Knives for fiance.. Question

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by ashly744, Dec 7, 2016.

  1. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Hello there. I was wondering if anyone could assist me?

    My fiance has mentioned wanting some new knives, particularly a chef's knife and a good set of steak knives. He mentioned a meat cleaver too, but we don't do any heavy chopping (or bone slicing).

    However, I'm really confused. I've been researching these knives for days and I can't figure out which direction to go. I originally thought Wusthof because he really wants a German made knife, but I also read reviews that Victorinox may be better? 

    Any thoughts or different suggestions for a good chef's knife and steak knives? Thank you!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif  
     
  2. foody518

    foody518

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    Hi ashly, welcome to CT

    There are a lot kitchen knives out there. Do you have a rough budget range? What kind of cutting tasks will these be needed for? What kind of grip and cutting motions are most frequently used? What size and kind of cutting board is being used?
    Any input you can give to better tailor guidance and recommendations helps.
     
  3. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Hello! Thanks for the response. These are all really good questions and I'll try to answer them without asking him (he'll suspect otherwise) and I'm trying to keep this a surprise.

    We do a lot of cooking at home, just no heavy cutting (like through bone). We cook a lot of meats, chop a lot of veggies, herbs, etc. I'm really looking for a good chefs knife, a filet knife, and a better set of steak knives. He's mentioned a meat cleaver but I'm not sure why we would use that if we aren't slicing through bone? I don't really have a budget right now, but would like to keep each item around $100ish. I don't mind buying individual items and can spend a little more if neeeded. I just want to make sure it's good quality. He has a Japanese style knife at home but has expressed interest in a German made knife because he feels the other knife is getting too much use for every day cooking tasks. We have a small and medium sized cutting board at home.

    I've done some research but I'm starting to get confused on all the different knives out there. Thank you!
     
  4. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Everyday cooking tasks is what kitchen knives are made for...

    Probably a meat cleaver so he CAN start hacking through bones.  I recommend this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/THAI-KITCHE...140128?hash=item210b37ffe0:g:-RcAAOSwmmxW4CQq

    I've used mine for 2 years as a beater knife.  It has handled turkey bones,  pork bones, squash, lobster.  This thing is a tank made by a machete company.

    Filet knife - 

    Steak knives you have a few options

    - get shitty serrated knives that handle the abuse of cutting on plates.  Don't sharpen them and when they dull toss them.

    - get a long slicer and cut your meat on a board in the kitchen then plate it nicely (my way)

    - get nice expensive steak knives and wooden plates, learn to sharpen these knives
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  5. ashly744

    ashly744

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    He knows it's for everyday cooking tasks but he feels the knife is more delicate and wanted to upgrade to something that could handle more.

    You're right. He probably does want to start hacking stuff.

    We have a set of henckels steak knives but I wanted to surprise him with a nicer set. I do like your idea of a long slicer, too.

    I'll look at your links. Thanks again.
     
  6. foody518

    foody518

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    If it's handling the every day tasks then how/why is it delicate? If it feels not durable you can put a more conservative edge on the knife
    I will say that the typical rocking/walking technique for mincing herbs is not the best for some of the really thin behind the edge, harder and more brittle steeled knives (in that it accelerates edge wear)
    Filet - meaning for fish or for meat with bones?
    I've got a cleaver from the same folks as the link Millions put up above. It get used for coconuts. Be aware that it is not stainless, so don't leave it out wet - clean and dry in a timely manner. My Japanese chefs knives handle melons and the little squash and pumpkin I eat
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  7. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Foody518 - as far as the knife goes I'm not sure. He says there's little chips on the blade. He says the German made knives would be more durable? We use our current knife for cutting fruit (melons), chopping, dicing and cutting (meats, veggies). I'll attach a photo below of the current knife we have.

    The filet knife would be for meat with bone. Or for even thinning out thick slices of meat. He's mainly expressed wanting a new chef knife, meat cleaver and new steak knives. I thought the filet knife might be a good addition.

    As of right now I do most of the cooking in the house, but he's almost finished with his degree and he's been talking about cooking more while I finish out my nursing degree, so I wanted to be sure to get him knives that are good.

    Here's the picture of our current knife. I don't remember the name.


    Thanks again for the help and the links provided!
     
