Is this tinned copper ok?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by sirrith, Jul 8, 2014.

  1. sirrith

    sirrith

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    Hi all, first post here and I have a question about tinned copper.  I bought myself a variety of tinned copper canele molds, and the cheapest ones (very cheap for copper), have a tin lining which looks a bit odd to me.  It has virtually no shine to it, and looks almost like frosted glass.  I've attached a photo to show what I mean.  The top most mold is from Dehillerin in Paris, the middle is from De Buyer, and the last is the cheap-o.  Does anyone know if this is normal?  Thanks!

     
  2. chris bruce

    chris bruce

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    It is normal that tin became "dull" just after first use. Don't worry about making the tin shine  if you do you can reduce the life of the tin. It's all good.
     
  3. sirrith

    sirrith

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    Thanks, but none of them have ever been used.  They are brand new.
     
  4. chris bruce

    chris bruce

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    It's just oxidation it's normal no big deal ;)
     
  5. chefross

    chefross

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    You have a great item here. Tin lined copper is great to work with.

    Jus keep an eye on that tin lining though as it can scratch exposing the copper.

    If that happens you can send them out to be re-tinned.
     
  6. sirrith

    sirrith

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    Thanks all for the replies, I'll not worry about it then :)

    Although sadly I managed to overheat 2 of the molds and the tin linings have some tiny bubbles :( 
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    With tin, keep the temps below 450F or so.  Do an online search for the exact max temp.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  8. sirrith

    sirrith

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    Yes, 231.9C, unfortunately it is difficult to keep such exact temperatures with a toaster oven.  I had it set on 150C only, but because it cycles between max and off, the molds got overheated a bit.  Are they still ok to use with small bubbles in the lining? No copper showing through.  Is there anything I should do e.g. scrape off the bubbles, or just leave them there? 
     
  9. chris bruce

    chris bruce

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    Leave them if you damage the tin they will need to be re tinned  
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Leave 'em alone and use as is.
     
  11. sirrith

    sirrith

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    Thank you all very much for the replies, you've all been a great help!
     
  12. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Hi sirrith.  As you have now found out, it is very easy to overheat the (very thin) tin plating on copper ware. After a bubble forms, it will eventually burst, leaving a bare spot on the copper. Small tinned copper items such as you have were never intended to baked with, more for things like mousses, rice puddings, ice cream molds, and the like.  They are suitable for baking in a water bath, like creme caramel (baked caramel custard) though.
     
  13. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Nothing really wrong with bare copper.

    All drinking water are coming from bare copper pipes.

    dcarch
     
  14. grande

    grande

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    Anyone have any insight on retinning? I have a big pot with a couple of scratches in the tin; right now i just use it for big batches of boiled things
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Once melted around 450F, the tin plating is brushed onto the copper surface and I don't know if the latter is heated. 

    I've had my retinning done at Rocky Mountain Retinning in Denver and he'll make your item look way newer than when you first purchased it.
     
    grande likes this.
  16. foodpump

    foodpump

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    This is true.  Then again, acidic fruits and liquids aren't in water pipes.  When cooking with a solid copper pot for confectionary purposes, I know how important it is to clean the oxidized copper surfaces before using the pot again.
     
  17. chefross

    chefross

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    Please be aware that Rocky Mountain Retinning has moved and is no longer in Denver area. He is still in business though.

    I received an email from him about a month ago.
     
  18. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I appears that they are, indeed, moving to a new location still within the Denver area.