Kilts in the kitchen?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by macstrat, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. Chrisopotamus

    Chrisopotamus

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    I can't imagine someone wearing pantyhose in the kitchen. Synthetic fabrics (plastics, etc.) actually melt into your skin if there's a fire or extreme heat. I'll never forget this happening to an older lady in my neighborhood. She reached into the cabinet over her gas stove while a kettle was on to boil and the front of her nightgown melted into her chest. She had to have skin graphs for like 2 years. It was horrible.
     
  2. harrisonh

    harrisonh

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    Seems we have a few millenials trying to make an excuse for an affectation and pretend it's mainstreamed somewhere when we all know it's not.

    Kilts have a purpose. That purpose doesn't exist in a kitchen.
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    “Millennial “... are you using that term descriptively or in a demeaning manner? How do you know who here is a millennial or not?
     
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  4. hookedcook

    hookedcook Banned

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    Its a kilt! What's the big deal. Do you fear all the guys in skirts are going to rub their balls in the customers food?
     
  5. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    No, but personally I would offer that any type of open bottom garment
    (kilt, dress, skirt, nightgown) worn without an undergarment would be
    kind of unsanitary. But that's me.
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I dare say that poor handwashing is much more unsanitary than kilt wearing.
     
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  7. someday

    someday

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    Lol, oh god this thread again.

    That's quite an assumption. I don't think anyone made the argument it was mainstream, just that it's honestly not that big a deal. And I didn't see anyone making excuses, just that it's a personal fashion/clothing choice (that I personally wouldn't make) that most likely wouldn't affect anything meaningful in the day to day work in a kitchen.
     
  8. someday

    someday

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    Whoops, double post.
     
  9. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I have no problem with guys in kilts, but not in my kitchen. Now before you get your knickers in even more of a bunch, I wouldn't let female cooks wear skirts either. It's a safety issue, as far as I'm concerned. Everyone should be in pants to protect your legs. Stuff splatters, stuff spills. It's about appropriate clothing at the appropriate times. BTW, I do not allow shorts in my kitchens either.
     
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  10. hookedcook

    hookedcook Banned

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    Hi pete, I get what your saying but I might have to bend the rules with a girl in a skirt. If she gets burned then she can join the club
     
  11. r.shackleford

    r.shackleford

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    Besides all the money you could save on Gold Bond think about how practical a sporran would be, you can store your tongs, knives, seasonings, oil, cigarettes, so many options
     
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  12. macstrat

    macstrat

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    Thats not a bad idea...The dishwasher-safe sporran
     
  13. SnikleChickChef

    SnikleChickChef

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    I personally love working in a skirt, so much airflow! Knee length, not flowy, just a good utilitarian skirt. Though most of the kitchens I've been in also allow shorts, maybe due to hot weather? Idk But it's definitely not something to get in a twist over.
     
  14. kognqk

    kognqk

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    Centerpiece in the modern kitchen this days are around food -safety initiatives. To identify and PRIORITIZE and control potential problems including chemical , microbial , physical damages , must be for every restaurant , hotel etc.
    Food /Safety , Health /Safety law are imperative about improper care , cleaning , uniforms , handling , stop hairs , fibres , contents of pockets getting into the food . All that are Dress code policy .
    One of the requirements are uniform to be long sleeved , pants, light colored/ to show the dirt / and prevents skin from touching food .
    Next few word are only for curious mind , or for people who care for real what they do in the kitchen.
    Fecal bacteria founded in the KITCHEN , kitchen sink drain are more than will be found in the toilet.
    wearing Kilts does not fit at any professional kitchen .
    but professionalism is as much as people who practice are professionals
     
  15. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't allow shorts either. Again it is a safety issue....and a business decision. If you spill something, and it will happen, it can very easily splash up on your legs. Now if this is hot soup, hot grease, etc. if your legs are exposed they are going to suffer much more greatly is bare, or in the case of a longer skirt, has the ability to splash up underneath, than if you are protected, by cloth on your legs. By requiring pants, on all kitchen staff, I am not only helping to ensure their safety, but I am looking out for the financial well being of my business also. Any injury one of my staff sustains, is going to cost me money, so it is my financial responsibility to, not only try to lessen the number of accidents, but also try to impact of those accidents that do happen. As someone that was involved in a kitchen accident where I had a number of gallons of boiling water poured onto my leg, and seeing the damage done, when I was wearing pants, I can't imagine the damage had that water poured directly onto my skin. So, while I don't get "in a twist over" it, I certainly don't allow exposed legs in my kitchen.
     
  16. someday

    someday

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    In your scenario of having a number of gallons of boiling water poured on your leg (sorry, that really sucks BTW), what protection do you think a few MM of cloth provided you?

