say earthiness was bad, I said I don't want it in my mashed potatoes.  All potatoes are people food, I won't consider even for a second that "european" chefs, as you vaguely describe, peel potatoes for that reason.  Chefs are doing marvelous things with animal feet, offal and the like but they don't consider a potato people food?  Absurd.
     
  16. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Glad it worked out... no water right??
     
  17. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Oh no, that reminds me of catering hall mashed potatoes. 
     
  18. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    You have clearly missed my point, completely.
     
  19. durangojo

    durangojo

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    simply somes down to, 'are you a jet or a shark' ?

    joey

    for those of you too young..it's 'west side story'...if i have to explain what that is, forgetaboutit!
     
  20. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    LOL, very true too. What if you were brought up Shark, but feel more Jet at heart? Oh these poor, cursed potatoes, they will forever be facing my duality!