Knife Sharpening Secrets - Japanese Knives

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Making a traditional Japanese knife is a process where no step is more important than the other. This process takes time, time that we sometimes think we do not have in modern society. But when a master does something, he takes the time to do it well and he will not sacrifice quality on the altar of speed.

There are two categories of traditional handmade Japanese knives: The Honyaki, meaning “true forged”; The Kasumi, referring to “Mist” or “Fog”; The Gyuto is in it's own category, because it is a nontraditional handmade knife.

Modern Japanese masters have reached perfection, changing not only the internal structure of the steel knife chef, but his geometry.


[h1]The shape of the knife blade and the inner steel structure define ways and methods of sharpening.[/h1]
 
 
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31
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Dear Ser. 

Thank you.
I think that the knives as the people are very individual. Everyone has their own preferences and standards.
After the form knives are divided into two classes, the composition of steel: Stainless steel and Сarbon.
The approaches, methods and the desired result for them will be very different at one and toyzhe blade geometry.
Have you come across the term «kirenaga - 切 れ 長 - sharpness duration (time a knife stays sharp)»?
 
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Structure steel kitchen knife is characterized primarily kinds of carbides, their size, the amount and uniformity of distribution, shape and hardness.



(http://www.uddeholm.com/files/TB_grinding-english.pdf)

Тhe most expensive (unique) steels contain carbon nanotubes.
[h1]DISCOVERY OF NANOTUBES IN ANCIENT DAMASCUS STEEL[/h1]
http://img0.liveinternet.ru/images/...880__springer_proceedings_in_physics_127_.pdf

http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/3//4171/4171040_reibold2006.pdf
 
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Dude - welcome to Cheftalk  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif   That said we're all knife knuts here so you're like preachin' to the choir.  
 
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Not quite sure my brain is properly consuming this data but it is interesting nonetheless. Welcome to CT, as Mike9 said, were all knife knuts here so the information is intriguing to say the least...
 
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После того, как мы понимаем , что это сталь, вы можете начать урок №1.
Спасибо за понимание.
 
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I do appreciate the videos in que in the previous, but the next video shows an important feature for power production.  You'll notice the grip does not employ the index finger, nor is the thumb wrapped tight.  Go play with it and develop understanding of this in terms of proper mechanics.
 
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Very sharp, easy to use and maintain kitchen knife determines the taste of the prepared dishes (http://www.toishi.jp/microworld_20131007/hikaku.html).

Since ancient times, the main diet in Japan consisted of fish and vegetables. A good example is the preparation of traditional Japanese cuisine from rice with acetic seasoning and various seafood. Knife with unsatisfactory performance cutting, will facilitate the allocation of chopped raw fish odor. The aesthetic appearance and taste will also be unacceptable to traditional Japanese cuisine. For example, the traditions of French cuisine, the taste of sliced ​​products is largely determined by the shape and size of grinding used vegetables, fruits, etc., as well as the quality of the knife cuts:
- Varied taste can be obtained from the same products using various methods of grinding;
- From knife cut surface quality depends not only on the taste of food (salad, etc.), but also the duration of validity for nutritional prepared in fruit and vegetables;
- Cutting products and their methods of heat treatment due to non-uniformity of size and shape, contribute to disparities in the uniformity of the passage of the physical and chemical processes in the preparation of dishes.

THE HONYAKI (本焼)

@The Honyaki is the knife that legends and myths are made of. This series of knives is a treasured part of Japanese Cultural heritage. The Honyaki is not intended for the casual chef. Traditionally, a Japanese Chef purchases a Honyaki knife after completing his or her apprenticeship. To celebrate this achievement, a silver ring may be placed between the buffalo bolster and the wooden mahogany handle. In Japanese tradition, it is considered very poor taste for a Chef to use the Honyaki before his or her apprenticeship is completed. 
The Honyaki is an object of admiration that represents a long history of Japanese pride and craftsmanship. Encoded in the steel are centuries of experimentation, and a commitment to perfection. The Honyaki is forged from a single piece of steel, using the traditional method of differential hardening and tempering. The Japanese have developed a method to insulate parts of the knife, so that the metal cools at different rates. There is no room for error, lest the blade be destroyed. Only blacksmiths of great skill can master this method. It is so specialized, Master Hide uses a different blacksmith for each type of steel. 
There exists a belief that Japanese knives are very hard to sharpen; only in this case, is it true. The edge of the Honyaki is so hard, it will break, chip, or crack if dropped or abused. While the blade is delicate, it is also true that the harder the edge, the longer it maintains its sharpness. Thus, while the Honyaki requires skilled hands, it rewards the individual who treats its blade with respect. 
The Honyaki is an object of skill and accomplishment, beauty, quality, and history. A Honyaki knife, given as a gift, represents all of this and more. Top Chefs use a Honyaki to symbolize their level of achievement, and a Honyaki is given, or collected, because of its beauty, function, history, and cultural [email protected] (http://www.sakaijapaneseknives.com/en/sakai-japanese-knives/18-japan-knife-catagories)