    If there is a bucket of fryer oil on the ground, and somehow I step directly into it, it won't matter if I'm wearing shoes/socks or not. In fact, in that scenario, the shoes/socks might be less of a benefit because it would allow the oil to "stick" to my foot even longer.

    Also, my understanding is kilts go down past the knee, and you wear heavy knee length socks with them. So the area of exposed skin is limited.

    Anyways...I'll say again. I'm not really personally in favor of kilts in the kitchen, but I don't think there are massive safety issues like the rest of you seem to think.

    Fecal matter? Get outta here...kilts are no less sanitary than other forms of clothing.
     
  17. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I just don't get it with the kilt thing....

    Look, every kitchen I've worked in, either the employer provided uniforms, or, in Europe, the employer had a dress code you adhered to--which was pretty much the same thing, cooks jacket and pants. In any case you wore that uniform or were subject to discipline. No, you can't wear your favorite ball cap, a sweat rag, a "party till ya puke" t shirt, high heels, or long uncovered unmanageable hair.

    The whole idea of a uniform is that--uniform. everyone might dress the same, but you are identified by the quality of your work, not your clothing choices.

    The cooks uniform--contrary to what many clothing designers believe-- has developed out of neccesity, common sense, and protecting as much surface area of your skin as possible.

    So I wonder, what do cooks wear in say, Glasgow, or the Shetland islands? Pretty sure it's a standard cooks jacket and pants.
     
  18. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not thick, but it still offers some protection. In my case, it probably didn't offer much, as the amount of water was significant, although I still feel that without pants, that water hitting my bare leg would have done a lot more damage, but in more regular scenarios where a cook might drop a sauté pan with oil in it or a smaller sauce pot with a quart or less of sauce, those pants will protect, not only as the stuff falls but after it hits the ground and the liquid bounces back up. I agree, that if a kilt is properly worn, with the proper length socks, it does limit the amount of exposed skin, but when I was in the punk scene, and lots of guys were wearing kilts they were wearing them with combat boots and socks that just barely come above said boots. As a chef, I don't want to have to do "sock" patrol also. As for your shoes and sock comment, we can always come up with scenarios where protective equipment and clothing can cause more damage (the "what if my car stalls on the train tracks and I can't get my seatbelt unfastened in time" argument) but those are the exception, not the rule. And in my instance, I would have been better off in open toed shoes as my shoes filled with water and kept burning until I could get them off. Luckily, for me, I got my shoes and socks off, before skin cooked enough to come off with them.

    I agree, that they are necessarily a "massive" safety issue, but I do feel that they are less safe than pants, and I am not willing to allow my cooks to put themselves in a situation they will regret, nor am I willing to pay higher medical bills, because my cooks want to wear something that I believe is less safe. And, yes, I know it somewhat hypocritical of me as I don't require my cooks to wear cut gloves.
     
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  19. kognqk

    kognqk

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    cooking is enjoyable, depending on whoever practices , but before that must be safe . There is nothing more important than your own health .
    a lot of people this days are involved in to this wonderful craft because of wrong reasons , attributed to TV shows, shiny cooking , fancy knifes etc. gives impression how wonderful kitchen life is . Today we will use this and that and we will make a fusion today ,inspired by another shiny idiot from another absurd tv show.
    Кitchen is a dangerous and hostile place .
    Chefs, like many professionals, wear their uniforms practically every day ,to be PROTECTED from every day kitchen dangers. Hot spills , splatters , burns …etc….Specific design apply for / talk about real uniforms . No cheapest junk that companies buy just to tick the boxes Work Done/
    Chef uniform are barrier can potentially offer some protection starting from temperature differences ,thermal hazards to unpredictable one .Multiple layered fabrics with increased insulation , water impermeable barrier , pants , comes up to increase the level protection.
    Тoday there are wonderful fabrics, light, comfortable , for all-day comfort and Real protection.
    Cooking is not a game , work in the kitchen are not that safe as many people think .
    I still remember 20 years ago, how 40l of hot glucose took off the skin of a young woman 27y who decided to work on a short sleeve and shorts / because kitchen are hot place /. lawyers, courts for about 2 years …………………..nightmares . another question is that , she become cripple.
    the problem is not in to wearing a kilt.
    the problem is in the one , the person who allows it that to happen
     
  20. someday

    someday

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    Nobody has described a scenario in which a kilt, with the possible exception of some minor splatter burns to the legs, is more dangerous than any other form of lower body covering. In the scenarios which are described above the results would be the same, i.e. someone spills boiling water or scalding oil on a leg. Apart from some industrial style protection, there isn't anything practical in the kitchen that would help against that. You're f-d either way.

    I also remembered this little clip from the wonderful (and far superior to the American version) Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares...