Is There A Dish That You’ve Just Mastered?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kaneohegirlinaz, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    In Hawaii, there are many, many dishes that I never really needed to learn to make, they were just always available, anywhere, everywhere!

    One dish that I cannot find here in the middle of the Southwest desert is

    Kalua (ka-loo-ah) Pig or Pork

    ONO (YUMMY) ! 

    This is the omnipresent main dish at any and all Luaus or feasts. 

    You’ll find this prepared many different ways at lunch trucks as well as in restaurants, in the State Of Hawaii that is, NOT Arizona.

    So I mashed together some recipes that I found and made my own

    Oven-Kalua-Style-Pork.

     
  2. butzy

    butzy

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    I learned (taught myself) a lot of dishes when I moved out of Europe as I couldn't get them in the different African countries were I have lived.
    Nice crispy chips was one of them!
    So were bitterballen (small meat croquettes), freshly oasted peanuts, satay sauce, pea soup and a variety of others.
    Sauerkraut is still on my list. Tried it once, but failed.
    I basically learned a lot about substituting one ingredient for another.
     
  3. 23years

    23years

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    My Sous chef and I just made a brussel sprout kim-chee! Yum!
     
  4. helloitslucas

    helloitslucas

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    I wouldn't say that I've "mastered" it, but I am fully obsessed with trying to learn the authentic mexican cuisine I got used to living in the United States. After moving to Switzerland early this year, I am truly missing Mexican food and spend as much time as possible trying to replicate/learn how to cook it. So far my favourite that I have been able to make "authentically" is chilorio. MMMM.
     
  5. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    It took me many try-outs to make an excellent chilli con carne. As an European, it's not so evident, I have nothing authentic to compare my concoction with. One major obstacle was finding the right chillies. I gave up on that and now use powdered chilli combined with spanish pimenton (smoked paprika powder). It works fa-bu-lous-ly!

    And yes, I do add beans, I love beans in this dish even when they are not supposed to be there as I read here and there. So here's my last "eurochilli".

     
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2013
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    No, I'm too self critical to consider myself a master at any dish.  There's always a process and a result and sometimes it's excellent and sometimes it's only good.  
     
  7. helloitslucas

    helloitslucas

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    Absolutely lovely! You are right about the chilies here in Europe. I was so surprised that only basic bells or sweet anaheim-like were available. Even in the farmer markets! I'm a bit too late to plant peppers, but I will for sure be doing that next year.
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @ chris & lucas, couldn’t you guys GROW your own hot peppers from seed in Europe?  That could really take off in the farmers markets in your area, or maybe just offering them to the local chefs?
     
  9. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I'm really just learning to cook meat in the last year or so. Just got around to making a pork tenderloin I'm happy with. Marinated in orange/lime juice with garlic, shallots, cilantro and chipotles. Brown well on the stove top then into the oven to finish. Make a pan sauce with the leftover marinade and the fond left in the skillet, then strain it before lapping it over the sliced tenderloin.
     
  10. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    K-girl, I am growing two plants from seeds I collected, it's an experiment. A good month after the plants popped out of the seeds, they are now less than 1 inch high (sigh).

    I guess our cold climate is not fit for growing peppers outdoors and also, we had the worst spring temperatures ever. I know a few people though who grow them in a greenhouse with more success.

    When I visit local "etnic" stores, I often find spanish padrones (1 out of 10 is hot) and some other varieties. Their offer changes all the time. In fact, when making chilli, my result is always consistent when using powdered chilli.
     
  11. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Right on Terry!

    You know, proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and turkey have given me troubles.  We’ve lived in this house now for going on 6 years of cooking on the same ‘devices’ : gas grill, electric glass top stove, electric oven etc.  And I still get it either, over done for my liking or too rare for DH.  I’ve resorted to counting in my head as I grill and knowing that so many seconds with each turn for each different cut of meat will come out pretty close to our taste.
     
  12. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Chris, what kinds/types/brands of dry chiles can you find there in Belgium? 

