jerk seasoning, not scratch made

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by raibeaux, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hi.  By chance, have any of you tried McCormick Jerk Seasoning?  If so, what do you think.  Distributor won't splilt, and am gunshy about buying a case of the stuff.  Just need something to introduce myself to jerk.  Actually, I've never even tasted jerk before.  Thanks.
     
  2. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Most of the  jerk type seasonings are pretty good( I am talking food service types. You can alter them by adding things if you like..
     
  3. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Thanks much, I appreciate it.  I think I'll give it a try.  Anything particular you would add to it to spruce it up?  Also, any suggestions as to what items to use it on?  Trying to come up with something different for my restaurant, and never tried it before.   Do you add oil and make a slurry or use it straight as a seasoning or both?  Thanks again.
     
  4. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    I would check with a different supplier or one of the local markets. Your purveyor may have reasons for not splitting but you should not have to saddle yourself with a case of something you may not use. All jerk seasonings will be somewhat similar, not exact but similar. Otherwise they would be called something else. So if you have to try a different brand, so be it. You might also ask other chefs in your area what they use. They might let you come over and try some. 
     
  5. jimbo68

    jimbo68

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    If you are looking for McCormick spices, I don't see a reason why it is not available by the single jar at most any supermarket.  If not on the shelf, it could probably be ordered.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2013
  6. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Depends on taste of clientel  and can they handle some heat?
     
  7. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Pork and chicken are popular jerk options.  I'll suggest testing with some chicken wings, heavily seasoned and baked.  And perhaps some boneless country style ribs. grilled to give yourself an idea of jerk flavoring, see what direction you may want to take it for starters.

    There used to be this place in Palo Alto that marinated wings in a really nice, spicy jerk sauce, very good!  I never did get to try their curried goat.

    mjb.
     
  8. durangojo

    durangojo

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    raibeaux,

    since you have never even tasted jerk, i suggest a good place to start would be to buy a small jar from the supermarket to test your liking of it.....it is very very easy to make so if you find that you do like it, i would also suggest that you make your own blend...as with most dry rubs, it keeps indefinitely ....jerk seasoning needs nothing to 'spruce' it up...in fact quite the opposite depending on the heat level.....a lot of times you will want something alongside to calm it down and compliment it, such as a mango or melon salsa or a chutney.  jerk is served throughout the caribbean with rice and beans. you can use jerk seasoning either as a dry rub or wet, but making a wet mixture is more than just adding oil to a dry blend....it's quite layered actually...molasses, tamarind paste or mango chutney and lime juice all add depth.  rub on pork, turkey & chicken(inside and out),wings, fish, ribs, vegetables..the sky's the limit. to me it is best on something to be grilled. wet mix doesn't last as long as dry.

    i am curious though, what perked your ears up about jerk if you have never had it? will this go over in arkansas? what type of restaurant do you have.....after you try this on your own, try running it as a special to test the waters......it is a wonderful, wonderful seasoning...actually more of a way of eating, but it is definitely not for everyone.

    joey
     
  9. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hi, and thanks for the replies.  We do a lot of barbeque, ribs, pork and brisket.  Also steaks, and quite a bit more, including catfish.

    I don't think the heat will be too offputting, but if it is, I can always tone it done some.  I've been here 20 years, and it's time to veture forth, so to speak, with a few new dishes.

    If I can find a good recipe for the jerk, I'm going to give it a shot.  If it doesn't work, it'll only cost me a few free meals.  Also, I have a lot of regular customers that will try anything I put in front of them...at least once.  Feedback should be interesting.

    Thanks again for the help.

    P.S.

    I'm still looking for that "ONE THING", as Billy Crystal might say.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  10. durangojo

    durangojo

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    I would be happy to share my dry jerk spice blend if you like as a place to start..the wet mix too....a wet one sounds like it would be right up your alley perfect for your venue though...
    not a matter of heat per se but certainly is a big factor...it's the balance and the bigger picture and how great it is when done right...kinda like true BBQ or Cajun cooking....if you have a jerk joint within reasonable driving distance, I would urge you to go there first....let them show you what it 's all about and all the possibilities. as i mentioned before it is not just a seasoning as much as it is a way of cooking..a way of life

    Joey
    If you venture out to try it on hour own, i would recommend a pork loin rubbed and marinated with a wet mop, then grilled....try it with a grilled pineapple salsa....black bean and rice, chayotes or plantains make for nice sides

    Joey.
     
  11. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    One good thing about buying one already made is that  every time it is applied it will be consistant and the same. Where if you make your own, it could vary.
     
  12. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hi.  I would love to have your recipe, Durangojo.  How would you use it on the pork loin..been eyeing pork loin for months as an addition.  Having it not dry out is a little concerning, probably need to experiment.  How would you do the loin?

    Chef Ed, any suggestions/recipe for using the "bought" seasoning?  These are new waters for me.

    There are no jerk shops around that I know of.  We live in a small town (9000) in a small state.  Maybe there's a restaurant in Little Rock that serves jerk.  I'll check and go try it, although I wouldn't know if they were doing it "right" or not.  However, it would give me a chance to at least taste it, and probably be able to adjust seasonings if necessary.  At least I'd know what part of it I don't like and maybe could alter the taste/heat somewhat.

    Any help from you guys would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Ray
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  13. chefdta

    chefdta

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    Jerked ribs or wings (wet marinade), beans and rice, mango-habanero salsa/salad/slaw etc. sells well here in S. Florida.
     
