Knife Kits

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by jaywatson, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. jaywatson

    jaywatson

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    So, I just reduced the size of my knife kit, the one my school issued was more like a body bag to carry around! I love my Knife roll, but it doesn't fit EVERYTHING :(. Though I don't use everything in my classes now -- what are some essentials I should keep in there always besides my pairing knife, chef knife and steel?

    I know its personal preference, so I'm just curious on everyone's opinions!
     
  2. franzb69

    franzb69

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    boning, fillet, bread, spatula, whisk, spoon

    that's pretty much it aside from what you mentioned.
     
  3. jaywatson

    jaywatson

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    I absolutely love my boning knife though I'm looking for one a bit more flexible. Mine's a bit stiff, but it does its job.
     
  4. franzb69

    franzb69

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    oh i forgot, a thermometer.

    search on youtube how the japanese fillet their fish. you'll see a way to fillet fish with short fat one side sharpened knives.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    TIP to all students. Don't buy school knife sets > go to a rest. supply house  and assemble your own, or go on line... Less expensive and you have a choice and most cases much better quality.  The schools usually work on a 50 to 60 % markup..(also keep in mind what you buy is tax deductable
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2012
  6. jaywatson

    jaywatson

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    Oh wow I never thought of goin online and looking for the knifes. My school even gave me a list of things that were needed. I'm slowly collecting my own set on what feels comfortable.
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You can do just about all the knife stuff with a 10" chef's knife, a 10" or longer slicer, a bread/cake, and a 6" petty (a utility knife shaped like a couteau office petty or slicer, with a fine -- not serrated -- edge).  The petty takes the place of the paring and boning knife -- and every other short knife. 

    If you use a light, hard knife as your go-to chef's knife, you'll want something for heavy duty work.  There are a lot of very good, very inexpensive heavy duty knife choices; many of which are also useful for meat and fish work. 

    Unless you do a lot of garnish, such as hotel pans full of tourne, a paring knife is not a necessity.  But it's nice to have something small and sharp for opening packages, cutting trussing twine, and doing the other stuff that can wreck a good knife.  The disposable, serrated Forschners work well for that and you don't have to bother with sharpening or other maintenance for a knife born to abuse.

    If meat, fish, garnishing, or other specialty work is part of your stock in trade, you'll want whatever appropriate specialty knives and tools are needed for that. 

    You should carry at least one stone for emergencies, a steel (assuming your knives can be steeled), a bayonet style fork strong enough to lift a building, a slotted spoon or spider, a solid spatula and a fish spat.  

    You should know how to sharpen.  And by sharpen, I don't mean running your knife up and down an inappropriate steel, or using a tackle box carbide sharpener.  I mean actual sharpening.  You don't have to be a bench stone artist, but you should not have to rely on a "service" either. 

    You should also know how to steel; something very few people, especially pros, know how to do correctly.

    No matter what style of gyuto/chef's knife you prefer, it will be your most used knife and should be the the best quality you can reasonably afford.  What do I mean by quality?  Comfortable of course, and something both good enough to take a very good edge, and be maintained with relatively simple maintenance.  Crap knives -- a group which almost certainly includes your school knives -- take crap edges and lose them quickly. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2012
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Some of these articles made me look into my  knife box which is a large  foam lined tuffy plastic tool box with a top tray that lifts out , The count  3 assorted  french , 2 boning stiff and soft, 2 long slicers, 1 serrated slicer 2 paring, 1 cleaver, 1 steel, 1 roast fork, 12 assorted decorating tools, 3 melon parissienne  scoops, 2 small ice cream scoops, 1 serrated fancy cutter, 1 apple corer press type, 1 tomato ,(croc), 1 ss. egg slicer, 4 disposable pastry bags and 4 assorted tubes. 5 pair rubber gloves, 2 thermometers  About 50 items I don't think a roll will work.
     
  9. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I always have a pastry bag and tubes. I've never bothered with wisk, tongs, spoons etc. Most kitchens have those items on hand and the less I have to carry the better. A thermometer for sure.

    Bread knife, Petty and gyuto are always in kit. I only carry a cleaver or slicer when I know I'll need it. The vast majority of the time a small knife roll is plenty. Beyond that I carry a small plastic lockable tool box that I picked up from HD although I've been lusting after a Glestain for a few years now.

    I had a stiff and flexible boning knife for years but I really prefer the stiff. You'll probably end up with both but there's no need to always carry two.

    I find a breaking knife or cimetar an invaluable tool in my larger kit.

    As far as taxes go your unreimbursed work expenses (tools, uniforms etc) are only tax deductible if your total deductions exceed your standard deduction. Very unlikely for most students so don't over spend more expecting a bump in your tax return. ;)

    Dave
     
  10. chris42772

    chris42772

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    Caldarella's restaurant supply is giving away a free 8 inch chef knife to those of us that post about their manual can opener. I am writing to let you know that i have never used one, but would be happy to if i had one.
     
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    use a stiff boning knife for heavy cuts and hindquarters ,forequarters etc. I use a flex boning knife for chicken and some fish. Since a lot of off premise catering gigs you never know what you will find till you get there, hence I carry a lot. Each persons needs are different. I never know or ask what tax bracket a persaon is in I just tell them what can be deducted, they can ask their accountant if this fits their needs.