I've mastered cooking porkchops.

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Joined Jun 27, 2017
Over past 6 months or so I've pretty much nailed cooking any porkchop perfectly. I just thought I'd share it here to see what people have to say. First off I'd like to note that there is salt that does get retained, I think depending on what kind of salt I use, the cut of meat, and how long I let it sit out somehow determines the saltiness of the meat. I personally find it to be overwhelming flavor wise sometimes, then other times it's less overwhelming. Everyone who's tried my porkchops says they're the best porkchops they've ever eaten and the pork flavor is really brought out.

So here's what I do.

1) I cover my porkchops in salt (I've used various different kinds, haven't figured out which is best), I'll make sure the sides and top/bottom are completely salted. Leave them sitting in a plate for 2-3 hours depending on their size and then pour the juice out and wash them off then pat dry. This is to make the meat super tender.

2) Don't add anymore salt, a lot of the salt depending on what kind you used and how you covered your meat with it will determine how much of the salty flavor the meat will retain. Just add pepper and push it into the pork.

3) I personally don't like using a lot of oil because it pops all over the place, so fill the pan with a tad bit of oil. Then place the porkchops on there, I immediately shake my pan to make sure the porkchops don't stick, if needed use a spoon to get them slipping around.

4) For me I use a regular pan and a electric stove, so I turn it slightly above medium heat and let (2inch) the porkchops stay on one side for about 3-4 minutes. Then I flip it over and do the same. After I get both sides color'd set the porkchops on their side to cook the fat.

5) Now add tons of butter and if you want throw in a piece of garlic. I found that using garlic powder on the porkchops would over flavor them, so using a whole garlic while cooking gets a more reduced garlicy flavor. The slight garlicy flavor is optional because if it gets too strong it takes away from the flavor of the meat.

6) I bathe the porkchops religiously, and at this point I'm pretty much eyeballing it. Typically it takes about 10 minutes total-ish for a 2inch porkchop but depending the meat it may vary. At this point its like painting a picture, how brown do you want to get your outside, etc.. Also make sure you add more pepper mid-way through before flipping the sides again.

7) Depending on your meat, sometimes the touch test is inaccurate. So basically if you know/feel your meat is naturally more tender especially after resting in salt, it's going to feel like a medium well steak when it's starting to overcook. Biggest issue is cooking it too firm, or to the point it's completely white. You absolutely have to cook it to a medium-well, so when you first take it off the pan if you cut into it it'll be slightly pink.

8) Wrap in tin foil and let it rest for about same amount of time you spent cooking it. It magically cooks it's self and 9/10 times appears completely cooked after resting a bit especially if you got it to the perfect temp before taking off the pan. (I don't have a meat stick so idk)


That's what I do to make the best porkchops. Instead of salting them for 2-3 hours you can also marinate them although typically when you do that you have to cook at a lower temp because the sugars will caramelize creating a burnt crust. (maybe some people like that idk) Not sure if this is right section to post this but I wanted to post this somewhere on the internet.
 
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Try S+P the desired amount then rack in the fridge 24hr. They will either be skinned over or reasonably dry after this time, if still wet I will fan dry. For a different flavor profile you rack them at room for an hour, then fan dry. They will brown much better dry, will not spatter much and will not stick even with a half-hazard seasoning of the pan.

I like using a big [but not tall] heavy bottomed pot for searing, never a spatter problem that way.
 
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I miss being able to spend time and love on my food like you do.

Nowadays, I'm just too lazy to do anything with my meats but to throw them in a water bath for sous vide.
 
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Bone in rib chop or center cut loin? I prefer rib chops. I brine in a sugar/salt water solution for an hour, pat dry, season with salt and fresh ground pepper then throw them on a screaming grill. I sear both sides then move them to indirect heat until they reach 145 deg F- very important because anything higher means dried out and tough. It's OK and proper for pork to be a little pink in the center.

You should be able to do much the same in a pan but it's going to look like you are burning the house down during the sear.
 
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Just a couple observations.

- You shouldn't leave your chops out at room temperature for 2-3 hours. When doing a dry brine, salt the chops and then return them to the fridge uncovered for however long you want them to brine.

- When you are done cooking your chops, wrapping them in tinfoil as they rest risks causing the chops to overcook to a temperature that you don't want. Simply place the chops on a rack or a plate uncovered and let them sit for 5-10 minutes depending on the thickness of the chop.

Other than that, I think your method is fine.

Have you tried cooking the chops on a grill?
 