    When I make my ‘Cowboy chili’ I just love to use ground chipotle and pasilla. 

    I don’t always use fresh peppers, surprisingly enough living in the southwest,

    as you say, they are not necessarily consistent.

    And good on you for making that effort to grow your own peppers!
     
  13. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Chris : There are numerous spice stores in the U.S. that ship. Dried chili's don't weigh much so you could have a large amount shipped. It'll do wonders for Mexican tasting meat chili.

    Also, here in NYC (in Chinatown and out in Flushing, Queens) they sell potted chili plants in all the Asian markets that do well indoors.  Also, you can freeze chilies. If you keep the condensation from forming into ice they are adequate. They're just squishy and not firm but they still have the fresh flavor. Also, you can reconstitute dried chili's like chipotle, guajillo, etc. to make into sauces. But I'm sure you knew this already. 
     
  14. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    K-girl

    I'd be lost, LOST without an instant read thermometer!
     
  15. helloitslucas

    helloitslucas

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    I retract my previous comment about not getting chilies with actual heat here or normal Southern US/Mexican chilies here in Europe. I walked down to the big pepper grower here in Lucerne, Switzerland, and he told me nearly exactly what Chris did. We have had a wet, low temperature season here. Even in the greenhouses they couldn't grow spicy peppers such as habanero, etc. because there hasn't been much of a sunlight here.

    So, yes! We can get them here, I just moved here on the wrong year!
     
  16. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    K-Girl, chipotle and pasilla as you mentioned are not available here. Most supermarkets offer those long thin pointy moderately hot red peppers that don't even have a specific name other than "hot red peppers", a pedestrian chilli pepper so to speak. Every now and then they have the same looking mini variant (Thai??) in bright red and green mixture which are very hot. And in etnic shops I often find green spanish padrones that aren't even hot (except 1 out of ten). And finally these etnic shops may offer temporarely odd shaped peppers but there's never any name on them. They are offered in bulk, so you need to help yourself, you know, it's kind of a Maroccan souk style of shop.

    Jake, I have been looking around on the internet and found a number of sites which list all kinds of peppers I never even heard of. I'm quite sure importing food is very tricky, so I stick to my dried powdered stuff. I do frequently use spanish pimenton in very small quantities in many other dishes; I  love that smokey taste.

    Lucas, I would never have guessed Switzerland produces chillies! Let's maybe agree that the average Swiss doesn't really have that hot spicy southern character, hahaha.
     
  17. thompson

    thompson

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    Wouldn't say I've mastered it, but my 'best dish' is a bolognese sauce made with roasted onions and tomatoes, cooked gently for about three hours. The long cooking time brings a gorgeous, close texture that coats pasta really well. Next time I make it I'll post a few pics here.

    ChrisBelgium: that chilli looks incredible and totally unlike any i've ever made. could you give a rough overview of how you do it?
     
  18. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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  19. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Who was it here at CT last year made their own Sauerkraut in hug jugs?  Oh now that's going to bother me, I'll hunt that down! 
     
  20. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @ butzy, I FOUND IT!!! 

    I am a stubborn little bulldog!

    Gene(machine) from Bavaria posted this

    http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69652/what-did-you-have-for-dinner/900

    post # 914

    Quote:

    Nothing complicated. You take a clay pot like this:


    (which is actually not my sauerkraut pot, but the smaller one holding the kim chi - was too lazy to walk into the cellar for a pic, so I just photographed the one in the pantry)

    Take some cabbage, slice it finely, mix with 3 teaspoons salt, 1.5 tablespoon juniper berries, 1.5 tablespoon caraway, 3 tablespoons sugar per kilogram of cabbage, put it into the pot and pound it until the juice comes out. If the juice does not cover the cabbage, add some boiled and cooled water until the cabbage is covered. Put some whole cabbage leaves on top and weigh it down with a heavy stone. Cover the pot with a lid and let it ferment for at least 4 weeks. You can add some whey (unpasteurized) to start the lactic acid fermentation, but it's not strictly necessary.