Kitchen Terminology & Slang

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by cookingboi, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. cookingboi

    cookingboi

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    Hi everyone.  My name's Chris and I'm brand new to this site so I just wanted to say hi to everyone.

    I have checked out the site briefly but I couldn't exactly find what I was looking for. I am trying to move up into a line cook position and I'm looking for terms and slang used in the kitchen.  I already know the "in the weeds" means "I'm backed up and need some help," and "on the fly" means "drop what you're doing and do this."

    I'd like to know the rest of them so that if I do get a job as a line cook, I'll have a good grasp ahead of time.  Thanks to all of you for your help.

    ~Chris
     
  2. arugula

    arugula

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    " 86 the ____, Chef." - You do not have anymore ____ in the building." (Example carrots, ribs, oranges, ect.)

    Mind your back. - moving behind someone on the line.

    Fire table ____! - put table ___ in the window...
     
  3. guts

    guts

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    I wouldn't worry, this is stuff you'll pick up along the way - and there are much more important things you should probably be concentrating on.
     
  4. just jim

    just jim

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  5. smork

    smork

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    only term you need to know is "yes chef"   "right away chef"     .
     
  6. veronporter

    veronporter

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    Not trying to rip your post apart but I think in most kitchens you simply say "behind" or "atrás" when walking behind someone and "fire" means to start cooking the table where as "sell" means to put it in the window.
     
  7. veronporter

    veronporter

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    Most of these aren't universal but some stuff I've picked up over the years;

    "range" or "piano" - oven-top burners.

    "robocop" - robot-coup/food-processor. ex. "Hey, where the hell is robocop?"

    "blitz it" - puree in vitamix.

    "morons" - waiter. ex. "tell the morons to stab their goddamn tickets!"

    "heard it" - I understand and will now act accordingly. ex. Chef; "sell table 6 then get me garniture ready for table 11" you; "Heard it!"

    "joto" - pronounced ho-toe; a term of affection and/or endearment, especially for a hispanic coworker. ex; "you're such a filthy joto"

    "flash" - briefly heating a plate of food in the salamander/oven to assure it's piping-hot for the guest. ex. "flash and sell baby"

    "chef de partie" - french for "line-cook".

    "sally" - salamander oven/broiler. ex. "pop that plate in the sally and GO!"
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  8. shootoo

    shootoo

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    Don't mean to... Question your kitchen's slang... But if a new guy called one of my hispanic cooks a joto, they'd more likely than not get their ass beat
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  9. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Touch-it-up == hit it with the Brulee torch.

    Zap it == Same thing, also microwave briefly.

    "Hang on I'm in the zone" == Don't bug me about that right now, I'm totally

         focused on everything I'm doing.

    Dunk-it== quick blanch
     
  10. veronporter

    veronporter

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    Yeah, that one flew right over your head... See, in my kitchen we call that a "joke".
     
  11. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I don't know who told you the definition of this word, it is far from a term of affection. I'd like to see you walk up to any Hispanic person and call them a filthy Joto, you would probably end up on the floor. You better brush up on your Spanish.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
  12. just jim

    just jim

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    Depending on the environment, any derogetory term can be a term of affection.

    I wouldn't walk up to a stranger and say that, but would have no porblem with a close coworker.

    Similar to how my friends and I greet eat other with the bird, call each other foul names, etc.
     
  13. rdm magic

    rdm magic

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    You never call your friends misc. insults that can't be said here, as a term of endearment?
     
  14. veronporter

    veronporter

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    Thanks for getting it...
     
     
  15. shootoo

    shootoo

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    I get it... I'm sure we all do it to some form or another. I think it was a little weird how you left it in the list that you had there though.
     
  16. wyoming fsd

    wyoming fsd

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    There's the basics, a "10 top just came in", 10 people... "salads out on 5" salads taken to table 5, so food better be ready in 5-10 minutes depending on the turnover and normal ticket times.

    "All day" as in I have 4 steaks hanging all day (right now)... "I'm dragging a ___" I'm behind or slow to cook an item, (don't be that guy). I'm sure you will catch on fast, best of luck!
     
     
  17. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    I have noticed the language varies by state and or location.
     
  18. sibs

    sibs

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    Umm...a chef de partie is actually someone who's in charge of a section (as in Chef de Partie Garde Manger).

    Sarah
     
  19. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    AKA line cook.
     
  20. sibs

    sibs

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    Isn't a line cook just a cook who works on the line?