Ja Jang Ribs (Korean fermented black bean glazed pork ribs with maple soy)

5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Just writing the title of this thread alone made me salivate. But then there's that video... where she spends too little time describing the dish that seems truly scrumptuous.

Anyone has any idea how this could be made, or knows of a recipe (if it's any kind of classic in Korean cuisine)? I suppose I could just thin out black bean paste to glaze the ribs while they grill.... but is that all? Should I add tons of garlic, ginger, white vinegar, mirin....?? Of course I could just experiment making different recipes once a week until I find something I love... hehehe...

The Ja Jang ribs start being discussed at around 9:50 into the video:

 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,378
983
Joined Mar 29, 2002
I was going to do a black bean paste rib for the smoker. I was thinking of using the steamed black bean ribs common in dim sum as my inspiration. And maybe using the black bean laoganma sauce as part of the base for the spicy challenge
 
2,292
896
Joined Jan 8, 2010
No idea FF, but it sounds delicious
Gotta find my black bean sauce...
Or even see if I got chili bean paste and I can post in the monthly challenge
 
5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Thanks for the answers! So after watching your video teamfat I headed to the store and realized perhaps I didn't have the right fermented bean paste? Mine is the Healthy Boy brand, it looks more brown than black, and it's Thai. I'll have to find some other uses for that (not sure what).

healthyboy.jpg

So I went to the store and bought some new stuff that I've never used before. Tonight should be a fun night. Any feedback you may have on these ingredients is more than welcome!

IMG_2125.jpg
 
4,618
1,131
Joined Nov 5, 2007
The stubby jar with the yellowish lid looks like what you want. The gochujang in the red tub is a very popular Korean ingredient, very tasty, good in a lot of dishes. I have no idea what that is on the right.

mjb.
 
5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
The stubby jar with the yellowish lid looks like what you want. The gochujang in the red tub is a very popular Korean ingredient, very tasty, good in a lot of dishes. I have no idea what that is on the right.

mjb.
Thank you mjb.

Yes that stubby jar is what I bought after watching the video you shared, so thanks for that. I've never had Gochijuang before but it's in so many Korean recipes I just had to give it a try. They have huge buckets of the stuff (got the tiniest I could find) so I'm assuming they use a LOT of it.

The Thai Dancer paste is called "Chili paste in bean oil (mild)" and the ingredients listed are Shallots, Garlic, Sugar, Soybean Oil, Dried Chili, Dried Shrimp, Fish Sauce, Tamarind. Surely can't be bad right? On the sticker a very European-and-not-Thai-at-all-looking ham and lettuce sub sandwhich is featured with a little bowl of the stuff next to it. Surely some kind of condiment.

Ok so I'm just too curious, I'm opening the jar.

Wow so that's not at all what I expected! Very dense, tightly packed stuff, lots of oil. Very pungent. Tastes a bit fishy and very shrimpy. Not the kind of flavor I'm used to and I'm not sure I'd use it as a condiment, but I can see how that would add tons of umami to a sauce for noodles or rice or something.

On the far right is a pack of Korean noodles. This was the toughest thing for me to choose. I stood in front of the huge Asian noodle shelves with no idea what they were. So many of them, and I didn't know what to take so I took those kinda randomly.
 
2,292
896
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Your Thai dancer sounds like nam prik pao.
I use it a lot as base for noodle soups.
It tastes quite different from the chili bean paste I am used to (lee kum kee)
 
106
36
Joined Mar 8, 2015
Thank you mjb.

Yes that stubby jar is what I bought after watching the video you shared, so thanks for that. I've never had Gochijuang before but it's in so many Korean recipes I just had to give it a try. They have huge buckets of the stuff (got the tiniest I could find) so I'm assuming they use a LOT of it.

