July 2020 Challenge - Italy

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Perhaps some clarification on what constitutes "Italian." Are Italian American dishes acceptable that are not from Italy such as spaghetti and meatballs or Chicken Parm etc? My $.02 is they should not be. :)
They can be included here, but I definitely prefer dishes from Italy. So to be honest, I am more likely to pick an Italian entry over an Italian-American one.

I think we're off to a really good start already!
 
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Chicken parmigiana
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Chicken parm at a diner.jpg

Chicken parmigiana, or chicken parmesan (Italian pollo alla parmigiana), is a dish that consists of breaded chicken breast covered in tomato sauce and mozzarella, parmesan, or provolone cheese. A slice of ham or bacon is sometimes added. It is also known colloquially in the United States as chicken parm and in Australia as a parma, parmi, or parmy.​
The dish originated from 20th-century Italian diaspora. It has been speculated that the dish is based on a combination of the Italian melanzane alla Parmigiana, a dish using breaded eggplant slices instead of chicken, with a cotoletta, a breaded veal cutlet generally served without sauce or cheese in Italy.​
Chicken parmigiana is included as the base of a number of different meals, including sandwiches and pies, and the meal is used as the subject of eating contests at some restaurants.​




* St.Joseph's day is March 19.
 
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* St.Joseph's day is March 19.

Oh no... yes, you’re correct... how did I make such a goof. I may have committed a sacrilege... I might have to forfeit my baptism.
 
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Chicken parmigiana
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Chicken parm at a diner.jpg

Chicken parmigiana, or chicken parmesan (Italian pollo alla parmigiana), is a dish that consists of breaded chicken breast covered in tomato sauce and mozzarella, parmesan, or provolone cheese. A slice of ham or bacon is sometimes added. It is also known colloquially in the United States as chicken parm and in Australia as a parma, parmi, or parmy.​
The dish originated from 20th-century Italian diaspora. It has been speculated that the dish is based on a combination of the Italian melanzane alla Parmigiana, a dish using breaded eggplant slices instead of chicken, with a cotoletta, a breaded veal cutlet generally served without sauce or cheese in Italy.​
Chicken parmigiana is included as the base of a number of different meals, including sandwiches and pies, and the meal is used as the subject of eating contests at some restaurants.​




* St.Joseph's day is March 19.
Wikipedia is wrong, bubba. Chicken Parm is not from Italy. :)

The key words that you may have overlooked in the Wikipedia explanation are the words "italian diaspora." That phrase means the Italian immigration to the US from many different regions of Italy during the late 19th and early to mid 20th centuries. The dish was invented in the US and as the Wikipedia article states, it may have been inspired by the similar Melanzone alla Parmigiana or "eggplant Parmesan."

Cheers! :)
 
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Hmmm... my problem here is nor whether its 'authentic' Italian or diaspora Italian (please don't fight over that). I'm a creative cook - or a least, all I can say is that is why I cook. So that means that what I make won't follow a 'classic' Italian recipe. I will probably riff on one. It doesn't really matter though because I really don't plan on winning given the difficulty of judging the last round. :)
 
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I mean, if we are restricted to "authentic" Italian dishes, what about the fresh pasta I make with a sauce thrown together with what I already have. Is that not Italian? Is that not the Italian way?

Spaghetti with meatballs and chicken parm should most definitely be allowed 😚
 
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Still ... brought by and created by Italians.
Yes, but what jamoke decided it was Ok to put mozzarella on a cutlet instead of parmigiana??? Phooey on that - if you are making parmigianaa then God's sake put Parmigiano-Reggiano on the damned thing and not just "pizza cheese".
 
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You're comparing apples and oranges my friend.




"We work in kitchens. ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
 
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You're comparing apples and oranges my friend.
Mmmm - I don't know - maybe more like a Northern Spy and a Golden Delicious. I mean if the OP is looking for "authentic" Italian why not educate ourselves beyond what we think we know? Get out of our comfort zones so to speak. I've been looking into this and frankly there are some things I've been doing - not wrong, but not right either - like paring pastas with sauces.
 
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This is cooking. There are NO rules. If you make something and people are happy to eat it ... it's fine. It's 2020. "Authentic" is a term of ancient history. If you go in a radius of 2-clicks of any neighborhood of any cuisine you will find 741,263 different "authentic" recipes of any given dish. "Authentic" recipes are only found in dusty old cookbooks archived in dustier older vaults.
 
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If it was your challenge that might be fine, however it is not so, so as usual there will be an attempt at a consensus, but at the end of the day it comes down to what slayertplsko slayertplsko had in mind for his challenge. The last word is yours if you want - I'm going to work on my "Italian".
 
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Right now I'm just working on conversation. You're taking this way too personal. It's not personal it's strictly business.



* NO bonus points. The movie reference is way too easy. ... I've set you up for the absolute best comeback too.
 
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