  14. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    There must be plenty of recipes online for jerk seasoning. Find one and mix your own. If it tastes good and the customers buy it, you did a good job. 
     
  15. durangojo

    durangojo

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    yes raibeaux, chefwriter is right, there are pleny of jerk seasoning recipes online. the 'wet' rub i like is from the epicurious website for jamaican jerk chicken, which pairs perfectly with pork and fish.....the dry one is nice because you can make a batch and keep it indefinitely...here's mine....

    2 tsp. ground red pepper or 1 tsp ground habanero chile pepper

    2 tbl allspice

    1 tbl ground nutmeg

    4 tsp salt

    4 tsp sugar....i use light brown

    1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

    2 tbl chopped dried onion

    11/2 tsp granulated onion powder

    2 tbl granulated garlic powder

    1 1/2 tsp dried thyme

    1 1/2 tsp mustard seeds

    1/8 tsp ground cloves

    1 1/2 tsp orange peel

    use a spice grinder, mortar and pestle or fp to grind all ingredients.

    hope this helps to jumpstart your adventure into caribbean cuisine

    joey
     
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  16. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Hey, Joey, thanks much.  I appreciate it.

    I'll round up the spices and start experimenting Monday.  I understand you can mix the spice mix with oil, do you think that's a good thing or maybe go with it dry AND wet to play with it.

    Thanks again.

    Don't have the foggiest idea what jerk's supposed to taste like, but I'll let my customers decide if I did it right.  My guess is they will.

    Small town (9000) in a small state (arkansas).  Oh well, had the restaurant for twenty-one years, 'bout time I got adventurous.  Cast a wider net, etc.
     
  17. durangojo

    durangojo

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    jamaican jerk in arkansas? hmmm...could be interesting for sure..... ask your vendor to give you a sample of both their dry jerk seasoning and their 'wet' glaze if they carry it.....i  guess i am just soo curious what has given you such a bug to serve jerk in the first place, only because it is something  that you've never even tasted...'jerked' food is truly a great thing, but you do have to know how to balance it( like you do jalapenos,thai or other spicy peppered food)..... if you have owned your restaurant for 21 years,i'm guessing you have a pretty good handle on your customer base.  perhaps a good place to start woud be jerk chicken wings first, as a bar menu special. jerk wings are very popular, easy and not an expensive investment

    21 years is a long time to be in the same restaurant... you must be doing something very right there...congratulations to you as that ain't  always easy breezy... good luck

    joey

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Jamaican-Jerk-Chicken-234807
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  18. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Actually, just trying to come up with something fun and different, for both the customers and myself.  I've heard and read about it forever, just never gave it a try.

    I don't know if it'll go over, but I think they'll give it a try.  Here's why:

    Just guessing, but pretty close I think, about what the population around here has eaten:

    Wild Deer meat.......90%

    Deer Liver................5%

    Racoon...................60%

    Squirrel...................80%

    Possom...................2%

    Armadillo................10%

    Wild Turkey.............30%

    Wild Hog.................10%

    Dove........................40%

    Wild Duck................60%

    Wild Goose..............10%

    Fried Chicken Gizzards........75%

    Chitlins......................30%

    Catfish....................100%

    Buffalo Fish..............30%

    Gar Fish...................10%

    Other Wildcaught Freshwater Fish...............100%

    Wild caught frog legs.....40%  The farmed stuff ain't the same...tastes funny compared to the real thing.  Probably can't jump as high, either.

    Beaver.....................Not too many

    Snake......................Not too many

    They'll jump at the chance to try the jerk since I don't charge for anything they don't like, plus give them a gift certificate for their next trip for their time.  This is gonna be fun.  Or not.

    My favorite part of the chicken for double-breaded deep-frying....the neck.

    The problem is, can't sell most of this stuff.  If I could, I'd need a colosseum to seat them.

    My latest experiment is Miso soup.  Gonna try that on them this week.  Don't sell any other Japanese stuff, though.  What the heck, only cost me a little bit, and I'll drink up what's left over anyway.

    Ever hear of a BBQ/steak/comfort food restaurant serving Miso soup?  Me neither.  Next time I smoke I'm gonna use red miso as a base for a rub on a butt and a slab of ribs.  Just sounds interesting to me.  I've thrown away food before.
     
  19. durangojo

    durangojo

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    Just a thought raibeaux since you're out on new adventures...replacing your miso soup idea with pho(rice noodle soup). pho has much deeper flavors, more oomph and is total comfort food....beef, chicken, shrimp and tofu can be used but I doubt that tofu would be as popular, but who knows.....as I said, just a thought.

    joey
     
  20. raibeaux

    raibeaux

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    Ok, an update.  Got a jerk sauce that's good.  I'm using jerk seasoning on the chicken wings before breading with plain AP flour.  Deep-frying at 335 for 14 minutes, then tossing in the sauce.  Most popular is when I add a small amount of slightly-sweet mustard-based BBQ sauce to the jerk sauce.  Seems to give it just a tad of background sweetness and a slightly different taste.

    Hardest problem is getting people to try it.  That's ok, though.  20 years ago I was the only one selling $20 aged steaks.  Took a long time, since they could buy three steak dinners at Western Sizzlin' at that time for about the same money.

    The ones that like the jerk are crazy about it.  And they're talking it up, so there's still hope.

    P.S.

    The Miso Soup brainstorm never panned out.
     
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