Kilts in the kitchen?

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Joined Oct 10, 2005
O.k. Just for arguments sake.

You have a kilt, which if I understand correctly is made of heavy-ish material. Then you have knee high socks, which are knitted, maybe not wool, but definitely keeping your legs nice and toasty.

So on a hot summers night behind the line, what comfort advantages does a kilt and knee high socks have over a light weight fabric pair of pants and ankle length socks?
 
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P.s., thanks for the link, got a blast out of that--a spoon shoved down your sock "for emergencies". Then again Ramsey IS Scots, born in Glasgow.

But bagpipe music in the kitchen IS NOT up for discussion.....
 
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P.s., thanks for the link, got a blast out of that--a spoon shoved down your sock "for emergencies". Then again Ramsey IS Scots, born in Glasgow.

But bagpipe music in the kitchen IS NOT up for discussion.....
 
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The FDA Code does not specify attire that I am aware of. So no infractions there. Local codes may be different.
 
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I had planned to look at a lot of men wearing kilts today, but I wasn't able to make it to the parade. Many kilts are pleated and would therefore be subject to billowing. They would seem hazardous in terms of getting caught in and on things.
 
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One endeavors to expose less skin in a kitchen rather than more and hopefully for obvious reasons. Kilts in the kitchen is an idea absurd on its face. The inevitable very bad 2nd if not 3rd degree burns will convince management that it was a bad idea. Maybe it would work in an ice cream shop.
 
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One endeavors to expose less skin in a kitchen rather than more and hopefully for obvious reasons. Kilts in the kitchen is an idea absurd on its face. The inevitable very bad 2nd if not 3rd degree burns will convince management that it was a bad idea. Maybe it would work in an ice cream shop.

Explain to me in what situation you would get 2nd or 3rd degree burns wearing a kilt that you wouldn't get by wearing a normal pair of pants.
 
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Explain to me in what situation you would get 2nd or 3rd degree burns wearing a kilt that you wouldn't get by wearing a normal pair of pants.

Chefs' attire is loose (but not overly so) for a reason. Now you know why. Any close-fitting apparel like jeans, tight fitting shirts, etc. or none at all (shorts, kilts, or whatever exposes bare skin) will result in the worst burns, especially hot grease splatters and the like. It holds the hot grease or whatever right next to your skin.

This is basic shit that everybody ought to know.

One of about a kajillion references on the subject:

Why are Chef Pants Baggy?
Chef pants are baggy to help keep chefs cool in the kitchen, which can be an extremely hot environment. As well, the loose pants give cooks room to move around with ease, bend over, etc. Chef's pants often have large pockets in them to accommodate kitchen tools or hand towels. Loose fitting pants also help protect from burns.

Today, you can purchase houndstooth or black and white checked chef pants from a number of manufacturers. Pants can also be bought in many solid colors, striped patterns, abstract, food or kitchen-ware patterns.

Lightweight cotton or mixed synthetics are used, sometimes with a Teflon coating, to resist stains and protect from burns. Tight fitting pants, would be very dangerous in the case of a hot oil spill, as the fabric would hold the heat right against the skin. Loose fitting trousers help keep the hot oil from contacting the skin. At the same time, an overly baggy style is sometimes worn by chefs in the U.S. and this can present its own safety hazard. If the material is too loose, it might catch on kitchen equipment, or even catch on fire.
 
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Chefs' attire is loose for a reason. Now you know why. Any close-fitting apparel like jeans, tight fitting shirts, etc. or none at all (shorts, kilts, or whatever exposes bare skin) will result in the worst burns, especially hot grease splatters and the like.

This is basic shit that everybody ought to know.

Again, explain to me a situation that you would get 2nd or 3rd degree burns wearing a kilt that you wouldn't get by wearing pants. Grease "splatters" don't result in 2nd or 3rd degree burns.
 
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I’m an American Chef and a professional. I believe that kitchens should be operated in a professional manner, this includes staff wearing proper attire. Makes no difference what your hobbies might be. Even women wear pants in the kitchen, much of this has to do with kitchen safety.
Besides why would anyone want to wear a kilt in the kitchen?
 
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I’m an American Chef and a professional. I believe that kitchens should be operated in a professional manner

I'm pretty sure we all think that, don't we? I don't personally think that a uniform choice dictates how professional or not a kitchen is.

Even women wear pants in the kitchen

Unreal, right? Women do all sorts of crazy things now-a-days.

much of this has to do with kitchen safety.
Besides why would anyone want to wear a kilt in the kitchen?

Again, I'd ask what safety issues you imagine would happen with kilts that wouldn't happen with pants. What is someone more likely to do or have done to them wearing a kilt?
 
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HI Someday,
,
Well, yah, you make a good point. However, a few posts ago, March 10, I asked if there was an "edge" or any bonus into wearing a heavy material kilt and heavy knitted knee high socks in a hot, chaotic kitchen on a muggy August afternoon.

Is there?
 
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HI Someday,
,
Well, yah, you make a good point. However, a few posts ago, March 10, I asked if there was an "edge" or any bonus into wearing a heavy material kilt and heavy knitted knee high socks in a hot, chaotic kitchen on a muggy August afternoon.

Is there?

I don't think, nor have I ever said, that there are advantages to wearing a kilt. I'm only saying that the potential negatives in wearing a kilt aren't as bad as a lot of people seem to think or are arguing about.

I'm arguing against the idea that it is MORE dangerous (again, it might be, but I would argue only marginally), not arguing that it is in any way beneficial.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Fair enough...

Actually, I' m a bit jealous of your way of thinking, in some ways it's a luxury I never had.

There's a difference between the American expression of " the squeaky wheel gets the oil" and the Japanese expression ( loosely translated) of " the nail that sticks out gets pounded".

Growing up in the praries, my life was governed by the Japanese expression. Bring an umbrella to school, you get the ( deleted) beat out if you, wear red, same thing, if you didn't wear Levi's--or God forbid, you wore Wranglers or Lee jeans, same thing. High school was even worse, and compounded if you didn't belong to ( preferably) a) the jocks, b) the stoners, the c) drama geeks, or d) the egg heads.

Getting my first job as a dishwasher at 16 was an escape from this crap. You simply went to housekeeping and got a uniform, same as everyone else. You were judged by your peers on your performance and output, not clothing, and this is one of the main reasons why I continue to work in kitchens for over 35 years now.

Matter of fact most jobs in my life so far the employers provided a uniform and you never thought twice about wearing something different. And it's because of this I just can't wrap my head around wearing something different in the kitchen.
 
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Asian cultures generally celebrate interdependence and conformity and tend to ignore the exceptional/outliers. They find their role in society and look at their respective role as it fits into the larger ideas of country, family, etc.

Western cultures generally celebrate individual achievement above anything else and recognize the self identity of the individual above most other things. Independent thought, not being a "sheep," etc are all valued above most other forms of identity.

Your point is a bit lost on me though, since the OP was stating that kilts were the uniform in the kitchen he worked at. It sounds like the OP friend's kitchen is providing them with the uniform that they all wear...so in that kitchen, if you wore something other than a kilt, you'd be the one wearing something "different"
 
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