It Needs a New Name? Shape?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by foodnfoto, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    I need marketing advice from anyone who would like to give it.

    I make these delicious little veggie and cheese pies to sell at the farmers' market. They're filled with cubed potatoes, vegetables herbs, and cheese. They're formed in a "rustic" shape- piles of the filling in the center of a small round of dough, then the extra dough is folded up the sides, pleated and baked until crisp. You can see the fillings in the middle. They're about 5 inches in diameter and 2 inches high-good for a quick lunch.  I'll post a picture after I make this week's batch. 

    The fillings are: leek- potato-thyme-goat cheese, broccoli-mushroom-cheddar, butternut-kale-w/walnut pesto, bell pepper-onion-chipotle jack, plus a few others. They're kind of like little free form quiches only without the egg custard.

    We call them "Rustic Vegetable Tarts" People at one small market love them, but in the larger markets customers seem kind of mystified by them and don't buy them. We sample about 20% of the total batch.

    The big questions are:

    Should I call them something else? or make them in a different shape? or both?

    I've considered shaping them like empanadas and maybe cutting out a shape from the top crust or putting them in little bake-able paper pans. 

    Should I call them something else? Veggie Pot Pies? Turnovers?

    Open to ideas--help me brainstorm this one, Folks.

    Thanks a million
     
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    That was my first thought as I first started to read your post.  In my area, the farmer’s markets do the same thing.  Up here in the country at the small stands, a rustic half moon shape would sell as a hand-held four-bite pot pie.  Whereas down in the city you can make the fancier stuff in the bake-able papers and it’ll work
     
  3. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Find a historical connection to attach a name that links them to the past or place of the market.

    Use different ethnic terms to describe the food which corresponds to your most likely customers or play off your own heritage. 

    I believe that the common culinary term used to describe them would be 'Hand Pies' either sweet or savoury.
     
  4. durangojo

    durangojo

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    my chime foodnfoto,

    i think your rustic tarts are just perfect as rustic tarts.....perhaps a smaller size is all that's needed....a 4" instead of 5". there is so much to see, eat, sample, munch and nibble at a farmer's market that a 5" tart may be too big and filling for a little knosh.

    perhaps people don't buy them to eat at home later because it doesn't fit into any food category...they don't know what to do with it...is it an app? a light lunch? serve with soup for dinner?  go figure the over thinking

    as far as take and bake, i'm divided...people tend to screw that sort of thing up, then come back to you complaining how bad it was, when they were the one who overbaked it, underbaked it or god forbid put it in the nuker...

    hope this helps,

    joey
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Maybe try calling them galettes.
     
  6. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    What you are describing sounds just like a Cornish Pasty:


    If that is exactly what you are making, calling it by its name is not necessarily going to help it sell.  Allusions to "King Aurthur's Empinada" or "Tin Miner's Hot Pocket" wouldn't help because hardly anyone knows what Cornwall is. I think Durangojo has put it right that the name is probably fine and a smaller size would help. 

    I have found what you name a dish is Paramount as to weather people will like it or not;  If I make a 100% classic French dish and tell people that it is French only the hungry guys want it, the exact same dish renamed "New Orleans ____ " or  "Louisiana Bayou _____"  will sell and people love it.  -go figure.  So, I'd ask myself what names are people already familiar with there - like hot-pocket or empinada - everybody knows what that is.  And what's the theme of the "party" - like local, organic, home-made, old fashioned, garden, or whatever.  Then what words jive with the ingredients - Autumn, Forest, Irish, Shepperd's, Savory, Roasted, Harvest, gardener's, Melt.... Etc Etc... Kind of build up the name like that, almost like writing a 3 word poem that fits the moment of the point of sell.   LOL.

    -CDF
     
  7. coup-de-feu

    coup-de-feu

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    Here is something similar I make from time to time:  (if I've understood your description correctly)


    These are full of fruit, sometimes I fill them with fruit and wine and zest.  I didn't know what to call them either and settled on "piglet pies".  Piglet because they are small and you are meant to have more than one.  The name seemed to work...
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Vege and cheese BONBONAIRS
     
  9. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    I think some might be misunderstanding me. Here is what they kind of look like-


    only they're filled with veggies and cheese.

