Japanese steel - how to take care of it?

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Joined Apr 3, 2008
I was gifted with this beautiful Takeda Hamono knife isn’t it gorgeous? I need some help taking care of it. I wash it after each use and dry it immediately but it is starting to rust and I’ve only had it for a week! What am I doing wrong? FF7928E1-E419-4420-94F3-54DD44EA432D.jpeg
 
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I can’t answer the question because washing and dryin carbon steel knives always has been rust-free for me. But mine aren’t Japanese so maybe there is a difference.

I’m in awe of and the packaging. But what has me in absolute awe is that perfectly peeled potato!
 
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Oh... I use the hottest water I can get out of the faucet... to help evaporate any invisible residual water survives the drying cloth.
 
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
Takeda makes some great knives. Try a baking soda slurry rub down. Also 3M 3000 grit wet dry automotive sandpaper to take off some rust as it shows up. For forcing a patina cutting a bunch of meat is good.

Other maintenance tips
-I would stay away from honing steels. It's not necessary and you could get chipping
-wash it tip down so water doesnt get in the handle
-mineral oil/ beeswax can help repel water from the handle
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
You can get a "rust eraser" maybe at Korin since you're in NYC. It works well to remove rust and not mess with the kurouchi finish too much. If you can't find one PM me I might have a spare floating around. The other thing is after washing and drying try a little mineral oil on the blade especially if you go out of town. Even relative humidity will cause carbon to rust.

Takeda's are well made knives his metallurgy is top shelf and you were well gifted. The next thing will be stones to keep it tip top and then hours of watching Youtube videos on sharpening technique - welcome to the rabbit hole - LOL.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
Takeda makes some great knives. Try a baking soda slurry rub down. Also 3M 3000 grit wet dry automotive sandpaper to take off some rust as it shows up. For forcing a patina cutting a bunch of meat is good.

Other maintenance tips
-I would stay away from honing steels. It's not necessary and you could get chipping
-wash it tip down so water doesnt get in the handle
-mineral oil/ beeswax can help repel water from the handle
I will keep this in mind thank you
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
You can get a "rust eraser" maybe at Korin since you're in NYC. It works well to remove rust and not mess with the kurouchi finish too much. If you can't find one PM me I might have a spare floating around. The other thing is after washing and drying try a little mineral oil on the blade especially if you go out of town. Even relative humidity will cause carbon to rust.

Takeda's are well made knives his metallurgy is top shelf and you were well gifted. The next thing will be stones to keep it tip top and then hours of watching Youtube videos on sharpening technique - welcome to the rabbit hole - LOL.
Thanks yes it’s a beautiful gift. Can I use any kind of oil or must it be mineral oil? As for sharpening, there is a professional knife sharpener in my area I like to patronize.
 

phatch

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Staff member
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Mineral oil is preferred because it won't go rancid, such as around the joint of the handle and the blade where it is hard to get all oil out during cleaning. Also won't go sticky on the wood and is a food safe oil.

Patina is a form of controlled rust that mostly neutralizes the reactivity of the blade surface. One will form slowly anyway unless you actively remove it. Forcing the patina means to use a method to accelerate the patina formation intentionally. Off the top of my head we've talked about using things like potato, banana, vinegar, mustard and so on.

Using produce, you just stick the blade inside of a potato or two for a time.


With the texture on your blade a potato may not give you an even enough patina, so a vinegar bath would probably be better.

A green scotch brite and some scouring powder will remove a patina.
 
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