Isomalt Caramelize!

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by cakerookie, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Just a curious question. But at what point does Isomalt began to caramelize?
    I know granulated sugar starts at 320F just curious about Isomalt. Can it be took to extremes like 380F with out turning into a glob of unuseable gook. 380 just sounds ridiculous in my book. I know it is pure sugar but it does have a caramelization point right? Advice anyone.
     
  2. sucrechef

    sucrechef

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    Yes it does have a caramelization point, but I've never checked to see what the temp is. Most people don't use isomalt for this purpose, sugar works better.
     
  3. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    sucrechef
    Do you have a site that I might be able to go to find out. This is just curosity on my part no reason for it.
     
  4. chrose

    chrose

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Hey Ch. Have any ideas? Have not heard from you and Pan a lot lately miss chatting with you. Had a lot of interesting chats with you guys. I enjoyed it. So what do you think about this Isomalt deal?
     
  6. chrose

    chrose

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    Now that's odd :confused: I sent a PM to you yesterday or so I thought. Hmm I wonder what happened. Oh well, anyhoo, sorry to disagree with SC but the fact of the matter is you can't caramelize Isomalt chemically it just doesn't work that way. Isomalt is a Polyol (a sugar alcohol) while it shares a commonality with sucrose in it's texture and appearance and it is based on sucrose, that's where the similarity ends. It will not cook the same, taste the same or digest the same as regular sugar. Anytime you have a candy or item made with Isomalt that is caramelized, it was done with flavorings. So don't waste your time trying to brown it, t'aint gonna happen.
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    ditto CH. I just deleted. and you would not want to spend that kind of money for caramel.
    We just ordered in isomalt. Erica, who did a couple of pieces at school 2 yrs. ago is familiar with isomalt. I guess she will show the old dog some new tricks. I had a difficult time paying the price though :eek:
    I'm thinking of doing a gingerbread type village for our front window out of poured,cast and pulled sugar. I have happened upon a plastics place that does all sorts of fabrication in acrylic,lexan etc. They said the will build me a UV display box for cheap. They just built me 2 sugar warming surrounds out of 5/8" acrylic for 35 bucks. It's unbelievable. They have never had a walk-in before and drop everything when I arrive so they can show me their products and skills. Course I'm only catching maybe 6 out of 10 words :D
    BTW CR T.acid is really cheap at Uster.
    ps CR I usuallywon't post if I find info that disagrees with another post. Sure is nice to have CH around, eh
     
  8. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    You bet Pan. Can always count on good ol CH to come through eh. Well Ch, let me ask this question of you. If it will not caramelize then at what temp would you cook it to? And will it stay clear even at high temps? All this sugar chemistry is getting confusing guys, its easier just to boil it and pull it or pour it. But hey if you are a chef you have to understand your ingredients and how they interact with other ingredients. I am no chef but thats the way I see it.Hey CH, I am taking notes on your lectures here they are pretty good, ever thought about teaching?
     
  9. chrose

    chrose

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    You're too kind. I thought about teaching long ago and it still crosses my mind, but I am no Cape Chef!
    I still prefer sugar and will deal with the hydroscopic issues of the sugar (pain though it might be!) I used Isomalt when it first came out and personally I did not care for it. I felt that it help temp too long and worked hotter than sugar, it was also harder to pull than sugar. Maybe it's improved since then, but I don't want to bother finding out.
    Now rather than go the scientific route to answer your question, I am going straight to the horses mouth and let Albert Uster answer some use questions about Venuance Isomalt from his website.
    Take four parts Venuance Crystals to one part water. Bring to a boil, stirring with a whisk. Clean pan sides with water. Continue boiling to 170ºC. Cool the pan in cold water.

    For Venuance Cages:
    Wait until the mass cools to a honey-like consistency. Dip the prongs of a fork into the mass. Lift high out of the pan and quickly spin the threads of Venuance back and forth. Begin with the circumference of the ladle, then horizontally and vertically over the ladle. Remove the excess threads that are hanging below the edge of the ladle using scissors. Carefully remove from the ladle.

    For Casting Venuance:
    Color: Powder color dissolved in a little water can be added once the boiling temperature is reached, then shaken under the boiled Venuance Pearls for a marbled effect. Gold and silver dust can also create very attractive marbling effects. Casting: Wait until the mass thickens a little, then pour slowly into the center of the forms used. The forms should be lightly oiled and placed either on aluminum foil or parchment paper. Allow to cool and remove the forms.

    For Spun Venuance:
    Wait until the mass cools to a honey-like consistency. Dip the Sugar Wand into the cooled mass. Lift out of the pan and wait until there is a steady flow. Slowly draw the hand through the strands, pulling and collecting the threads until a ball is formed.


    Hope this helps.
     
  10. foodpump

    foodpump

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    The isomalt we use here, straight out of the box, gets un-cerimoniously dumped into a pan, heated until disolved and either poured onto a sil-pat and worked just like pulled sugar, or cast, same as sugar. No need to check temps, it's done when the crystals dissolve. I like to put my colours in after the foaming stops, same as with the calcium carbonate. Isomalt is crystal clear when cast properly and looks great when combined with almond nougat, or chocolate; and because it's so clear, you can shove a photocopy of a corporte logo or fancy script under it, and pipe out the image with tempered chocolate....
     
  11. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    So it seems that most people do not use it because of the costs, I see. To be honest achieveing a clear look with granulated sugar is very easy I do not have any trouble getting it clear and no impurities in it either. I personally do not think the costs is worth the pain. Sugar in the sugar alcohol family is quite interesting. You guys tell me more. Fascinating stuff. Oh, and CH you are quite welcome. You would be good at teaching though. I am learning quite a bit just from your posts. Hope you don't mind if I print out some of your posts for future reference?
     
  12. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Hey Pan, CH this has nothing to do with Isomalt. But I posted a recipe request in one of the forums and have not gotten an answer yet I hope one of you can help me. Do you or Pan know a recipe for moulding sugar?
     
  13. chrose

    chrose

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    What exactly is "moulding sugar"? What is it that you want to do with it? There might be a different name that we are familiar with.
     
  14. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    I don't know CH. I saw it mentioned in an article by Martin Chiffers on The Pastry Consultancy Forum. He did not mention how to make it, at least if he did I did not notice it. I don't know maybe I was seeing things it happens when you get my age.
     
  15. karmoe

    karmoe

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    Ewald Notter's book says to place 50g tartaric acid into 50g boiling water. I have done this twice and both times it crystalized after cooling. Is this what is supposed to happen and then it is reheated each time you want to use it? Does anyone know?
    thanks
     
  16. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    What exactly is recrystallizing on you? I am asssuming it is your sugar that is recrystallizing on you? Most boiled sugar recipes call for a one to one mixture of tartaric acid. Mixed together and put in a eyedropper bottle.You have to use this stuff carefully. I have never used it. I use cream of tartar. I do not know how much 50 grams is and I sure am not questioning the great Ewald Notters methods. But it sounds to me like the boiling water is the problem. You want it warm but I don't think it has to be boiled. CH if you are lurking you would proably know better than anybody since you are familiar with Ewalds recipes and methods.Help this man out.
     
  17. chrose

    chrose

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    It sounds to me like you perhaps didn't allow the tartaric acid crstals to completely dissolve. You should be using powderized tartaric acid crystals. Allow it to cool in the bottle. It should also be a pipette bottle that's rather small this will also to help inhibit recrystallization. The recipe itself is fine.
     
  18. karmoe

    karmoe

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    I boiled the water for several minutes and added the TA. It dissolved, I let it go for a few minutes and then both times it has recrystalized when cooled. I went ahead and put some in the dropper bottle. When it gets warm it dissolves. I think I will nuke it when needed and then use it. The bottle was clean prior to use. Thanks for you help.
     
  19. pastrymama

    pastrymama

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    Isomalt will carmelize. I use it carmelized often for cages and spun. I just pour it dry into a pan an cook it just like dry sugar over a medium flame. It melts and after a while- 10 to 15 minutes it will begin to color, be careful because it goes from golden to black quickly. It can be poured, spun, or drizzled to make garnishes etc. Another neat thing is you can pour it out and let it cool, then grind it up in a robo coupe until it is like sugar grains. Take a simple stencil like a triangle or long leaf and lay it on a silpat on a sheet pan, spread the ground isomalt in it. Remove the stencil and make as many shapes that you want. Put the pan in the oven at 350 degrees for about 8 to 10 minutes until the grains melt. Take it out and remove the shapes while hot and bend for an interesting garnish. Left over Isomalt can be remelted over and over without crystalizing so there is very little waste.
     
  20. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    OK, I will go along with that if you are putting it into the pan with no water.CH what do you think?