Is there an faster way to cool 15 Gal of hot Broth?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by saltandpepper, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. saltandpepper

    saltandpepper

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Hello,

    My chilled blaster broke down and I am having a hard time chilling the broth manually. My employee are working overtime to chill the broth ice bath style. I just want to know if there is a quicker way to chill the broth until I get my chilled blaster up an running again.

    Thank you,
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    4,983
    Likes Received:
    537
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Yup.

    It's called an "ice wand". Basically a long, narrow plastic bottle with fins that you fill with water and freeze.  Put your hot stock in a cold water bath, pop the ice wand in, and within 10m minutes it's pretty cold. You can make do very well with 4 ltr (1 u.s. gall) milk jugs filled with water and frozen too.1
     
  3. jim berman

    jim berman

    Messages:
    1,908
    Likes Received:
    273
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    @foodpump beat me to it!  Here's what you are looking for:

     
  4. maryb

    maryb

    Messages:
    2,501
    Likes Received:
    181
    Exp:
    Semi pro/retired now
    Immersion chiller, can run it through the dishwasher for cleaning.

     
    mckallidon likes this.
  5. saltandpepper

    saltandpepper

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Thank you so much for all the suggestion. The wand works perfectly.
     
  6. teamfat

    teamfat

    Messages:
    4,019
    Likes Received:
    434
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    The copper coil immersion chiller is what we used for cooling down 10 gallons of wort back when I was homebrewing.

    mjb.
     
  7. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Normally, a Health Inspector may not like the idea of putting it in the walk-in freezer, but if you stir the crap out of it in the freezer the entire time that it is in there, it won't do anything bad.  This is not fun, but it gets the job done.  If it is on the freezer floor, it will cool fast because heat will be getting sucked out from all dimension as you mix.  Stir stir stir.  Also, dividing it up into smaller pots to do this is faster in theory, but possibly not practical.  This really is not much different than using an ice wand.  Cooling is still heat transfer, just away from the target and not into.  We often talk like we are transferring cold but we are not.  Good luck.
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    4,983
    Likes Received:
    537
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Wrong.  Absolutely and emphatically wrong.

    When you put hot items in the freezer you create a lot of steam.  The steam goes right to the condensing coil--that box up there in ceiling with the fans on it-- where the steam cools down into water, sticks on the coil and turns to ice very quickly.  Now the coil is plugged with ice, the fans can't circulate the cold air properly, and as a result, the temperature in your freezer goes up (gets warmer).  After a while the compressor overheats and shuts down. 

    If you're lucky the next defrost cycle can melt the ice on the coil and everything goes back to normal. if you're not, you'll have a warm freezer in the morning and a lot of stuff to throw out.....

    I hope I've made this crystal clear.

    Do not put hot items in a walk in fridge or freezer.  Doing so will earn you a kick in the pants from the Chef.
     
    jim berman likes this.
  9. lakeified

    lakeified

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    MaryB said it best, immersion chiller. I too, homebrew, and it's one of the things I've taken with me as a technique on stocks in the stockpot. Obviously, buy one that fits your stockpot and a connector for whatever water source you have nearby. They sell adapters to fit to kitchen faucets if you don't have something more standard.  

    And use a large sanitized spoon and stir like your life depended on it. Chillers cool around the flow of the coils. Stirring moves more liquid near the coils, and evens the temperature as it cools.
     
  10. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    4,983
    Likes Received:
    537
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    I dunno about that immersion thingee...it's a lot of untreated copper surface area.  Heckuva lot of copper to keep clean and shiny, as oxidized copper tends to leave a coppery/metallic taste in your mouth.

    As someone who's spent almost 35 years in commercial kitchens, I can tell you that health inspectors prefer the icewand and water bath technique, it works very fast.
     
  11. dogpokerpaintin

    dogpokerpaintin

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    When using ice baths, use the shallowest hotel pan you have and stirring every few minutes. You can chill a 2 inch hotel pan fast with this method.
     
  12. maryb

    maryb

    Messages:
    2,501
    Likes Received:
    181
    Exp:
    Semi pro/retired now
    They make stainless coils... either can go in the dishwasher for cleaning but a simple soapy scrub pad wiped around the coil will clean it. we used to soap it up good, scrub then rinse in the shower when I home brewed with a friend.
     
