Keeping my hands clean

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by grasshoppa, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. grasshoppa

    grasshoppa

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    So I just got my first job in a fine dining joint and I'm cooking on a fireplace. four foot flames, at face level, that probably get 400 plus degrees (judging their temp by the fact that the outer portion of my right arm no longer has any hair on it, due to the fact that its my 'reaching' arm). Anyway, every time I come home, my hands are black. I look like a damn chimney sweep. And its not just soot or ash, its looks and smells like some food remnants that have been cooked on to me. I try to use a clean hand towel during service, and I wash my hands as much as possible (although there is no sink on my station), but still my hands are terrible. I thought about wearing gloves, but I think the extreme heat would melt them. When I come home, I scrub for fifteen+ minutes with soap, water, nail brush etc but there are still stubborn parts that won't come out (along my nail line, in my fingerprint grooves) no matter how long I spend. I thought about using rubbing alcohol, but won't that just dry and weaken my skin, making me further susceptible to the various burns and blisters I have collected from this fireplace? Any suggestions?
     
  2. thetincook

    thetincook

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    They make mechanic's soap (Lava) that should do the trick.

    You could also try using a paste of oil or vasoline, and sugar or salt. The oils will soften the soot deposits if you let it sit in for a few, and the salt is an abrasive that's gentler on skin then the pumice used in mechanic's soap.

    Get some good lotion. You'll need it.
     
  3. patrick spriggs

    patrick spriggs

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    yeah that "lava soup" should work well. (its called something else where im from but i cant remember)

    You may also have to use some sort of mouisturizer if you plan on washing them often with that.
     
  4. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Before you start your shift apply a decent amount of a "silicone barrier cream" it will help in preventing the soot from working it's way in. 

    Wash often and reapply after each wash.   It's food safe and doesn't make your hands slippery once worked in.
     
  5. smork

    smork

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    keep some baby oil handy.   just a light coat a few times during the day between washing.   vaseline will get nasty after awhile and is just to thick to use efficiently.
     
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Silicone gloves.

    Like the 'que guys use.

    Look kinda clumsy but my brother swears by them.

    mimi
     
  7. hozz

    hozz

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    Drink coffée? Mix the leftover solids from your last brew with a bit of soap, and scrub. Works wonders.