Juustoleipa Cheese

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kidaly, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. kidaly

    kidaly

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    I had a bit of Juustoleipa cheese (a few months ago) and I haven't been able to get it off my mind :) I want to try to pair it up with some fruit, maybe on some skewers with some fresh berries for a dessert? It was creamy with a hint of a buttery tinge to it and reminded my tastebuds of custard :) Or maybe it might be good wrapped in puff pastry with something sweet?

    Has anyone had any experience with this stuff? If so, have you tried sweet or savory goodies?

    I can't wait to get my hands on some more of it! :)

    Thanks for any help! I've only read that it's served with breakfast typically. I was really surprised that I hadn't heard of it before!

    :bounce: - Kidaly
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Looked it up in my 1976 World Atlas of Cheese -- it comes from central Finland; at that time, there was a factory in Sotkamo that made it (besides the small farmhouse producers). It does sound intriguing: "the surface . . . is grilled above an open fire, or in the oven, then set aside to ripen; in a few days it is ready to eat." Cow's milk, with a 40% fat content, mmmmmm :lips:

    My guess is that you'd have to find a purveyor that has specialty Scandinavian imports. Is there a town near you that has a lot of descendants of Finns? Or maybe even Marshall Field can get it; they carry food products, don't they?
     
  3. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Maybe Treasure Island? Come on, you Chicagolanders, help Kidaly out on this one.
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Should be able to get some here in Minnesota, I'll ask around.

    Kuan
     
  5. hexnymph

    hexnymph

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    The locals refer to it as squeeky cheese up here. We have a large Finish population up here.

    It's available in most supermarkets up here... I believe it's made locally. I've attempted to make it once. It's basically milk and renet. I say attempted because it didn't appear like the store bought stuff... but tasted just as good.

    The old Finn's put it in their coffee.

    Hex in da U.P.
     
  6. kidaly

    kidaly

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    Thanks for all the responses! Unfortunately, I can't yet imagine myself making cheese, but maybe someday (!?) I'll get up my nerve to try it :) Until then, I think I'll have to keep looking around here (Chicagoland) or take a roadtrip up to MN, WI, or MI! I'm curious - were you able to produce the toasty-like rind, Hex?

    I had read that this kind of cheese doesn't melt, but due to it's custard-like taste, maybe it would be good in a layered Napolean type of concoction with fruit. . .

    Looking forward to beginning culinary school next month! Hopefully that will help me to solidify my confidence enough to try some homemade juustoleipa one of these days!!!

    Thanks again all!

    Yours in the name of food,
    :D - Kim
     
  7. hexnymph

    hexnymph

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    I did not get the "toasty like rind" on the cheese, nor did I get very much of it.

    I was in the local Co-op yesterday and they had some for sale there that wasn't local (mostly it's in packaging from the grocery store)... Sorry I can't remember the brand but if I think of it, I'll post it when I do.

    Hex
     
  8. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Kidaly, I thought of you today in the upscale food store cheese section. I hadn't realized I had tasted this cheese, as the Finnish name hadn't stuck with me. I took some to my book club and it was a huge hit.

    The one I found was made by Fennimore Cheese of Fennimore, Wisconsin. It was priced at $9.99 per pound- a great incentive to learn to make your own! Here's their site.
     
  9. kidaly

    kidaly

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    Hi Mezz!

    Thank you so much for thinking of me and responding to my question about this cheese!

    I think I'll put that link in my internet favorites and when I can save up enough to order this in quantity I'll get some to 'play' with :) (and eat naturally - Yummy! :lips: )

    I'm glad you enjoyed it. May I ask how you served it?

    Thanks again!! - Kidaly :)
     
  10. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Very, very plainly. I nuked it for a short time (as directed on the package), cut it into bite-sized pieces and served it on toothpicks. Everyone raved about it! It's mild and rich-tasting. I never thought of putting preserves on it, but I bet it would be delicious. Kind of expensive to make a meal of. But it's very unusual in most of this country, so I'd not hesitate to serve it as an hors d'oeuvre with some type of piquant sauce (Pickapeppa or a good, fresh salsa of any kind). I can see why you're interested in making this yourself!

    Good luck, and good eating.
     
  11. kimbeeanna

    kimbeeanna

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    I just discovered this cheese at The Babcock Dairy Store on the University of Wisconsin campus. It looked tasty and interesting so I picked it up for the 4th celebration. It's priced better than other posts quoted, at $4.95 per pound. They have regular and jalapeño flavored. They suggested serving it warm with honey, jam, or salsa.
    Come get some - and make a weekend of it! Madison is a great place in the summer!
     
  12. greyeaglem

    greyeaglem

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    I think this is what around here they call bread cheese because it looks like a piece of grilled french toast. The package is labelled "bread cheese" (no sophisticates here!) so that's why I'm not sure what it really is. I get it at the local IGA. I usually cut it in strips and nuke it about 15 sec. and just eat it. Some people put jam on it. If you do that, I recommend a good strawberry jam or orange marmalade, or of course my favorite, tomato preserves. I once got a big piece of it from a friend of mine that wasn't baked, so I had to grill it. Someone brought it from a place here in the midwest where they make it, but I don't know where. I'll see if he remembers.
     
  13. shel

    shel Banned

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  14. gidget_81

    gidget_81

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    I used ot live in Finland and have had a facination with this cheese ever since. The first comment caught my attention... about eating this cheese with fruit or something sweet. Your on the right track. One of the most tradition ways to eat this cheese is to serve it warm with honey and cloud berries. Cloud berries are a slightly sour and it looks like an orange rasberry. If you can't get those lingin berries or lastly cranberries work. It is the flavor combonation of creamly, sweet, and sour that goes so wonderfully togeather. Now here is another random way to enjoy this cheese. my muma(finnish for Grandma) would always cut the cheese into small cube( wile cold) and make us herbal tea with honey and then drop a piece in the hot tea. It kind of serves as milk and as you drink the tea the cheese warms and it a perfect treat by the end. I know it sounds wierd but it is pretty tasty.
     
  15. maxine

    maxine

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    Juustoleipa is great fried with butter and topped with lingonberries or lingonberry jam.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013
  16. beckt

    beckt

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    Oh yes, I agree, Juustoleipa is really delicious. I prefer the ones made from reindeer milk, originally from Finland. Do you know what milk your Juustoleipa was made from?
     
  17. keith murphy

    keith murphy

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