Just got new knives?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by indiglofish61, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

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    When someone receives a new knife, does he or she need to take it to the sharpening stones or should that person wait till it is used a couple or more times?
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I've never bought a new knife that was dull out of the box, but I've read here that some Japanese knives aren't shipped sharp and some can (should?) be tuned up from the factory edge so some folks immediately sharpen. It really depends on the individual knife.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  3. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

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    I think I read that also, I'll just wait and see, have a good one!
     
  4. foody518

    foody518

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    You can try it out as it comes, but it may be more helpful to think of it as they take care of the overall grind, and you take care of the primary bevel (and if needed, right behind it)
     
  5. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

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    what is the best way to know what degree your holding the knife at? I am just beginning to learn all this about knife sharpening and types of steel and so on. and thanks for the info.
     
  6. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    What knife? Did you read what Karman35 posted in one of your other threads yesterday?

    Protractor can help in visualizing the angle on the stone. There are angle guides but I find them hard to use and never relied on them.

    It depends on a lot of factors. But if you want a suggestion on where to start - 15 degrees... if it's a two-sided knife made of a hard steel. And probably the same even if it's carbon steel. It's a lot easier doing that then trying to fiddle with splitting hairs of small angle differences until you get more experienced.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  7. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

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    What knife? well any knife, they all have an edge, I just want to know how to look at the knife I am sharpening and to know the angle I'm at.
     
  8. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    What Benuser just wrote, or a protractor and paper will give a visual reference. An index card might be the ideal compromise. Then take any knife and a cutting board to mimic the angles. You'll quickly see the differences and how easy or difficult it will be to hold at the various angles. After a while it gets easier to visualize (and perform) without aids but initially it may help to get the feel without the stones to build confidence. Sharpening knives is like many other things we want to learn - practice and a few mistakes along the way will build both experience and confidence.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016