  8. ashly744

    ashly744

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    I did ask him again and he says the blade is thin and you can see some small divits. He thinks he may have been handling it wrong when slicing meat. He is wanting a German knife for the shape of the blade and angle. So a wider blade I guess? Or maybe I just need to get him a cleaver for meat? But he also mentioned using the cleaver for dicing. He wants a heavy one.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  9. benuser

    benuser

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    You don't want a wide blade with meat, a typical slicer is narrow so it doesn't cause dragging.
     
  10. benuser

    benuser

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    [​IMG]
     
  11. foody518

    foody518

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    Have y'all sharpened a few times past the initial factory edge? It does not surprise me to see a more brittle (maybe too thin), chip-prone initial edge. But that kind of chip (the one on the curve towards the tip) also looks to me like there was possibly some twisting action going on (twisting in a hard dense food, or digging and twisting into the cutting board). A German knife may hold up better, or you might simply see a bent out of true portion analogous to where the chip is, and both are indications of damage at the edge. 

    Boning knife primarily for cutting out & separating between bone and meat, or also for taking off the silver skin.

    (Open question: What are folks using for portioning thicker cuts of meat?)

    Meat cleaver if he's wanting to cut through bone as opposed to boning/jointing. 
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The knife you have is probably from one of the OEM makers, who rebrand their knives for many different sellers, probably VG-10 steel and not properly heat treated and therefore chippy.  I have my doubts as to whether the edge is in actuality too thin.  There are few companies that do a good job with this steel, and you pay for it, and there are better steels for the price.

    Your man's technique might be a little lacking and that would add to the chipping problem.  When cutting on the board you need to control your power to minimize slamming, and you especially want to eliminate all twisting motions.

    This knife is plenty enough rugged and way better than any German steel: https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/products/gesshin-uraku-240mm-stainless-wa-gyuto

    But a MAC chefs knife will do for you very well and cost much less:



    Thouh I believe you'll get more joy of the Uraku.

    And maybe he wants a bigger knife also to go along.  This one is again better than your typical German, in terms of blade, but actually the company is in a primarily German speaking country, Switzerland, and the price is right also:



    But any knife/cleaver you get will still have to be sharpened properly.

    So spend your money their as you can save it on your other items, like the cleaver and steak knives.

    There is no sense in getting "good" steak knives, they are expensive and require sharpening. All non-serrated knives, good or not so good, have to either be used on wood plates, or used in such a way the you only allow the tip to touch the plate.  And even non-serrated Henkles will cut well if you keep them sharp.

    For serrated these at least look good.  Don't go for the very cheapest though, they will be poor imitations of Laguiole knives instead of decent imitations.

    http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...ives.TRS0&_nkw=laguiole+steak+knives&_sacat=0
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
    foody518 likes this.
  13. ashly744

    ashly744

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    I don't do the sharpening with the knives, but he does. So I am not sure if he's gone past the initial factory edge. He has admitted that he may have been handling it wrong. He did use the knife to cut the turkey on Thanksgiving and there was some twisting motion going on. He thought the German blade would handle better, but he did admit that he may need to work on how he was handling the knife. So, that does make sense. 

    Do you have any meat cleavers you would recommend? 
     
  14. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Thanks for the link and the suggestion! Will this knife do everything required? From chopping vegetables to slicing meat? And you're right on the steak knives. I decided earlier today to wait on the steak knives and spend the extra money on a new chef's knife or meat cleaver. If I got the knife you recommended, do you think a cleaver would still be needed? If so, do you have any recommendations? Thanks! These replies have really been helpful.
     
  15. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Thank you for your reply. This is really helping. He did admit that he may have been handling the knife wrong which probably helped with the chipping. You're right on the steak knives. I decided earlier to hold off on them and spend the extra money towards a new chef's knife or meat cleaver. I really liked the first knife you posted. It looks like something that he would get a lot of use out of. Do you have any suggestions for meat cleavers, or do you think it is needed?
     
  16. ashly744

    ashly744

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    This is your knife? Who makes it?
     
  17. ashly744

    ashly744

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    This is your knife? Who makes it?
     
  18. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Millions is especially the cleaver expert around here, what he says is spot on I believe.  I added some more information to my post above you might find helpful.
     
  19. benuser

    benuser

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    Robert Herder, carbon Tranchelard, 1922 series
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016
  20. ashly744

    ashly744

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    Perfect. Thank you again. I really appreciate everyone's help.