Is Osso Bucco shin or femur?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know.  Where is it from?

    Yes, google it for me, I could google it too but I just want to chat and see what people have to say about it.  I love the dish.  My wife is making it tonight (yes I give her a chance to use the kitchen too)
     
  2. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Shin... but i suppose one could use femur but it'd be roughly pie plate or larger in size!

    .... hmm got me thinking now...
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Femur is upper leg from hip to knee. Tibia and the fibula is lower leg from knee to ankle including the shin. The tibia is the larger of these bones and more in the "meat" of the leg.

    Interestingly, pork has the fibula, beef and sheep do not. 

    This is a handy guide.

    http://www.aps.uoguelph.ca/~swatland/ch2_1.htm

    If your ossobucco was cut from the front legs, you could still have two bones, depending where in the foreleg it was cut. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2014
  4. michaelga

    michaelga

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     Same with people, 2 bones in both lower legs and lower arms, wonder if it's the reason certain tribes use the term "long-pig"...
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, I was just assuming hind legs, but I suppose it could be cut from the front too I guess.
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    It's generally front shin.  Beef shin is big, but lots of collagen, veal is smaller about the same size as pork which think comes from higher up.  I'm thinking this because of the hock. 

    I snap veal up when it's a "manager's special" (used meat).  We are experiencing some excellent Osso Bucco weather.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  7. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    If I remember this correctly, I would have believed this to be from fore or hind leg femur just above the knee joint to about 5-6 inches up. This would give two cuts before getting into the shoulder or rump. I say this because, the cuts I am most familiar with are typically 3 to 4 inches in diameter and have four distinct muscles surrounding the bone.

    Now, at the grocery store I have seen smaller in recent years but thought that to be more maximizing the profit by using the lesser shank. That I was taught was anything below the knee in the shin and would have only two distinct muscles surrounding bone. Then again, bucco, buca or any variation of Italian dialect can mean below or under and that would be the shank. Or.....maybe I'm confusing this with lamb? Actually, it's been too long since I've made either to say with 100% certainty. The DD loves veal....maybe I can find some and make this for her.

    Not to vary from the discussion but as a couple variations for the service, try the osso bucco done in the style of Veal Marengo or even with a Marsala wine reduction. I've served it both ways with great success.

    Edit; I just saw Michael's post mentioning the two bones in the lower. That makes sense and I would have to stick with my original stab at remembering. I'm gonna google it now to see what exactly I might have forgotten. This could be depressing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    It's one of these things I take for granted but never really taken the time to investigate.  I searched for "veal cuts" and all the pictures seem to show it's the upper part of the leg.