k-bar knife?

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Joined Nov 13, 2016
I know this is not an chefs knife, but I have a K-Bar knife, its like a hunting-outdoor knife, I just can't get it to sharpen, I was thinking of thinning the blade down, would anyone have a knife like this, and if so, would you know what the problem is with this knife, would thinning help?
 
4,155
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
Which K-bar knife and for what application do you intend? My only experience is with the fighting knife and that won't benefit much by "thinning" if used for its intended purpose.

And what are you sharpening with? Ive always found hard steel hunting knives like my 440 steel Gerbers very difficult to sharpen without judicious use of coarse oilstones to set the edge or power tools.
 
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75
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Now I get the pic, I finally got the edge I wanted, I did thin the blade down, but at the cost of ruining my 400 grit whetstone, lol!  It ate a groove right in the middle, I mean a valley! I guess I can always get a real low coarse or sandpaper and try to get it even. well its just another learning phase.
 
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I always get hammered for making this suggestion, but even one of the very affordable Arkansas tri-hones may be better suited to that job than what you used. The coarsest stone on them is never a natural Ark but coarse and tough enough for hard steel like hunting knives. I use one, and a surgical black, for my cooking knives and get great edges. An "old fashioned" approach that many eschew today in lieu of waterstones. I hope your stone is salvageable.
 
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2,563
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
Dunno why you want a thin edge on an outdoor knife.  I would want a thicker more robust edge that takes abuse.  If it is hard to sharpen or doesn't take or keep an edge, it is due to heat treat and tempering of the steel which is not a thing you can fix.  
 
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Joined Nov 13, 2016
I really just wanted to get a sharp edge, and just to see what thinning would do to this knife, I really don't use it at all, so it was just something like an experiment, but thanks for all the info, Just got to see if I can save this stone, lol. 
 
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Get a flattening device. Draw a grid in pencil and start flattening. You'll see the high and low spots easily. Repeat as needed.
 
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Thanks for the advice, all I really got is a atoma 400, I don't think that will work, have find something else.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
If this is a waterstone they are very easy to flatten and an atoma 400 will work, all you have to do is soak it and hold under a faucet will you rub away.  Or save your atoma for better projects and rub it on the ruff side of a granite slab, keeping it wet, but drywall screen makes things go faster.  Actually a cement paver work real nice for course stone, but not recomended for your fine stones.  CKTG sell a decent 140K dimaond flattening plate fairly cheap, but check it out on your rough stone first as they tend to have high-spots that will gouge your fine stones a little too deep.

If this is an oil stone you can also use the paver, but they are tough to flatten and not worth the effort.  Some folks will just always use what they've always used and do what they've always done, but wisdom here says use your stone for a paper weight or just toss it and get yourself a 300K King waterstone, which will set you back all of $20 or so.
 
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Most of the King lineup is known for being rather soft and not as fast cutting as more expensive waterstones, but the 300 I understand is hard and resists dishing well, and works as good as any.
 
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The 400 grit stone is saved! I used drywall screens 80 and then some 120 grit, then the atoma 400, it pretty flat, except one side there is still a very small amount of light coming through, when I put a straight edge on top of the stone, I think another flattening with the atoma will get that.
 
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So that 400 is a waterstone, right?  Cause I don't think DS would manage an oilstone well.  But it seems this stone took some effort to flatten anyway.

In future, try using all parts of the stone, it stays pretty flat that way, and it is pretty easy to do for rough work. 
 
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