Job advice in Hotels and Cruise ships

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by miccru, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. miccru

    miccru

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    Line Cook
    I worked for a High Volume fine dining restaurant before in Miami,Fl and now currently working in a high volume restaurant.

    Now I'm 1 year of experience I was thinking of working in a Hotel or a Cruise trip;however,the only thing that is holding me back is I'm afraid of failing and getting fired because I didn't do a good job or I'm not capable of doing the job right.

    I have the heart, passion and the love of my work and food but do I have to pluck my feathers and stop being a chickens and face my fears

    Yours truly Miccru /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif
     
  2. mediumrareplz

    mediumrareplz

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    I have 3 years fine dining experience. The best thing I did after my first cooking job: took a summer job in another state, where I knew nothing and nobody. I took the skills I acquired at my first job and applied them to the new job and learned something new, either from the chef, but mostly from the other line cooks, every day. You want to learn? I say take risks where you can gain experience and learn technique from the chefs or cooks.

    The one thing I've heard about cruise ships is, you're doing a "continental" style in a buffet setting. I don't how much you can learn from working in a cruise ship.
     
  3. lagom

    lagom

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    Ive never worked on a cruise ship but know several people that have. It is tough, long hours and generally hard work. I know from being a passenger on a few boats that there are buffet and a la carte restaurants on them. You can probly learn to cook large volume food of decent quality in a strict, well cordinated disaplined setting in close quarters. It might no be a bad thing to do for a while. Plus you'll probly make some good contact from around the world while your there.
     
  4. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    I think changing ur setting and enviroment when cooking is great. 

    Usually when i move to a new state or country i learn lots of new things. 

    I waiter i work with has worked in cruise ships , he remembers working like a dog for hours ( 16+) barely getting sleep , and making sh*t pay. 

    That and barely got a day off. Its something he said , you can do once or twice in your life, but you never stay too long ( at most a year or a few months ) then when you get back to land , you never wanna work on a boat again XD . 
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Quote:
    And if that were to happen,... what would happen? Have you ever watched a baby learning to walk? They fall on their butts, almost immediately and often, but they don't think of themselves as failures.

    Use the enthusiasm of a baby doing the drunken sailor walk as your role model and go for the job on the cruise ship.

    Working on a boat is a great learning experience and not just about kitchen skills. You will learn a lot about other people and cultures as well. In addition, working on a cruise ship can teach you an immense amount about yourself. It is a hard job, long hours, non existent time off, living and working in cramped spaces with a melting pot of different ethnicities.

    My experience on a cruise line was 16-18 hour work days for 30 straight days before getting a week off.

    Put your fears aside, you will do fine because
     
    lagom likes this.