Knife ID?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by riddle, Feb 22, 2015.

  1. riddle

    riddle

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    After clearing out a family members house i came across this kitchen knife..

    I know it's not in the best of shape. (looks like i has taken a bit of abuse)
    But I did get curious.

    So I hope someone can shed some light on the origin and maker.

    Thanx in advance..

    Dennis.

    Thx in advance.

     
  2. galley swiller

    galley swiller

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    Since I can't read Chinese or Japanese (the two cultures actually use the same characters when writing), I can't say who made it, or any of the nuances about the particular knife.

    However, from the lower two pictures, it looks like the type of knife generally referred to as a Yanagiba.  It appears to my eye to have a single bevel edge, and I would guess about a 210 or 240 mm length 

    It's normally used for fine filleting of a fish, generally in one stroke.

    Lots of different makers, in all levels of quality.

    Galley Swiller
     
  3. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    I don't know what it is but I'd be really glad if I found it. Don't get rid of it, even if you find out it's not a "great" knife. A little sharpening perhaps.

    In researching I'd start looking at asian knife makers marks. I"m sure there' a web page for that and you can compare symbols. 
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    +1 on what Galley Swiller stated.  It appears to be a sashimi bocho, or sushi/sashimi knife requiring the use of a japanese waterstone for sharpening.
     
  5. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    First thing, get some 'Barkeepers friend' or 'Flitz' and get that rust off ASAP.  Rust grows out of control.  If it gets deep enough and pits, then the knife will have problems later.  Sharpen up high enough and you'll see a big hole where the rust ate through.
     
  6. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Barkeepers friend works fast because of the acid in it and while good on stainless I find it to cause yellowing spots later on carbon steel if you just wash and dry.

    You have to wash, scrub with baking soda paste, and wash again.

    I've seen this time and again restoring old carbon steel blades.

    I use Bon Ami and reserve BKF for specific needs.

    For the OP that knife needs to be done a  certain way so either send it someone familiar with Japanese knives or if you have waterstones watch the videos Jon Broida of Japanese Knife Imports made regarding single bevel knives before hitting a stone.

    I don't see any signs of abuse shy of the rusting which looks mile to moderate and any pitting may be small.

    If the blade surface feels like sandpaper you have major rust and will have bad pitting.

    The handle looks remarkably clean so perhaps this spent years in storage and not used much.

    It is a great find and a comparable knife is going to be $100+

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Looking at the rough factory grind marks around the congi/mark I'd say it is likely not an overly expensive blade, but probably quite decent, certainly likely around $100 replacement value.  Get it sharpened by someone experienced in fine Japanese cutlery and you'll also likely find it the sharpest knife you ever handled.  These yanajiba are not made for rough work, mostly for fine slicing of fish and other raw and boneless meat.  This is also a right-hander.

    Rick