Japanese knives' advices

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by shibby, Nov 9, 2014.

  1. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Hello,

    I'm currently looking for 1 or 2 knives, so I was thinking of finding those by myself on the internet but it was not as easy as it sounds.

    There are a lot of brand, a lot of knives with a lot of different reviews.

    So I thought about asking in a forum where people can share their experiences and knowledge.

    Hence if anybody has some advice about a brand, a specific model or anything else I would appriciate.

    I am looking for a japanese style knife, with a preference for a Petty, and a Santoku or a Gyuto.

    My budget is not set in stone, I'm willing to pay for high quality knives so it depends on the ratio price/quality of the knives. Ideally, 150-300$ by knives would be good, but as I said if the knife is worth it I would consider spending more.

    I plan to buy a new sharpening stone in order to keep the knives sharp.

    I hope to hear some news soon.
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Welcome to CT, Shibby.  Have you used the search feature here?  Your question has been asked and answered a hundred times.  I myself have answered it at least 20 times!  No need to type if all out again, there's some great info already written here.  Former member/member emeritus BDL has a great primer here as well.
     
  3. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Hi Phaedrus.

    Thanks for your welcome, I am glad to be here.

    I already checked a lot of post on this forum, indeed most of them were answered by BDL.

    But it seems to me that the response depends on the person rather than a general rule or ranking.

    I did not took the time to read all the posts or comments on the forum though.

    My main issue here is that I have read a tons of different reviews about different brands. Once a brand is the best you can find and the other time it's the contrary. I am pretty sure there is no "super knife" or "number one brand" but I am kind of lost between all those opposite reviews. Thus, when I find a new review which by chance does not shatter the impression I have from a previous one, it gives me another lead to look for.

    So far I have seen a lot of different knives and could not tel which one are truly better, or at least worth their price.

    I do not have the time right now but I try to check for further information on the forum.

    Anyway thanks for your quick reply, have a nice day.
     
  4. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    No problem.  It depends a lot on where you are and what you want to do with the knife.  It's always going to be a trade off.  For starters, in what country do you reside?  No use in recommending something if you can't get it where you life.
     
  5. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Yeah I guess the location influence the recommendation.

    I'm living in France.
     
  6. chefboyog

    chefboyog

    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    21
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Tojiro DP Gyutou 21cm.

    I bought one of these last month 72$ in Canada. I like it.
    Tried to post a pic for you but something is wonky with the servers...
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,498
    Likes Received:
    165
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    We do need a new post entitled, "Where you can buy when you're living in wherefrom."

    JapaneseChefKnives ships worldwide for $7 as you might have noticed.  There is a recent post listing places to buy if you're in Europe.

    But there is no definitive answers as to what knives will best suite you unless you have definitive answers to cover what you are partial to.  You've read a lot about profiles, handles and alloys here, along with faux Damascus and other superficials.  You're going to have to sort and put that together for yourself.

    In the end there are lots of very good knives which you can't go too far wrong with.

    I'll make some definitive statements to cover one important area.  The Iminishi combination stone is a very good one for the money, and get yourself a 12" Idahone for truing and touchups.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  8. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I was actually going to mention JCK.  Absolutely great vendor, Koki will hook you up with exactly what you want.  Sorry I sounded curt, that wasn't meant as a reproach but rather a suggestion to dig into the advice already written.  As for suggestions my love for the Kagayaki CarboNext is well documented here.  Great knives for the money.  Moritaka knives are also great if you like Aogami steel (and c'mon, who doesn't?).  You can't go wrong with Konosuke either.
     
  9. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Thanks for all those advices. I'm still digging into the advices alreay written, and taking into consideration yours.

    Is it easier for you if I give you more information about what I am looking for, how I plan to use them so on and so forth?
     
  10. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I don't have great knives, I wanted to bought real ones for a while now.

    Currently I am using a knife from ikea which I sharpen with a ceramic sharpener.

    The plan is to buy a sharpening stone along with the knives.

    I already know how to sharpen a knife with a sharpening stone so I am not affraid of this improvement.
     
  11. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Thanks.
    I am looking at Kagayaki, Misono and Hiromoto on JCK they seems pretty good.

    Where do you stand on Konosuke HD? I heard about them quite some time on this forum especially from the famous BDL.

    I am not affraid to pay the price for the quality so the budget is not really an issue, unless you propose me a knife which costs over $1 000. But still I would be glad to knew its name though.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  12. mrbushido

    mrbushido

    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    i have the konosuke hd2 270mm gyuto and love it but its a laser so not good for everything and hard use.
     
  13. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    It seems that those lasers are pretty different from the other knives.

    What is the big deal with them?

    Is it that hard to start with a laser?
     
  14. mrbushido

    mrbushido

    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    thinner more fragile more chippy harder to sharpen etc
     
  15. torchskitchen

    torchskitchen

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    I bought my primary chef's knife from japaneseknifeimports.com  If you contact "Jon" the owner he will provide you the best customer service without trying to sell you high end product that you may not want/need. I specifically purchased the Gesshin Ginga 240mm Stainless Wa-Gyuto for $250. I have not had to sharpen the knife since I bought it in July. 
     
  16. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I think that's overstated by quite a bit.  I've done quite a few Moritakas and found them to be no worse than any other handmade kurouichi knife.  I do have a personal one in my kit that had an undergrind; that was interesting!  Most folks would have had to send it back but I had no trouble spiffing it up.  At any rate they're at least as good as a Takeda.  Most of those kind of knives can have some "quirks" to them.  Any good reputable vendor will stand behind the knife though and make sure you get a good one and fix it if you don't.
     
  17. shibby

    shibby

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I feel lost with all those brands, pros and cons, etc

    I get that laser required more experience, but still I am considering of buying one along with two others in order to get used to it because they seem to be pretty good knives.

    But what can I buy in order to keep them around me without being disappointed later?
     
  18. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,500
    Likes Received:
    480
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    If you want a laser thin gyuto, and are aware of the usage/maintenance warnings, I'd say go for it.  A thin knife will cruise through onions like a dream. No wedging on carrots or potatoes :)  but be extra careful to not torque the blade, no rock chopping, no bones.

    On the plus side, maybe maintenance is easier.   Since they are so thin to begin with, you don't need to thin as much when you sharpen.  As a home user, just sharpening the edge normally can probably get you by for years without noticeable performance decrease, and that much is easy to learn.  You can be an adequately good at basic sharpening in a few sessions.
     
  19. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,498
    Likes Received:
    165
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    The whole laser thing is very relative.  The 10" Vic rosewood I recently bought to do a review on is 2.46mm (.96") at the spine above the heal, very close to a typical laser, plus it has a full distill taper which the Kono laser does not really.   I easily put a 3deg secondary bevel in with a 1K stone, bringing the edge thickness from .4mm to .25 (.010").  Convexing of the edge gives added perceived thinness.  Thinning the tip reasonably did take a bench grinder though (I'll finish that when I have access to a belt sander).  Not real laser numbers but very close.  Nothing I can do about the mediocre steel of course.

    Anyways the Vic glides effortlessly through potatoes and not bad with carrots either, and a citrus seed is not going to harm the edge at all, nor do I have to fear carving a chicken or working around cow bone, though there is really no need for me to do that.

    And of course other knives mentioned here are better non-laser options to this Vic.

    Rick
     
  20. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,579
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Which vendor?  I've purchased mine only from CKTG, no problems on that front.  But I've seen about the same amount of badly done Takedas as Moritakas, so it's always important to buy from a vendor that stands behind whatever you're buying.