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Why not? That amount of salt would give you all the protection from anything bad.
Perhaps, but, you know as well as I that its not fool proof and we would be gigged by any health inspector if they walked in and saw raw, salted pork sitting out for several hours. Leaving meat out under any circumstances is a bad habit to get into regardless of whether you are a pro or a home cook. :)
 
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I get pretty good deals on bone in chops lately, so have been having tnem
often. Takes 5 mins in a pan. Light coating of oil, sear both sides, rdduce heat to
medium, add some red or white wine, saute covered 4 minutes, flip, 1 minute more.
Remove to rest a bit, (its been through a LOT after all!) add more wine to the pan,
maybe a litte worsterchester sauce etc, reduce to make a fine pan sauce.
Devour.
 
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All right this is not off-topic really, I just want to know the proper names for the cut you use for chops. I always thought it was called the "saddle", but had a cook tell me "bone-in loin." Are both right?
 
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You should be able to do much the same in a pan but it's going to look like you are burning the house down during the sear.

With glass top stove as the OP has and a goodly flat-bottomed pan the heat is very even and you can arrange 2 or 3 chops, maybe even 4, so there is good coverage to minimize smoking. Any half decent exhaust fan can handle it pretty well. One advantage anyways for a glass top.
 
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I use the exact method and it’s great!! Except I also add thyme to the salt and let it brine in the refrigerator. I also add sage or other herbs to the butter in the pan if possible. And a little lemon juice! And medium well is over cooked for me. Other wise spot on enjoy!!
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
All right this is not off-topic really, I just want to know the proper names for the cut you use for chops. I always thought it was called the "saddle", but had a cook tell me "bone-in loin." Are both right?

Theoretically speaking, pork doesn't have a saddle, only lamb and bunny do. People that use the word saddle mostly just want to sound fancy.

The correct cut is called the loin. There's a boneless loin, but no bone-in loin.
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2017
Just a couple observations.

- You shouldn't leave your chops out at room temperature for 2-3 hours. When doing a dry brine, salt the chops and then return them to the fridge uncovered for however long you want them to brine.

- When you are done cooking your chops, wrapping them in tinfoil as they rest risks causing the chops to overcook to a temperature that you don't want. Simply place the chops on a rack or a plate uncovered and let them sit for 5-10 minutes depending on the thickness of the chop.

Other than that, I think your method is fine.

Have you tried cooking the chops on a grill?

I currently live in an Apartment and my fridge actually leaks which is why I don't set open containers or foods in there. The whole tinfoil thing is intentional I want it to cook more, although if I cook my chops a bit too firm or cooked then I won't put them in tin foil. Also what's wrong with letting my chops sit out at room temp for 2-3 hours? I don't think I've gotten any bowel movement issues from it.
 
63
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Joined Jun 27, 2017
I use the exact method and it’s great!! Except I also add thyme to the salt and let it brine in the refrigerator. I also add sage or other herbs to the butter in the pan if possible. And a little lemon juice! And medium well is over cooked for me. Other wise spot on enjoy!!

I have no idea what thyme, or sage tastes like or how it'll impact the flavor. I guess I'll have to add this into my trial and error process, I'll figure out how it impacts the flavor overtime. I seen youtube videos of people throwing thyme and other weird stuff into the pan, personally I've never used or even tasted thyme or sage to my knowledge.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
I currently live in an Apartment and my fridge actually leaks which is why I don't set open containers or foods in there. The whole tinfoil thing is intentional I want it to cook more, although if I cook my chops a bit too firm or cooked then I won't put them in tin foil. Also what's wrong with letting my chops sit out at room temp for 2-3 hours? I don't think I've gotten any bowel movement issues from it.
Food safety and proper handling of meat is not measured or determined by the absence of issues. Its determined by how food is handled.

If you played Russian Roulette and nothing happened when you pulled the trigger, does that mean the game is safe?

If you are willing to leave salted chops out on the counter at room temp for several hours, what's to stop you from cutting corners with poultry or seafood or dairy products?

Bad habits beget other bad habits and bad habits are where potential health risks begin.

So, to answer your question about what's wrong with leaving the chops out at room temp, they are being left to set in the temperature danger zone. Bacteria thrive at room temperature. Granted, the salt on the chops will slow down bacteria growth. However, that is not fool proof. Bacteria can and will continue to grow in a saline environment. Otherwise, places like the oceans and salt water pools would be free of bacteria.

Good luck. :)
 
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Right, safe food handling processes are based on the theory of treating everything like it's contaminated so when you eventually do come across a piece that's actually contaminated, you're safe. Not getting sick when you don't follow them is good luck, not good practice.

But yes, you most certainly can fry a pork chop. You can even find fried pork chops on the menu at restaurants here in the South. A nice Southern cream gravy isn't an unwelcome complement, either.
 
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