King #1000-#6000 combo stone

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by ordo, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. ordo

    ordo

    Messages:
    2,464
    Likes Received:
    251
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    A friend of mine bought this stone, in spite of all my warnings against it.

    I will be trying it with some knives, just for the fun of it.

     
  2. mike9

    mike9

    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    338
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    I'd check with the vendor - the 1k side may need soaking, but the 6k might be splash and go.  I have a King 6k as my finish stone and they are quite good.  He may want to get an Atoma coarse diamond to flatten them with.
     
  3. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Ordo dont be so dogmatic! Mike these are fine we store them for months on end in water at work.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015
  4. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,271
    Likes Received:
    205
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    @ordo; it will be interesting to hear your opinion on this very popular King stone and even more relative to the stones you normally use. One can't get enough valuable first-hand experience.

    I too own a 1000/6000 King, maybe the larger size. Mine doesn't have that black plastic thing in the middle which does appear also in another smaller King I have, also a combo, a 800/200.

    I use this diamond "flattener"... from the DIY store. They sell those as knife-sharpeners and they come in a package of 3 different "grits". Cheap and incredibly fast thing! I had to glue the metal back on to the hard plastic carrier, using waterproof glue paste. I would never use those diamond things on knives but as a stone flattener they are simply superb!

    This is an older picture I took way back. The 2nd part of the combo is not visible in this picture.

     
  5. ordo

    ordo

    Messages:
    2,464
    Likes Received:
    251
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Great to hear you have that very same stone Chris.

    Remember i'm comparing this combo King with Bester #1200, Glass Stone #1000, Naniwa Chocera #1000 and Naniwa Chocera #5000. Not really a fair comparison, if we think in terms of prices. I mean the King combo costs $38, and for instance the Naniwa #5000 alone costs about $120.

    The King #1000 is a very nice stone. Loved it. Pretty agressive, you can feel it's eating steel even by the sound. It could be the only stone somebody needs in a kitchen. i didn't feel the need of long time soaking at all, just a couple of minutes. Have to say that grits are not comparable at all. The Naniwa #1000 for instance gives a totally different finishing. This one feels like a #800 or so.

    The #6000, i confess i didn't like it. Its super soft, not even comparable with the Naniwa #5000, it wears a lot and the finishing is rough in comparison. I mean, the Naniwa gives almost a polished edge, it's much harder, a durable, precious stone. No suprises here.

    In conclusion, if i were again in the position to advice some friend or a newbie, i would encourage to buy the King #1000. There's a thick version that goes for about $24, which is great value.

    The combo King comes with a small Nagura, which i didn't use cause i have the bigger and excellent Nagura that came with the Naniwas.

    Sharpening again put me in the mood and i sharpened my daily knives following the usual progression #1000-#5000 and strop, which gives me the best edges i can get. I was inspired and got beautiful super scary edges, the best of all from the Honsho-Kanemasa gyuto, a knife that gave me some smell troubles when I bought (SK-4 steel) it but today is totally stabilized with an old patina. No other knives I have cut like this one. 
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015