June 2021 cooking theme/challenge: flour!

4,088
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
It's 107 outside. I can barely think about using a heat source in addition to that.
I agree. We were 107 yesterday. It cooled off to 97. 101 predicted tomorrow. I’ll wait until next week when it settles into high 80’s.

My Mom told me a long time ago that she never had a birthday cake as a kid. July stifling humidity and heat where she lived I bake her a cake most years since we now live in the “dry heat”.
 
4,644
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Joined Nov 5, 2007
I did home made pasta, will be posting it here later. But I did it on my night off, around 2 3 am. It was not 107F outside.

mjb.
 
4,088
918
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Sourdough starter. Not an entry (yet). Just a placeholder and IOU until the weather cools down enough to make me want to fire up the old brick oven and bake some bread.

This starter lives in my refrigerator and gets “revived” for baking with successive feedings at 100% hydration.

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2,371
956
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Sourdough starter. Not an entry (yet). Just a placeholder and IOU until the weather cools down enough to make me want to fire up the old brick oven and bake some bread.

This starter lives in my refrigerator and gets “revived” for baking with successive feedings at 100% hydration.

View attachment 70367
Nice!
I'm away for about a month. I hope my starter survives
 
4,088
918
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Squash blossom quesadilla

Assuming that Mexican masa counts as flour… submitted for your consideration.

Corn tortillas, queso (cheese), and squash blossom fried in Manteca (lard). Garnished with guacamole and salsa.

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A quick, simple, and tasty lunch.

… and for your amusement… from my garden… a “conjoined twin” squash… or is it “mother and child” squash?

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Joined Aug 20, 2010
Buckwheat pasta stuffed with cheese, potatoes and onions

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This is another regional classic from the east of Slovakia called tatarčané pirohy. It's basically a local variation on stuffed pasta which is known all over Eurasia and probably spread centuries ago with the Mongol invasion - so you have pelmeni in Russia, pierogi in Poland, Maultaschen in Bavaria and Schlutzkrapfen in Austria, shish barak in the Levant, manti in Turkey and so on, and of course, pirohy in Slovakia. It's basically the same idea - take a dough, roll it out, cut out pieces, stuff them with whatever you have and boil or fry them.

The eastern Slovak regions are among the poorest in the country and in the past, people could not always even afford wheat flour. Buckwheat was much cheaper, so somebody came with the idea to substitute part of the wheat for buckwheat. There are several stuffings in the region, some people use sauerkraut, sauerkraut with mushrooms, or even sauerkraut with meat, I believe I've heard. But I opted for something simpler - fresh cheese, boiled potatoes, fried onions and black pepper.

It's always served with some fatty sour cream, usually with some bacon, and you may garnish with dill or chives.
 
4,088
918
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Sourdough starter. Not an entry (yet). Just a placeholder and IOU until the weather cools down enough to make me want to fire up the old brick oven and bake some bread.

This starter lives in my refrigerator and gets “revived” for baking with successive feedings at 100% hydration.

View attachment 70367
Remember the sourdough starter? Well here’s the real entry for the flour challenge: bread crumbs!

I baked the bread and I must be waaaaay out of practice because all was going fine until I turned the loaf out of the banneton. It spread out like a pancake. When baked it looked more like a muffin top than a loaf of bread. Smelled great, had great crust and crumb, and tasted great but looked funny.

so “making lemonaid when life serves you lemons” it’s now been turned into breadcrumbs!

BEHOLD… YOUR WINNING ENTRY! LOL

and now that I’m thinking… I should have made panzanella out of it.

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2,371
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
Looks good!
Just a little time left.
I'm surprised I haven't seen pizza and/or apple pie yet
(Or stroopwafels, roti kukus, empanadas, dumplings, springrolls....)
But then there have been some unexpected dished :)
It's going to be awefully difficult to pick a favourite!
 