 
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THE HONYAKI (本焼)

@The Honyaki is the knife that legends and myths are made of. This series of knives is a treasured part of Japanese Cultural heritage. The Honyaki is not intended for the casual chef. Traditionally, a Japanese Chef purchases a Honyaki knife after completing his or her apprenticeship. To celebrate this achievement, a silver ring may be placed between the buffalo bolster and the wooden mahogany handle. In Japanese tradition, it is considered very poor taste for a Chef to use the Honyaki before his or her apprenticeship is completed. 
The Honyaki is an object of admiration that represents a long history of Japanese pride and craftsmanship. Encoded in the steel are centuries of experimentation, and a commitment to perfection. The Honyaki is forged from a single piece of steel, using the traditional method of differential hardening and tempering. The Japanese have developed a method to insulate parts of the knife, so that the metal cools at different rates. There is no room for error, lest the blade be destroyed. Only blacksmiths of great skill can master this method. It is so specialized, Master Hide uses a different blacksmith for each type of steel. 
There exists a belief that Japanese knives are very hard to sharpen; only in this case, is it true. The edge of the Honyaki is so hard, it will break, chip, or crack if dropped or abused. While the blade is delicate, it is also true that the harder the edge, the longer it maintains its sharpness. Thus, while the Honyaki requires skilled hands, it rewards the individual who treats its blade with respect. 
The Honyaki is an object of skill and accomplishment, beauty, quality, and history. A Honyaki knife, given as a gift, represents all of this and more. Top Chefs use a Honyaki to symbolize their level of achievement, and a Honyaki is given, or collected, because of its beauty, function, history, and cultural [email protected] (http://www.sakaijapaneseknives.com/en/sakai-japanese-knives/18-japan-knife-catagories)
That is some of the most interesting information I have read this week. Man that is COOL! Quick question, what is a traditional Honyaki on the Rockwell hardness scale?

~Mason
 
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"Quick question, what is a traditional Honyaki on the Rockwell hardness scale?"

Honyaki - White Steel (白鋼 - Shirohagane) or Blue Steel (青鋼 - Aohagane) HRC  64-65.

Many pro-users prefer to own White steelblades because of its good characteristic "Ease of resharpening" (easier to make sharp edge in the sharpening process).


 
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I believe that most of the carbides do not grind (not destroyed) because of their superhardness (70-80 HRC) - they are pulled out of a steel matrix with all its consequences.

"SLD steel by Hitachi is an excellent steel for kitchen knives. The base of the steel is SKD11 in JIS ( = Japanese Industrial Standard ) mainly used for dies fit for punching or stamping. The main features of the steel is hard, tough and strong against wearing. Hitachi has improved it for better work and longer life, and named it SLD. The main chemical compositions of it is : C 1.4-1.6%, Cr 11.0-13.0%, Mo 0.8-1.2% & V 0.2-0.50%. Generally the steels which contain Cr 13.0% or more are called stainless steel. SLD has close to 13.% Cr and are fairly resistant for rust. Due to high carbon like 1.5%, the HRC after heat-treating reaches about 60point. I have not checked the real HRC of this SLD but due to forging, can expect 1-2 or 3point higher. Furthermore, by combined with Cr, carbon makes and forms what it is called the primary carbide with HV ( = Vickers ) 1,800-2,000 hardness, equivalent to HRc 62-63.
If you have a chance to see the micto-structure, you will see many white tiny grains spread. The primary carbides are actually much higher in HRC (about 80 HRC) so this adds to excellent wear resistance of the steel. If you look at the photo below you can see the carbides mixed into the steel. So even though the whole hardness is HRC 60 for instance, while actually used or sharpened, I think that you will feel and experience the difference.
For users who want AS-like cutting performance with excellent wear resistance against rust at a reasonable price, this SLD steel would be an excellent choice.
(http://www.chefknivestogo.com/sldsteel.html)"


http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/bevels.html#intro

 
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Many manufacturers of expensive knives in Japan do not sharpen them. They believe that the cook independently optimizes the cutting edge of the knife under a certain kind of products (works). It does only manual and very expensive knife polishing - which shows the advantages and disadvantages of the internal structure of the steel. Microscopes have appeared recently, but you can really tell a lot about the quality of steel by polishing. There are other testing methods, but polished by centuries occupies a very important place (http://www.ksky.ne.jp/~sumie99/togi.html). The buyer in the first place on the polishing determines the quality of the steel knife.


Before the process of optimizing the cutting edge of the knife, it is important to understand the structure of plant and animal products:
[h2]Cell Biology/Introduction/Cell size[/h2]
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cell_Biology/Introduction/Cell_size

 
 
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