  13. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Well, that's never happened, and he's the guy who thought of it.  Lol.  I'll pass the message though.  It's a big freezer, and its door is in the cooler, both which were built off the building.  I don't know if that helps or not.  Probably not.  But he's been doing it for years.  We leave the freezer door open into the cooler when we do it.  Honestly, I think it is stupid, and hate doing it but I get paid to bleed, not lead. 

    But thank you for stopping someone else from using my bad second hand advice.

    I love those ice wands though.  So do health inspectors.  Around here they practically insist you use them if you aren't heating something.  He's too cheap to buy the good ones, and some cheap ones he got online cracked.  I don't know about those metal coils, especially copper.  Most shelved foods have chemicals added to them to remove most of the metallic taste that cans impart onto the product.  Wonders such as EDTA are also used for chelation therapy, which is a mega dose of that stuff in the body to bind heavy metals into a non-reactive molecule and to pass them from the body.  I imagine that could be an issue with using those.  Plus, I would never trust any dishwasher I've worked with to clean those things properly. 
     
  14. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    New possibly horrible idea.  Sheet tray rack(s).  Put a hotel pan ice bath system onto the sheet pans.  Put this contraption of contraptions and huge waste of effort into a large walk-in cooler.  Using a tailpot ladle the broth into the layers of chilling hotel pans from the big pot. Stir and stir some more.  Now, figure out how to carefully put this cooled broth back into a big pot without waste or injury.  Actually, don't do this.  Every step has a seemingly fatal flaw.
     
  15. foodpump

    foodpump

    Messages:
    4,983
    Likes Received:
    537
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    Yup.  Every step IS a fatal flaw. 

    Ladling hot stock into a 3/4" deep sheet pan? Better hope the floor in the freezer is level. 

    Speaking of floors, what happens if you drip a little?  By the time you get the mop the liquid has already frozen, making it a very slippery hazard. 

    And how do you get the stock out of the sheet pans? They don't come with a spout 

    All this, regardless of what I just explained what happens when you put piping hot items in a walk-in cooler or freezer...... 

    I know I sound like a (deleted), but we're supposed to be offering good advice here.
     
  16. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,161
    Likes Received:
    530
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Absolutely and emphatically agree. Also the steam that turns into water before it becomes ice also spends time in the temperature zone that is the perfect temperature for bacterial growth, not to mention the convection currents created by the steam that contribute to cross contamination of other products.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2015
  17. chefboyog

    chefboyog

    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    21
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Cooling two 7.5 gal pots is faster. Keep them off the floor. I put them in the walkin cooler, dont have problems with the condensers ( not many anyway).

    Cooling wands are good although I heard mention some of the older ones use cheap plastic which may leech chemicals. Other problem with cooling wands is if they are in The way in the freezer people tend to put them where they shoukdnt be, ie on the floor; cross contaminations.

    A sink full of ice with an overflow is the best option for large batches 15 gal is a big bucket. Keep the water running regardless if what the GM thinks. Mgt fears running water lol.
    Two sinks with 7.5 gal and two overflows and ice and eand and stirring is ideal. Time the cookdown as well have a cool down tracking sheet. Health inspectors will require this eventually.
     
    mckallidon likes this.
  18. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,161
    Likes Received:
    530
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    The steam that turns into water droplets, along with the resultant convection currents that carries the water droplets around, spends even more time in the danger zone than it does in the freezer.
     
  19. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    No worries.  Sorry, I was just having fun with that one.
     
  20. mckallidon

    mckallidon Banned

    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    You beat me to that good idea.  I was just thinking of that today at work when I saw a big pot soaking in the 3-basin and a server dumped ice left over from filling the bar in there.

    Don't go cheap on those cooling wands.  The cheap ones DO leech chemicals, and if they crack (they will), you just lost money on that and whatever was in that pot.  We lost 20 gallons of chili to learn that lesson.  Don't buy them off amazon.  Get legit ones from a brick-and-mortar supply place.  Maybe webstaurant has good ones, but Idk.