4,644
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Joined Nov 5, 2007
Behind schedule, but I do have some entries. Both very basic, classic uses of flour. First off, Alfredo's cousin from the French wine country, Andre Fettuccine pays him a visit.

The Players

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Flour. Eggs.

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St. Andre, a triple cream brie and some extra creaminess.

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And butter. Normally when I make fettuccine it includes just pasta, butter and cheese. But this is a little different.

The Process

You've all seen this before.

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A couple cups of flour, some eggs, pinch of salt. Mix it together, get a dough working. It took a while, but finally got a ball of workable dough formed. Could have used another egg yolk, I think.




Let it rest for a while, hydrate.

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Start working it through the machine.

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Get it nice nice and thin, cut it into the final shape.

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Get the salted water on the boil. Cut the cheese into small cubes, maybe 1/4 inch or so. Butter also cut into small cubes. Put the pasta into the boiling water. Put a big fry pan onto low heat. When pasta is about 95% cooked, grab some tongs and put it into the warm skillet. And don't worry about extra water getting added with the wet noodles.

Once pasta is in the skillet add in the cheese chunks, the butter chunks and stir. Drizzle in maybe a quarter, half cup of cream while stirring.

When the butter is melted, the cheese nice and gooey, add a small grate of nutmeg and a few drops of artificially flavored, processed perfume labeled white truffle oil into the mix. A few grinds of black pepper.

The Product

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A visually boring presentation, but Wow! This was really good! That cheese is so rich and smooth and decadent, the home made pasta is right on point. The white truffle oil was a bit of a gamble, but I used a pretty light hand and it worked out fine. A bit of green herb might have improved the looks, but there was no need to improve the taste.

And I tend to make the original, classic alfredo with butter and parm being the only dairy, no extra cream. And that might have worked well here, but I am not complaining about the extra creaminess.

This one is a keeper.

mjb.
 
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Joined Jul 16, 2013
Since im lazy i enter this outside competition!
Packed up and installed my new pizza oven last night.

Recipie:
785 gram 00 wheat flour
500 gram water
20 gram salt
5 gram fresh yeast.

Cold ferment 50ish hours.

Cooked tomato sauce and cheap mozzarella
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Pre heat stone to 410 degrees Celcius and launch!
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Cook and turn
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Final result was delicious!
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Joined May 4, 2005
So I have a very good pie crust formula that someone posted on this site years ago and it's my go to. I love it! Here is the best apple pie I've made to date.

Apples are pink ladys, filling is apples, cinnamon, flour, sugar, lemon juice and nutmeg, and salt.

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I like using flour as the thickening agent. It's actually very luscious, as long as you don't use too much. I dress the apples and let the liquid setup out for about 30 mins, then add the flour. The other very important ingredients are lemon juice and salt. Always.
 
4,644
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Joined Nov 5, 2007
I was planning on doing a pizza, cooked outside on the Weber Kettle. When it is 100 degrees F outside having an oven coming up to 500+ degrees in the kitchen is not appealing. We shall see if I get to it.
 
4,644
1,181
Joined Nov 5, 2007
One thing I did get around to making was some fajitas. It involved doing something I have never done before - making my own tortillas.

The Players


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Flour. As if you didn't expect that.

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Lard. Also a bit of baking soda and salt, and some water.

The Process

Salt and baking soda mixed into the flour. Lard and flour mix get to know each other.

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Add some hot water, work into a nice dough.

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Let dough rest while I start the charcoal. Form into balls, roll out.

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The night before marinated some skirt steak. Get that cooking on the grill, some peppers and onions as well.

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And a little homemade quac won't hurt.

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Dough balls rolled out as thin and as round as I can mange. Onto a lightly oiled hot cast iron griddle.

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The Product


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Wow.

I have never made flour tortillas before. I had no idea flour tortillas could be this good. So soft, and tender but still stretchy and chewy - I surprised myself. What a delicious delight!

mjb.
 

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