Italian recipe

84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
F6C2EE80-426E-4481-BF96-01E5D870ED05.jpeg F6C2EE80-426E-4481-BF96-01E5D870ED05.jpeg Does anyone have recipe for Ansogno bread? We buy it on Arthur Ave in the Bronx ,NY. It is sold in the shape of a ring filled Will some chopped prosciutto. So Yummy would love to make at home.
 
1,197
738
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Are you sure you're getting the name right? "Ansogno" is not a word that exists in the Italian language. There's "un sogno" which translates as "a dream."

At any rate, what you are showing in your pictures is not uncommon or hard to make. Its simply Italian bread dough with prosciutto mixed in to the dough and twisted into a ring. Just make the Italian bread dough. Any good recipe will do.....flour, water, salt, yeast etc.....add some prosciutto to it after its gone through the necessary number of proofings (risings), form into rings and bake.

Make sure you add the prosciutto after the last rising. You don't want the prosciutto sitting around at room temp in the dough while it rises.

Good luck.
 
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
Are you sure you're getting the name right? "Ansogno" is not a word that exists in the Italian language. There's "un sogno" which translates as "a dream."

At any rate, what you are showing in your pictures is not uncommon or hard to make. Its simply Italian bread dough with prosciutto mixed in to the dough and twisted into a ring. Just make the Italian bread dough. Any good recipe will do.....flour, water, salt, yeast etc.....add some prosciutto to it after its gone through the necessary number of proofings (risings), form into rings and bake.

Make sure you add the prosciutto after the last rising. You don't want the prosciutto sitting around at room temp in the dough while it rises.

Good luck.
Thanks for the response. The bakery I bought this from calls it ansogno bread (Addeo Bakery) probably dialect of some sort.
 
1,197
738
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Thanks for the response. The bakery I bought this from calls it ansogno bread (Addeo Bakery) probably dialect of some sort.
Lol...I think the dialect is Bronxonian. :) Its like how "fagiolo" (bean) became "fazoole" as in "pasta fazool".
 
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
Lol...I think the dialect is Bronxonian. :) Its like how "fagiolo" (bean) became "fazoole" as in "pasta fazool".
Yes exactly....I knew there wasn't such word...but thought what am I missing something. How they destroy these words I just don't know. Have a great day!
 
1
0
Joined Nov 28, 2020
Yes exactly....I knew there wasn't such word...but thought what am I missing something. How they destroy these words I just don't know. Have a great day!
@sgsvirgil
Lol...I think the dialect is Bronxonian. :) Its like how "fagiolo" (bean) became "fazoole" as in "pasta fazool".
Virgil, maybe you should have listened to Dante, who was aware of the other languages of Italy. 'Fazool' is not a bastardization of "fagiolo" but rather, an anglicized spelling to approximate the Neopolitan 'fasula' or Sicilian 'fasolu' where 's' between vowels gets pronounced like a 'z.' These languages also often have final vowel deletion, so if you'd chatted with any immigrants from Southern Italy in the Bronx (there are still many), you might have learned how 'they' speak and how those destroying language are the people who seek to erode the legitimacy of Italian-American pronunciations rooted in very real words from other languages (some lost in time, especially with the influence of Standard Italian on dialects, which continue to be stigmatized even in Italy).

I'm sure you meant no harm, but your comment is highly offensive to Italian-Americans like me who see the constant erasure of our culture.

As for the lard bread question, @sidediva, I'd recommend using a recipe that incorporates lard right into the dough. You can render your own using pork belly and save the ciccioli (also known as cigole some places) to add with the black pepper--a key ingredient. There are lots of recipes circulating on TheFreshLoaf and elsewhere.
 
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
Virgil....What comment is highly offensive!? I am Italian and did not make any kind of offensive comment and wouldn't. I am very aware of accents since my whole family came from Italy. When I said they destroyed a word using ansogno I was referring to the bakery that sells this bread. You must be thinking of someone else so address your annoyance to them. I lived in the Bronx as a youngster so I am aware of some of the slang expressions/or dialect used but had never heard the word ansongno so was trying to find out if anyone was aware of perhaps a dialect word I was not aware of. Don't need a lesson in language deconstruction. Carry on....
 
1,197
738
Joined Mar 1, 2017
@sgsvirgil

Virgil, maybe you should have listened to Dante, who was aware of the other languages of Italy. 'Fazool' is not a bastardization of "fagiolo" but rather, an anglicized spelling to approximate the Neopolitan 'fasula' or Sicilian 'fasolu' where 's' between vowels gets pronounced like a 'z.' These languages also often have final vowel deletion, so if you'd chatted with any immigrants from Southern Italy in the Bronx (there are still many), you might have learned how 'they' speak and how those destroying language are the people who seek to erode the legitimacy of Italian-American pronunciations rooted in very real words from other languages (some lost in time, especially with the influence of Standard Italian on dialects, which continue to be stigmatized even in Italy).

I'm sure you meant no harm, but your comment is highly offensive to Italian-Americans like me who see the constant erasure of our culture.

As for the lard bread question, @sidediva, I'd recommend using a recipe that incorporates lard right into the dough. You can render your own using pork belly and save the ciccioli (also known as cigole some places) to add with the black pepper--a key ingredient. There are lots of recipes circulating on TheFreshLoaf and elsewhere.

Maybe you should learn some manners?

FYI: I'm a native Italian speaker and I would love to watch what happens if you used the word "fasolu" in Sicily or "fasula" in Naples. You realize those are not polite words, right? Probably not. Please allow to educate you.

The the words "fasolu" or "fasula" were originally used to describe a laborer or someone who worked with beans; a farmer, picker, field hand, a person in a canning factory etc. Over time, the word's meaning was expanded to include a generic reference to anyone who worked with their hands but, didn't have a specific skill such as a general laborer. As I am sure you are aware, an adult male in Italy before WWII who didn't have a trade or know a skill were considered lowly, to put it politely. Over time, these words took on a derogatory meaning in reference to those who didn't have a skill or trade similar to how the word "beaner" is offensive to people of Hispanic Heritage.

Since you're new here, please allow me to give you a piece of friendly advice. This is a forum comprised of many members who have literally decades of experience in all manner of subjects. We prefer to share our knowledge and experiences with each other in a constructive, respectful and meaningful manner. If this painfully simple practice is beyond your capability or willingness, please say so now and I will be more than happy to block you and I am sure others will as well. However, if you are willing to make an effort to embrace this simple request then, welcome aboard. I'm sure you will profit tremendously from your time here. :)

Cheers!
 
1,197
738
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Virgil....What comment is highly offensive!? I am Italian and did not make any kind of offensive comment and wouldn't. I am very aware of accents since my whole family came from Italy. When I said they destroyed a word using ansogno I was referring to the bakery that sells this bread. You must be thinking of someone else so address your annoyance to them. I lived in the Bronx as a youngster so I am aware of some of the slang expressions/or dialect used but had never heard the word ansongno so was trying to find out if anyone was aware of perhaps a dialect word I was not aware of. Don't need a lesson in language deconstruction. Carry on....
I think you meant to direct your comment to @food_talk ? I didn't find anything you said to be offensive whatsoever. :)
 
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
I think you meant to direct your comment to @food_talk ? I didn't find anything you said to be offensive whatsoever. :)
I'm sorry Yes this was meant for Food Talk...thanks
@sgsvirgil

Virgil, maybe you should have listened to Dante, who was aware of the other languages of Italy. 'Fazool' is not a bastardization of "fagiolo" but rather, an anglicized spelling to approximate the Neopolitan 'fasula' or Sicilian 'fasolu' where 's' between vowels gets pronounced like a 'z.' These languages also often have final vowel deletion, so if you'd chatted with any immigrants from Southern Italy in the Bronx (there are still many), you might have learned how 'they' speak and how those destroying language are the people who seek to erode the legitimacy of Italian-American pronunciations rooted in very real words from other languages (some lost in time, especially with the influence of Standard Italian on dialects, which continue to be stigmatized even in Italy).

I'm sure you meant no harm, but your comment is highly offensive to Italian-Americans like me who see the constant erasure of our culture.

As for the lard bread question, @sidediva, I'd recommend using a recipe that incorporates lard right into the dough. You can render your own using pork belly and save the ciccioli (also known as cigole some places) to add with the black pepper--a key ingredient. There are lots of recipes circulating on TheFreshLoaf and elsewhere.
 
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
Maybe you should learn some manners?

FYI: I'm a native Italian speaker and I would love to watch what happens if you used the word "fasolu" in Sicily or "fasula" in Naples. You realize those are not polite words, right? Probably not. Please allow to educate you.

The the words "fasolu" or "fasula" were originally used to describe a laborer or someone who worked with beans; a farmer, picker, field hand, a person in a canning factory etc. Over time, the word's meaning was expanded to include a generic reference to anyone who worked with their hands but, didn't have a specific skill such as a general laborer. As I am sure you are aware, an adult male in Italy before WWII who didn't have a trade or know a skill were considered lowly, to put it politely. Over time, these words took on a derogatory meaning in reference to those who didn't have a skill or trade similar to how the word "beaner" is offensive to people of Hispanic Heritage.

Since you're new here, please allow me to give you a piece of friendly advice. This is a forum comprised of many members who have literally decades of experience in all manner of subjects. We prefer to share our knowledge and experiences with each other in a constructive, respectful and meaningful manner. If this painfully simple practice is beyond your capability or willingness, please say so now and I will be more than happy to block you and I am sure others will as well. However, if you are willing to make an effort to embrace this simple request then, welcome aboard. I'm sure you will profit tremendously from your time here. :)

Cheers.
 
Last edited:
84
14
Joined Mar 31, 2013
@sgsvirgil

Virgil, maybe you should have listened to Dante, who was aware of the other languages of Italy. 'Fazool' is not a bastardization of "fagiolo" but rather, an anglicized spelling to approximate the Neopolitan 'fasula' or Sicilian 'fasolu' where 's' between vowels gets pronounced like a 'z.' These languages also often have final vowel deletion, so if you'd chatted with any immigrants from Southern Italy in the Bronx (there are still many), you might have learned how 'they' speak and how those destroying language are the people who seek to erode the legitimacy of Italian-American pronunciations rooted in very real words from other languages (some lost in time, especially with the influence of Standard Italian on dialects, which continue to be stigmatized even in Italy).

I'm sure you meant no harm, but your comment is highly offensive to Italian-Americans like me who see the constant erasure of our culture.

As for the lard bread question, @sidediva, I'd recommend using a recipe that incorporates lard right into the dough. You can render your own using pork belly and save the ciccioli (also known as cigole some places) to add with the black pepper--a key ingredient. There are lots of recipes circulating on TheFreshLoaf and elsewhere.
What comment is highly offensive!? I am Italian and did not make any kind of offensive comment and wouldn't. I am very aware of accents since my whole family came from Italy. When I said they destroyed a word using ansogno I was referring to the bakery that sells this bread. You must be thinking of someone else so address your annoyance to them. I lived in the Bronx as a youngster so I am aware of some of the slang expressions/or dialects used but had never heard the word ansongno so was trying to find out if anyone was aware of perhaps a dialect word I was not aware of. Don't need a lesson in language deconstruction. Carry on....I don't need a lecture from you, I am very comfortable with my Italian heritage and language. I am insulted by your comment.

Quote Reply
Report Edit
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom