ISO: European vs American butter?

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Anyone know what the difference between European butters and American butters are? (Since European butters are supposed to be better). I am wondering what the ingredient
difference is or how the process by which it is made is different, and if it is possible to make it (a European version) at home.
 
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Some euro butters are aged and can carry a "sour" or "gamie" flavor.
The basic difference is, as with heavy creams, the fat content is higher. In the case of butter, less liquid content and generally, no salt.
Plugra is a euro style butter available in America.
cchiu ~ where are you located?
 
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mbrown, I am located ~ central states, not in a major metropolitan area. (Why do you ask?)

I have seen a european butter actually at the Wal-Mart Super Center and I could look at an international wine center that carries gourmet foods.

I have several recipes for homemade butter with different ingredients and would entertain the thought of making it myself. But the recipes are all varied in their ingredients and process. (I can post them if you like) then you could tell me which is closest.
 
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if you lived in NYC i could give you exact information on where to find the butter. but with mail order and the internet, you should have no problem.


i have never pondered the recipe for butter would be more than beaten cream and salt.
please post the recipes you have.
thanks
 
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Homemade Butter Recipes
--------------------------------
1 c. whipping cream
cold water

Pour room temperature whipping cream into a 4 cup jar
and screw on lid. Shake vigorously until whey separates from
butter, about 10 minutes. Drain. Add cold water to almost
fill jar. Shake vigorously; drain. Serve butter soft or
chill. Makes 1/2 cup.
---------------------------------------------
1 lb. margarine
1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream cheese
1 small evaporated milk

Mix by hand (no blender, no salt).
---------------------------------------------
1 lb. (4 sticks) Blue Bonnet margarine
1 c. corn oil
1 c. buttermilk
1/8 tsp. salt (optional)

Combine all ingredients and mix with electric mixer,
stirring often, until whipped into fluffy butter. Pour into
container with tight lid and refrigerate. Delicious with angel
cornbread or with any meal.
---------------------------------------------
makes 1 Cup

2 c. whipping cream
1/4 c. ice cold water

Mix cream in blender until thick. Add water and contin-
ue mixing until separated. Turn into strainer and hold under
cold running water, kneading to remove as much milky liquid as
possible. Pat dry with paper towels and mold into desired
shape. Chill about 30 minutes.
---------------------------------------------
1 lb. margarine
1 c. buttermilk
1 c. oil

Beat all ingredients together. Keep refrigerated.
---------------------------------------------
1 c. Crisco
1 c. buttermilk
1 lb. margarine

Melt the pound of margarine; add Crisco. Then add
milk. Stir and beat.
---------------------------------------------
1 qt. unsweetened whipping cream, at room temperature
pinch of salt

Using a mixer, blender or food processor, whip cream
until it coagulates, usually 10 minutes. After butter globules
form, put in bowl and press out milk in cheesecloth. Refrigerate.
---------------------------------------------
1/2 c. heavy cream
1 Tbsp. sour cream

Pour sweet cream into jar; add sour cream. Cover jar
tightly and take turns shaking hard. When it is done, lump in
a saucer and press with a spoon to eliminate all water. Add a
little salt and serve.
---------------------------------------------
1 lb. margarine, softened
1 c. (scant) buttermilk
1/2 c. corn oil

Put margarine, buttermilk and oil in mixing bowl and let
come to room temperature. Mix well with electric mixer. Make
almost 2 pounds of butter. Delicious!
---------------------------------------------
1 c. buttermilk
salt to taste
1 lb. Parkay margarine
1/2 c. Crisco oil
coloring (optional)

Beat together. Tastes like homemade butter. Refrigerate.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
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cchiu, you don't need water in your butter recipes. Just heavy cream and salt. When I was a kid growing up in Vermont my parents used to buy raw milk from a local farmer. The cream would float to the top. Mom would save the cream from a week's worth of milk and my brother and I would have to curn it while watching Sat. morning cartoons. Luckily we had an old fashioned glass butter curn so we just had to crank the handle until it formed the butter. Mom would then take it, salt it, drain it, and form it. The homemade butter didn't have a long shelf life but it was the best tasting butter I ever had.

[This message has been edited by Pete (edited January 06, 2000).]
 
2,068
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Pete,

So if I ever attempt it, I should use the following recipe?

qt. unsweetened whipping cream, at room temperature
pinch of salt

Using a mixer, blender or food processor, whip cream until it coagulates, usually 10 minutes. After butter globules form, put in bowl and press out milk in cheesecloth. Refrigerate.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
I wouldn't use a belender or food processor, but a mixer with either a paddle or whisk attachment should work fine. Also wait to add the salt until the very end. This takes some patience. Salt doesn't readily dissolve in fat so add some wait 10 minutes to taste it then add more if neccessary. If you add it all at once until it tastes right in a few minutes you will have very salty butter.
 
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RE: where did I get the recipes? from all over the web. After seeing the variations and not knowing about how to make it, I posted my question here and I've learned a lot!
 
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Have you thought that it might be what the cows actually eat that makes european butter different? In Australia as other parts of the world I'm sure there are certain geagraphical areas where the cows milk is richer and creamier due to the soil, minerals and pasture in the area.....I have a small farm in australia and these factors makes a great difference. When I travelled to Europe I could taste the difference in cheeses and milks etc so a lot of it could be nature defined?
 
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Euro butter has a higher fat content like Plugra (Plu: more, Gra: fat) Euro butter is also cultured like yogurt. Plugra uses an inactive culture in their butter that gives it a slight edge and in my opinion enhances the flavor.
 
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Well, it's been a year and a half and I just wanted to share with everyone that after this post, I've been making homemade butter semi-regularly ever since! You can't beat it. It's delicious and it only takes 10 minutes for me to make!

:p
 
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Joined Apr 24, 2001
When I was in cooking school, my favorite tasting was the butter tasting. I tended to like domestic European-style butter more than the imported stuff. But strangely, I didn't really like the organic butters. Each one tasted very strange to me. More like feed than cream.

Anyway, one of the most my most mortifying moments in the kitchen was when I made butter by mistake. I forgot all about the kitchenaid because something else drowned out the noise. But the pastry chef made me feel better. When he was in the kitchen of Fauchon, one of the few times that Pierre Herme spoke with him was to tell him that his butter was ready. So it happens to the best of us.
 
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Yummmm....plugra is now Keller.
you have a great organic dairy near you....Barb Bookmeyer, wonderful butter.
Great farm.
 
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Kimmie,

Actually, none of the above. Here's what I do. Get a large container of heavy whipping cream. Let it sit out at room temperature overnight or outside for a few hours.

Pour it into the kitchen aid bowl with the flat beater, not the dough hook. Start it on a medium low speed for 2-3 minutes, then turn it up to medium high. As soon as I hear it start to slosh, that means the milk is separating from the butter (instant homemade buttermilk!). So since I don't want is splashing all over the kitchen, I pour as much of the buttermilk out into a container for later use and continue on medium high speed until it's done separating. I again, pour the milk out and then take a spatula and put the butter in a container.

It is SO EASY! And it's such a joy to make.

I don't prefer to add salt but you can. If you do, keep in mind that if you taste it right after you add it, the butter will taste extremely salty. So let it marry for a few hours and it it will mellow out tremendously...

Enjoy!
 
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Awesome and well worth the wait, cchiu!

BTW, I HATE salted butter...Bleurk!

Thanks so much for 2 in one!

:D
 
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Kimmie,



LOL!!! I can't say I've ever seen that in print. That's a good one1

[ June 19, 2001: Message edited by: cchiu ]
 
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