    I'm making asparagus, scallion and chevre tarts for this weekend.

    Will post a pic.

    BTW, we sell them for about $6.00 each-with a bowl of soup or salad makes a perfect lunch or dinner.

    What do you think?

    Call them a different name? Make in a different shape?
     
  10. durangojo

    durangojo

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    coup de feu,

    my thinking is that they are something more along these lines....

      no i did not make these......joey
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2012
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Correct me if i'm wrong but  technically they are  'open face pies '.  People are funny when it comes to names. You don't want to give it a name and then they ask you "what is that ?" but telling them you have sweet or savory pies is fine in my eyes.

    If you were to close the pastry then you would be able to market the name a little easier. Maybe easier for transporting also.

    Just a thought.

    Petals.
     
  12. durangojo

    durangojo

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    sorry foodnfoto...i didn't mean to step on any toes here...think we were just posting at the same time...it took me longer cuz i was TRYING to download photos.....fwiw, i still think you should go with the same name, and shape...maybe add roasted in the name, as in 'roasted vegetable rustic tart', or simply 'roasted vegetable tart'...maybe it's the word 'rustic' that confuses folks somehow.  further, i think seeing the filling inside the free form dough is alot of the appeal.....again, maybe just a smaller size will do the trick.....seems worth a try...and make it 5 bucks....

    joey
     
  13. berndy

    berndy

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    What Durangojo is showing us used to be called 'rustic pies'
     
  14. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    The technical term for these free-form, "rustic" pies is "galette."  Not all galettes are open, not all galettes are pie -- some are cakes some are filled crepes.   

    Chefs Petals and Joey know that but are being coy.

    BDL
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I don't care for the word "rustic" in food either.  I don't think it's descriptive of anything really, it's just a filler word that's supposed to conjure up memories or nostalgia?  Anyway, a pie is a pie is a pie, call them a pie and add a description of fillings.  Call them single-serving pies, or pot pies, or open faced pies, or hand held pies.  Personally I'd call it one of those and make a list of the different types written nicely on a board hanging over the table like this:

    Open Faced Pies   $6

    Leek, Potato & Goat Cheese

    Broccoli Mushroom Cheddar

    Butternut kale & walnut pesto

    Bell pepper, onion, chipotle jack

    Natural Ingredients – Handmade dough

    When I walk around at the farmer's market I pay attention to signs, cleanliness, attention to detail and traffic.  Oh and sorry but I always look for savoury pies with meat in them, got any with proscuitto and cheese or chicken pot? 
     
  16. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    ... and are we talking NYC union square farmers market?  I'll come by myself and inspect those pies /img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif
     
  17. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    I'd buy these!

    Maybe a little smaller though, just a couple of bites

    that way I can sample other things and not get too full
     
  18. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    Durango--

    No hurting toes here at all. Those are really nice pics. Mine are just smaller-single serving pies.

    Unfortunately, we do not do Union Square, KouKou, but we do participate in the Park Slope market on 4th St, by 5th Avenue at PS 51.

    Re: adding meat, we find it difficult to sell items that we cannot display. So putting meat in them relegates them to hiding in the cooler. 

    Also due to the sourcing requirements of the market, local meat is too cost prohibitive, and most of our customers are vegetarian anyway. I even get some who show interest, but balk when they hear there is cheese in them. Go figure. 

    Somehow-"galette" and "coup de feu" do not work for me-sounds too highfalutin for a farmers market.

    So what do you think about calling them "Rustic Veggie Pies?" My hunch is that using "rustic" is useful because it differentiates them from the other pie makers at the market that make traditional sweet double crust pies. 

    I love the association that "Pot Pie" gives, but I'm afraid it might confuse people since most think of pot pies as stuff on the bottom and pastry on top.

    ???
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2012
  19. berndy

    berndy

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    HAND PIES  should do fine then ???
     
  20. durangojo

    durangojo

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    foodnfoto,

     i think that you are a smart enough cookie to know to trust your hunches...( my soulvoice also says 'rustic' though)

    sorry for any confusion about coup de feu..it was not a new food name. i was addressing the picture chef (coup de feu) posted of his lovely fruit turnovers and meat empanadas

    joey
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012