Is it me or all Italian recipes ended up tasting the same?

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Joined Sep 5, 2008
First don't get me wrong since I make Italian dishes every week but I got the feeling somehow they all end up tasting the same. I mean almost every Italian recipe more or less goes something like this:
1. Wheat base (bread/pizza/pasta)
2. Tomato
3. Garlic
4. Cheese
5. Basil or parsley
6. then mixing with seafood or meat (since Italians don't like tofu).

Maybe my cooking skills are not good enough but anyway that's my opinion.
 
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Joined Sep 21, 2001
I have a problem with my Italian food. I keep putting the same things in in the same amount and cook it the same every time. But it ends up tasting the same. I think my food is defective! Can you help!
 
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The answer was in a previous thread......it goes something like this......drive a Ferrari around a track but you need to do it once a week and you need to drive the same Ferrari around the same track each week.....Italian food mastered.....that’s how Jamie Oliver did it......if you’re Italian just drive a Fiat.
 
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Italian food outside of Italy has sadly been reduced to the notion that a little garlic, a little basil, a little parsley or Oregano and a tomato or two is all that's needed for the dish to be "Italian." In reality, Italian cuisine is one of the most diverse categories of cuisine there is. A chef could spend an entire career studying Italian cuisine and never learn or experience all of the recipes and styles of Italian food that exist from Sicily to Milan.

There are many good resources you could use to expand your knowledge of Italian cuisine. I think you will find the effort very worth while and perhaps, quite fun.

Cheers!
 
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I guess you need to take a road trip and taste what is there. The food in Sicily was different from the food in Naples was different from the food in Livorno. try making pork cutlets with blood or sour orange sauce. green vegetable casserole with a green half way between spinach and collards. they do make starch dishes with rice or corn meal. they cook over open flame, vegetables as well as beef. of course the old favorite, Naples Red Lead; fresh tomatoes, browned pork neck bone, garlic and onion that have slow simmered for a day or two.
 
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Yup... and to think... pasta isn’t Italian after all but Chinese. Italian is truly fusion cuisine!
 
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and to think..... tomatoes aren't Italian after all but from New World. heck, most everyone in Europe thought they were poison until the 1800's.
 
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Spanish cuisine, especially in the North, is the closest to the original Roman diet of all modern cuisines. Despite introducing Europe to new world ingredients, Spanish cuisine adopted very few of them. Even tomatoes, which seem almost universal nowadays, are pretty rare outside of Catalonia.
 
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I love how people took this thread seriously, lol.

Is it me or all Russian recipes ended up tasting the same? Don't get me wrong, I watched a lot of James Bond as a kid and saw The Hunt for Red October a couple of times, but I get the feeling that all Russian recipes go something like this:

1. Potato
2. Cabbage
3. Beets
4. Potato
5. Vodka
6. Caviar
7. Beets
8. Potato

Maybe I just suck as a cook but whatever that's just what I think. Don't @ me.
 
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Joined Apr 24, 2011
I love how people took this thread seriously, lol.

Is it me or all Russian recipes ended up tasting the same? Don't get me wrong, I watched a lot of James Bond as a kid and saw The Hunt for Red October a couple of times, but I get the feeling that all Russian recipes go something like this:

1. Potato
2. Cabbage
3. Beets
4. Potato
5. Vodka
6. Caviar
7. Beets
8. Potato

Maybe I just suck as a cook but whatever that's just what I think. Don't @ me.

BAHAHA!!

Really, I suppose you could summarize all cuisines the same way, couldn't you?
Each one takes a few key ingredients and that's the focal point.
What ever is most available to that particular area.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Jun 11, 2001
Ahem... If you don't use the same recipe it won't always taste the same. ;)
 
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Joined May 2, 2018
First don't get me wrong since I make Italian dishes every week but I got the feeling somehow they all end up tasting the same. I mean almost every Italian recipe more or less goes something like this:
1. Wheat base (bread/pizza/pasta)
2. Tomato
3. Garlic
4. Cheese
5. Basil or parsley
6. then mixing with seafood or meat (since Italians don't like tofu).

Maybe my cooking skills are not good enough but anyway that's my opinion.
Granted, I would say yes to your list of ingredient's for Traditional Italian dishes in regard's to popular pasta dishes. There are however several Italian food's made outside of this basic realm beginning with Marsala's and various sauces that are not tomato based. I would do a little research in the various regions of Italy. You will find Italian food's that even fall on the lighter side such as Pesce (fish) dishes that are quite delishous! I am interested to see what you find out and like.
 
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0
Joined May 2, 2018
First don't get me wrong since I make Italian dishes every week but I got the feeling somehow they all end up tasting the same. I mean almost every Italian recipe more or less goes something like this:
1. Wheat base (bread/pizza/pasta)
2. Tomato
3. Garlic
4. Cheese
5. Basil or parsley
6. then mixing with seafood or meat (since Italians don't like tofu).

Maybe my cooking skills are not good enough but anyway that's my opinion.
Also, a good book is 'The Plantpower Way: Italia' by Julie Piatt and yes there are several Vegan Italian's who enjoy fabulous food. I hope this gives some inspiration!
 

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