Its hard working with new grads from culinary school

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by dougbeutler, Nov 12, 2016.

  1. dougbeutler

    dougbeutler

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    Argggg.what the hell might have to start drinking again
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    ive been on both sides of this situation, its rough, and drinking helps lol 
     
  3. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    Im used to apprentices, but I find it to be a good thing. 

    Yes, they cause a lot of extra work, but also a lot of joy. Being able to shape these people into professionals is a good thing. It might be the beginning of a long friendship. Of course separating private and professional life at work, but treat the with the respect they make themselves worthy of, and verbally cut their head off when they deserve it.

    During the last 7 years after finishing my own apprenticeship Ive just had one I gave up, and she was a lost case from the beginning. With the other ones they have been through tears, shame, anger, but mostly good times. Its just good for them to feel that the world is hard, as long as they are able to bounce back and see that a little bit of hardship is nothing but a challenge.
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    What irks me is when the kid spends his parents hard earned money to go the culinary school, and the kid sleeps through most of it, graduates, and is as ignorant as all beegesus.

    I may as well take any Joe off the street, cause this kid is dumber than a box of rocks...,

    Sorry... bad memory from years gone by
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016
  5. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    You might be right. My way is to treat them like incompetent until they have proven worthy of anything else. With this comes the lesson and the walkthrough.
    And if one is not able to carry out a task, you just don't get the task. The shame of not being given the certain task is often enough drive to make it happen the next time.
    They need to have the inner drive. How I get that out is individual. Sometimes it is enough to be said unworthy of something, to give them the drive. Just to show they are worthy of your trust and respect.
    It's all a mindgame.
     
  6. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    I have a much easier time molding a general worker rather than a grad. They think they know everything and when I tell them to do it differently, show them how to do it more efficiently, etc there is always push back. The ones I have hired have huge egos and literally nothing to back it up. Rarely do I get a Yes Chef and follow through.
     
  7. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Well, how many people would be signing up for a $25K program that guarantees a $10 job. These schools don't tell anyone the reality of real life and working in kitchens. It's all being called "CHEF" for two years that will make the grad feel like the money was well spent. The only problem is they think they can cook when they get out. If I have a Grad, All I want from them is knife skills. Don't tell me what you did in school, just listen and learn what we do here. 
     
  8. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    I might have brought oranges into this discussion about apples.

    Im used to apprentices, and they come in not knowing much. I still love them. 
     
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I dunno...

    Usually, I get a student from a c.c. for two weeks twice a year, this is the last hurdle for them before graduating.

    Now, I dont cook anymore, its exclusively chocolate and confectionary, and the students are pastry and baking, not cooks. Its also a very small kitchen, and its one on one with the student all the time.

    Most of my experiences with the students have been pretty positive. I show them what I want, I demo, I get them to demo back, I watch, then they continue.

    Out of about twenty, I had only one stinker.
     
  10. girlcook

    girlcook

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    I  only have 6 years experience in kitchens and no culinary school but I love love cooking! Im always asking questions and trying to learn and plate one new dish a week or day . I have had "chefs" that went to school ask me how to make Mexican rice. Then when they make it they take all the credit. lol huh?egos. I have NO ego just pride in my work. I am a retired Police Officer too so it helps to show respect for the chefs and to listen and learn. I am used to a military type work environment sometimes it works against me because some kitchens are  just a bunch of derelicts!! haha you know what I mean... 
     
  11. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    They used to drive me crazy. Now I just find them adorable!
     
  12. luis de vence

    luis de vence

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    I learn everything I put in practice in my kitchen from a derelict. I loved being his apprentice. Heck, I'd go back and be his apprentice if i could. Not a lot of kids these days willing to learn and take orders. Like it was stated a few posts back, they feel entitled to everything after dropping a sum of money on school. I knew from the start that school meant only a fraction of what it was to be a cook and not even a decimal of what it meant to be a real chef. 

    Best thing I can say, from the perspective of being a recent apprentice myself is "be willing to let us make a mistake at first, don't smother, but also don't ignore. We really want to learn, and we want to make you proud. Help us retake your first steps, we don't want to let you down."
     
  13. hookedcook

    hookedcook

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    Worked a year at a high end ski lodge in Colorado    (no names, being professional??)    Most all of my line cooks  and the 2 other high end restaurants on the mountain were culinary externs.  Most are great and you can mold them and teach them because they admit they know nothing.  Then you have the older/old guys who think they know everything and don't take instructions.  BECAUSE THEY HAVE BEEN COOKING FOR 30 YEARS!  NEWS FLASH ASSHOLE, DENNYS, CHILIS, OR TGI FRIDAYS DOESN'T COUNT.  The only extern I ever fired was over 40 years old.  I even caught some young and dumb extern couple chugging  beers in the walk in.  Ripped the beer away from them, kept my cool and said "after shifts over we are going to have a serious talk".  They were both like 21 years old, stared them down all shift and wouldn't look at me.  Knew that I was going to fire them both.  So in to the office after the shift.  Shes about to cry.  ME,  " I won't lie to you and will never deny, I've had a beer or 2 at work and was much better at hiding it than them.  But you guys are just fucking stupid,  you can't even cook sober much less after a beer.  If you guys could actually do your job I'll buy you a beer.  Anyways externs are like kids, just have to point them in the right direction.  Yell at them a bit, smack them or throw a hot sauté pan at them when no ones looking.  Always nice though 10 years later when those little punks are running high end restaurants and making their way in the world
     
  14. jimyra

    jimyra

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    High end work and gutter vocabulary
     
  15. hookedcook

    hookedcook

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    Gutter meaning curse words or just bad vocabulary??  Have a Culinary degree not English Literature.  Sorry if you got offended.  If I put a swear jar in every kitchen I have worked in I would be a billionaire.  Not saying its a good thing.  Times are changing and now you have to be aware of peoples "feelings and sensitivity".  Learned 10 years ago wasn't cut out for the corporate restaurant/hotel thing.  Never again, but that's just me.  Once again sorry if the cursing or the bad grammar that bothered you.  I usually only post here when I'm on Vacation bored/ Drunk/ or have a serious Culinary question.    Last night was 2 or the 3.  Guess which ones? When I'm cooking 14 hour days the last thing I want to do when I come home is go online and think/discuss anything about food!  One a positive note taking 4 months vacation, went kiteboarding today in Paracas, Peru.  Ran into a flock of Flamingos!  Who know there were Flamingos in South Peru??  Today was a good day.