Knife for cutting sushi rolls

34
14
Joined Feb 26, 2017
I have a few decent knives and there sharp we are now making sushi once or twice a week. For the life of me I can’t cut through a roll of sushi with what I’d call a precision cut. Watering my blade helps I’ve tried wrapping them in p it helps but I think I should be able to do better and I put a pretty good edge on a knife there ground at 15 degrees and most are finished at 600 to 800 grit if that matters should I try a different angle or possibly a courser or smoother stone it’s also a flat hand grind not a beveled edge from a belt I have an edge pro system maybe that’s an issue here but I can produce a very good edge. I generally stop at 600 to 800 grit because I tend think my edge lasts longer I do hone my edge regularly. I don’t think it’s the actual knife. Maybe I need a finer finish?

dont get me wrong my rolls look decent but some of the videos I’ve watched piss me off because there blades flat glide through the roll. I’m not extremely experienced you won’t think wow look at him chop but I can handle a blade. Maybe I just need a thousand hours cutting?
 
2,608
479
Joined Jan 4, 2011
It shouldn't really be all that big a deal. Your knife needs to be sharp enough; your basic regular razor sharpness. You have to have a combination of both the length of blade and the strength to cut through in one(1) slice without smashing the guts out of the roll. It's a one(1) slice deal. You can certainly do it with a very sharp carving knife as long as NO Japanese guys are watching.
 
509
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Joined May 29, 2013
I would probably polish the edge of whatever blade I would be using to at least 5000 grit, if not higher. 600 to 800 grit is really a tad coarse for a single clean slice.

I"m glad to hear you have an Edge Pro. Using that is much, MUCH better than using anything motorized, such as a belt grinder. Those "quick" motorized grinding sharpeners raise an awful lotta sparks - and each of those sparks represents an increase in the temperature at the immediate edge. That increase in temperature, right where the metal is thinnest, means that the edge runs a very high risk of losing its temper.

If I were choosing a particular blade to make the slice, I would consider what professional sushi chefs would use: a sujihiki for casual use (lunchtime) or a yanagiba for more formal presentations (dinnertime). The length should not be any shorter than 270mm and you want a thin blade.

GS
 
34
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Joined Feb 26, 2017
Thanks I wondered if I needed a finer grit. Theres a number of us using the main knives in my kitchen and a couple of them are hard on edges so I’ve kind of stuck with a 600 To 800 grit it holds up well and I can refresh them all in a few minutes v the time it takes to really put a fine edge on one. I will put a better edge on one knife and see if that helps and if so I will reserve a knife for things like that.
 
509
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Joined May 29, 2013
"Theres a number of us using the main knives in my kitchen and a couple of them are hard on edges..."

Hmmmm....

My reaction is that, unless you can keep the problem players away from any polished edge knives, much of your efforts may be in vain.

Normally, I'm thinking that each cook/chef is responsible for his/her own blades - and will appropriately guard them from all other hands in the kitchen, and then for for those who simply can't get their own knives, the kitchen provides house knives, but it's sounding like part of your problem is multiple cooks/chefs using the same blades (nothing but house knives) - and then expecting that the edges will remain sharp.

GS
 
34
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Joined Feb 26, 2017
Well its life here on the homefront one of my boys is just clunky hes a super genius but missed the fluid motion and physical balance traits a lot of us take for granite you know the kid thats so smart but cant dress himself thats one of them however hes learning to cook more and more great meals which is huge and he likes showing off what hes learned he and I are the ones making a go at sushi and we have come a long ways. So I live with watching my knives be abused. Funny the one hats the hardest on them is often my wife and I’m quick to point that out when shes abusing my favorite knife. I think everyone leaves it alone any more.
 
2,608
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Joined Jan 4, 2011
Neither of the two(2) knives I suggested are "speciality knives". Both are very usable additions to a knife roll.
 
1
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Joined Apr 25, 2020
No special knife is needed to cut rolls, expectly inside out rolls (rice outside). What i have found to work best as millionknives mentioned a not so tall knife, length does matter, rather the technique to cutting rolls. First you line up your cut, do a little saw through to cut through the nori, and push down. This will work on both rolls with topping (clear wrap on top) and no topping. If your asking for nori on the outside it a harder roll to cut. Same sawing motion to make the initial cut on the nori, and then you make a quick trusting type cut toward your cutting board, this is be able make a clean cut on the bottom nori. Normally rolls with nori on the outside are serve ASAP to preserve the crispy nature of the nori. Hope this helps. I sharpen my knives to a 2000 grit, but 800 to 1000 should be enough, if it can cut through newspaper cleanly it will be fine. ALWAYS wet your knife before cuts, and wipe your knife in-between rolls.
 
12
7
Joined Aug 19, 2019
I have a few decent knives and there sharp we are now making sushi once or twice a week. For the life of me I can’t cut through a roll of sushi with what I’d call a precision cut. Watering my blade helps I’ve tried wrapping them in p it helps but I think I should be able to do better and I put a pretty good edge on a knife there ground at 15 degrees and most are finished at 600 to 800 grit if that matters should I try a different angle or possibly a courser or smoother stone it’s also a flat hand grind not a beveled edge from a belt I have an edge pro system maybe that’s an issue here but I can produce a very good edge. I generally stop at 600 to 800 grit because I tend think my edge lasts longer I do hone my edge regularly. I don’t think it’s the actual knife. Maybe I need a finer finish?

dont get me wrong my rolls look decent but some of the videos I’ve watched piss me off because there blades flat glide through the roll. I’m not extremely experienced you won’t think wow look at him chop but I can handle a blade. Maybe I just need a thousand hours cutting?
Try a Victorianox slicer. That works the best for me. Thin blade, but have to keep razor sharp.
 
34
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Joined Feb 26, 2017
Something that had not occurred to me was my fillet knife which is a 14” hollow ground blade. It Lives in the garage untouched by anyone but me. I was able to produce much better cuts with this knife it’s edge is what I’d classify as sharp i Will put a much finer edge on a couple of my kitchen knives soon and see if that helps. I do wonder if a thinner shorter blade profile produces less drag for beginners. I know some of the videos are using normal chefs knives. We make enough sushi with the coronavirus shut down that I’m sure we will find something that works better.
 

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