The Thai Dancer paste is called "Chili paste in bean oil (mild)" and the ingredients listed are Shallots, Garlic, Sugar, Soybean Oil, Dried Chili, Dried Shrimp, Fish Sauce, Tamarind. Surely can't be bad right? On the sticker a very European-and-not-Thai-at-all-looking ham and lettuce sub sandwhich is featured with a little bowl of the stuff next to it. Surely some kind of condiment.

Ok so I'm just too curious, I'm opening the jar.

Wow so that's not at all what I expected! Very dense, tightly packed stuff, lots of oil. Very pungent. Tastes a bit fishy and very shrimpy. Not the kind of flavor I'm used to and I'm not sure I'd use it as a condiment, but I can see how that would add tons of umami to a sauce for noodles or rice or something.

On the far right is a pack of Korean noodles. This was the toughest thing for me to choose. I stood in front of the huge Asian noodle shelves with no idea what they were. So many of them, and I didn't know what to take so I took those kinda randomly.
Ahhh. you needed to take me to the market with you to read the labels. Yes, the yellow lid one is the correct bean paste for your application. Asshi is a well known brand. It is used as the base for the flour noodles sauce. Ja Jang Mein. The red cube GoChooJang is the base for a large amount of Korean soups, tofu hot pot, and base of many dishes, duk bok ki, (rice sticks in spicy sauce) I like the CJ brand. The chili paste in bean oil is for Thai cooking. I have had it in Prik King.
 
5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Ahhh. you needed to take me to the market with you to read the labels. Yes, the yellow lid one is the correct bean paste for your application. Asshi is a well known brand. It is used as the base for the flour noodles sauce. Ja Jang Mein. The red cube GoChooJang is the base for a large amount of Korean soups, tofu hot pot, and base of many dishes, duk bok ki, (rice sticks in spicy sauce) I like the CJ brand. The chili paste in bean oil is for Thai cooking. I have had it in Prik King.
Thanks! Haha well there's nothing I would love more than shopping with someone who knows that culture and can help and advise me. When are you coming to France? :emoji_laughing:

Ok so now I definitely have to try Ja Jang Mein.

Re: GoChooJang, once I'm done with that stash I'll try the CJ brand, I'm pretty sure I saw it at the store.

Are you Korean then? :)
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,378
983
Joined Mar 29, 2002
Here's my chili oil black bean ribs waiting for the smoker. IMG_20210505_101736599.jpg

I was rubbing my paste on with the back of a spoon so it didn't do the narrow edge. More details in the spicy challenge.
 
2,292
896
Joined Jan 8, 2010
5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Totally agree with the shesimmers website. Shame she changed the format though.
Off topic, another good one to check out is Andrea Ngyuen's " vietworldkitchen". Obviously not for korean or thai food ;)
I just checked vietworldkitchen and I liked some of the content however I'm confused by the navigation. Am I supposed to either search or jump from one link to another? I couldn't find a list of categories or a list of recipes? Thanks for sharing your resources, they're invaluable. :)
 
2,292
896
Joined Jan 8, 2010
I see what you mean.
There used to be a detailed recipe index, but I can't find it anymore
 
2,403
410
Joined Oct 9, 2008
For reference's sake, think of gochujang as chili-flavored (and not just a hint, btw) miso. You can use it exactly the same ways as you might use miso, and get that same intense salt-umami-sweet flavor, but gochujang also has a dense, complex chili flavor.

As an example, you can find zillions of recipes online for miso-glazed broiled fish, usually cod. Try that with a 50/50 mix of miso and gochujang and see what you think. I think "genius!" but there are others who would be horrified.

There is also doenjang, which is again rather like miso but with that weird, fermented, funky taste cranked to the nth degree. Crazy levels of umami, but you have to like that funky smell and taste.

For me, mixing doenjang, gochujang, and maybe a little miso to soften the edges makes an amazing marinade which can and should be cooked in if possible, as for example by broiling. In that kind of context I find miso a little "meh" unless the fish and the miso are spectacularly good and the person doing the cooking is ridiculously more skilled than I am.
 
Top Bottom