Is it possible to make an extract from beer.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by salmon698847, Nov 26, 2016.

  1. salmon698847

    salmon698847

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    I would like to make an extract of Guiness stout, but I'm at a loss as where to even begin the process, I know the normal route is to take the draped flavor ingredient and soak it in alcohol in a sealed container...but it's a liquid...and already contains alcohol. Would a reduction be more along the lines of what I'm looking for? Or would i need to do an extract of the malted hops and barley used in the beer to attain the desired flavor?
     
  2. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I would think a reduction is exactly what you want. What is the purpose of this?
     
  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    The problem with reducing most beers is that it tends to drive off many of the nuanced flavors and you are left with a lot of bitterness.  I have tried this exact thing with Guinness and didn't have much success without having to add a lot of other things to bolster the flavors and mask the bitterness.
     
  4. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    You can buy that. Its used by home brewers to make beer at home. Do a search and you'll find it.

    Good Luck!

    Peachcreek
     
  5. maryb

    maryb

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    No you can't buy a Guinness flavored malt. You can buy the base malt but it won't have the hops and other added malts that give the real flavor of the beer. I am a home brewer and know how beer is made.

    I would think a low temp vacuum boil would preserve the flavor and I have done it using my food saver and the liquid inside a canning jar in a water bath. I have the canning jar lid sealer. It was a lot of trial and error to find a temp to drive off liquid but not have it foam up and clog my foodsaver vacuum pump...
     
  6. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I spent 20+ years making beer from extracts. Well, we did do a few all grain batches, it wasn't all extracts.  What exactly are you trying to accomplish here?

    mjb.
     
  7. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    What do you want to do with this extract? That affects what methods will be most suitable.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  8. maryb

    maryb

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    This is one of many Guinness clone recipes out on the internet, how to convert this to a syrup?

    Guinness Draught clone


    (5 gallons/19 L, extract with grains)
    OG = 1.038 FG = 1.006
    IBU = 45 SRM = 40 ABV = 4.2%
    Ingredients

    14.5 oz. (411 g) Muntons Light dried malt extract
    2.66 lbs. (1.21 kg) Muntons Light liquid malt extract (late addition)
    1 lbs. 6 oz. (0.62 kg) English pale ale malt (3 °L)
    10 oz. (0.28 kg) flaked barley
    1.0 lb. (0.45 kg) roasted barley (500 °L)
    12 AAU East Kent Goldings hops (60 min) (2.4 oz./68 g of 5% alpha acids)
    Wyeast 1084 (Irish Ale) or White Labs WLP004 (Irish Ale) yeast (2 qt./2 L yeast starter)
    0.75 cups corn sugar (for priming)
    Step by Step

    Place crushed grains and flaked barley in a steeping bag. In a large kitchen pot, heat 4.5 qts. (4.3 L) to 161 °F (72 °C) and submerge grain bag. Let grains steep for 45 minutes at around 150 °F (66 °C). While grains are steeping, begin heating 2.1 gallons (7.9 L) of water in your brewpot. When steep is over, remove 1.25 qts. (1.2 L) of water from brewpot and add to the "grain tea" in steeping pot. Place colander over brewpot and place steeping bag in it. Pour diluted grain tea through grain bag. Heat liquid in brewpot to a boil, then stir in dried malt extract and hops and begin the 60 minute boil. With 15 minutes left in boil, turn off heat and stir in liquid malt extract. Stir well to dissolve extract, then resume heating. (Keep the boil clock running while you stir.) At the end of the boil, cool wort and transfer to fermenter. Add water to make 5 gallons (19 L), aerate wort and pitch yeast. Ferment at 72 °F (22 °C). Rack to secondary when fermentation is complete. Bottle when beer falls clear.

    Wang, Dang, Sweet Guinness Tang

    To get that "Guinness tang," try this. After pitching the yeast to your stout, siphon 19 oz. of pitched wort to a sanitized 22 oz. bottle. Pitch bottle with a small amount of Brettanomyces and Lactobacillus. Cover bottle with aluminum foil and let ferment. When beer in bottle is done fermenting, pour it in a saucepan and heat to 160 °F (71 °C) for 15 minutes. Cool the beer and pour and pour it back in the bottle. Cap bottle and refrigerate. Add to stout when bottling or kegging.
     
  9. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    It would really help if the OP let us know what they wanted to use this "extract" for.
     
  10. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    @Mary...
    A few things odd about that recipe.
    First, thats a rather low finished gravity for a
    stout. Ive brewed IPAs with higher FGs.
    15 minute boil for liquid extract, hour for D.E.?
    Sparging to fermenter then adding water to volume
    is never a good idea, in terms of sanitation. And if you have to,
    it needs to be freshly boiled, cooled while sealed then added.
    Also seems an 86% attenuation would yield more than 4.2%
    alcohol as well, but not sure about that.
    Just sayin....
     
  11. maryb

    maryb

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    It was the first clone recipe that popped up lol I am not a huge Guinness fan... and if I did clone it I would go all grain...
     
  12. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Ive done it all grain, and extracts with other grains.
    Both are good, extracts are less work.
     
  13. maryb

    maryb

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    Extract is more expensive... I just made a 11 gallon batch of strong bitter for $35 or so. So 4 cases of good ale for under $10 a case... The brew rig I built for $200

     
    pete likes this.
  14. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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       Hi Meez,

       4.1, 4.2 is right in line with where Guinness dry stout is.  Stouts don't fit the category because of any high amount of base malt, it's the specialty grains, and water profile.  You can certainly get a stout that has a higher ABV than a Guinness dry stout, Russian Imperial Stout's can get pretty high ABV.  Here's a link to Stout profiles and descriptions by sub-category.   But there are a few things odd in that recipe

       Mary, nice brew system!
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2016
  15. maryb

    maryb

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    Many top the fermenter off with bottled water which should be pretty sanitary. In brewing sterile conditions never exist, a single dust particle could hold a LOT of wild yeast spores for example.
     
  16. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Many may, but I don't. I boil. I rarely top off 5gal batches, but when I do I boil a small pot and sparge carefully.
    Proper sanitation is all about keeping those stray dust particles OUT of your wort. Once you have 5 gallons of beloved
    beer you spent $$ and slaved on for a week spoil, you find yourself redoubling your sanitation efforts. The weak spot in my
    experience is when sparging.
     
  17. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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        The recipe almost reads like a modified brew in a bag instruction.  When talking about adding additional brewing water to make volume, only way I would consider it, is dealing with a thin sparge.  If you drop below the 2.5 into 2.0P range (or below 1.010 - 1.008) range...you're better off stopping your sparge and filling the boil kettle to the desired volume with additional brewing water.  Pulling below these ranges, during sparge, risks pulling some bad tannins leading to off flavors.  Add the water...then continue with your boil (as you're saying too)

    cheers 
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
  18. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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       That really is a question that needs to be answered.  Wonder if the poster is still out there?

       Hey, original poster...come back
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
  19. maryb

    maryb

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    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  20. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Yeah it did have a brew bag or "kit" brew feel. At least it didnt call for 2 cups of table sugar, as a lot of em do. ! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif